Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: FL and GA on the coastal plain. Ranges throughout central Florida (Wunderlin 1982). In the Florida panhandle, P. integrifolia is reported from Liberty to Dixie County (Clewell 1985); in south central Georgia in Lowndes, Cook, Lanier and Atkinson Counties (Jones and Coile 1988).

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Subshrubs or shrubs, 30–150 cm. Stems strigillose to glabrate, not stipitate-glandular. Leaf blades lanceolate to linear, 25–90 × 2–13 mm. Involucres broadly turbinate. Phyllaries 8–11 × 1–3.5 mm, unequal, glabrous or glabrate. Ray florets 0. Disc florets 10–26; corollas ± actinomorphic, 7–13 mm, throats ± funnelform, shorter than lobes. Cypselae 5–6 mm; pappus scales of inner cypselae 4–7 mm. 2n = 24.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Polypteris integrifolia Nuttall, Gen. N. Amer. Pl. 2: 139. 1818
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Dry pinelands (Wnderlin 1982). Sandy pine and oak woods (Cronquist 1980). Sandhills and coastal hammocks (Clewell 1988).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Frequent in sandy woods and coastal hammocks throughout central Florida. Georgia range restricted to the Suwannoochee River watershed of south central Georgia.

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Wikipedia

Palafoxia integrifolia

Palafoxia integrifolia, commonly known as the coastalplain palafox and coastal plain palafox, is a species of palafox native to the southeastern United States.

Description[edit]

A flower is visited by a large, brown and black beetle
Palafoxia integrifolia is pollinated by insects such as the delta flower scarab.

Palafoxia integrifolia is a herbaceous annual plant with pinkish-white disc flowers arranged in inflorescences. It has glossy, alternating leaves which are elogate on the lower portion of the stems and more linear at the top.[2] The stems of P. integrifolia are less woody than other species of palafox, making it prone to drooping.[2]

Taxonomy and etymology[edit]

P. integrifolia was described in 1842 by Thomas Nuttall. The generic name refers to José de Palafox y Melci,[3] while the species name is derived from the Latin word integrifolius, meaning "having entire leaves". Polypteris integrifolia is a valid synonym.[3]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

P. integrifolia is found in the states of Georgia and Florida, where it grows in sandy uplands.[2]

Ecology[edit]

Like other Palafoxia species, P. integrifolia is attractive to birds and insects, which aid in pollination.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Plants Profile for Palafoxia integrifolia (Coastal plain palafox)". plants.usda.gov. Retrieved 2014-05-25. 
  2. ^ a b c "Native Florida Wildflowers: Coastalplain Palafox - Palafoxia integrifolia". hawthornhillwildflowers.blogspot.com. Retrieved 2014-05-25. 
  3. ^ a b "Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center - The University of Texas at Austin". wildflower.org. Retrieved 2014-05-25. 
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