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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Taxonomic History

1 subspecies

Formica vaga Scopoli, 1763: 312 (w.) AUSTRIA. AntCat AntWiki

Taxonomic history

Latreille, 1802a: 96 (w.q.m.).
[Misspelled as Camponotus vagans: Emery, 1891c: 20.].
Subspecies of Camponotus herculeanus: Polyrhachis e affini. Memorie della Reale Accademia delle Scienze dell'Istituto di Bologna (5)5:363-382 [pagination of separate: 761-780]. [1896]">Emery, 1896j: 372; Emery, 1908a PDF: 185; Bondroit, 1910 PDF: 488.
Revived status as species: Ruzsky, 1905b: 241; Forel, 1915d: 68; Emery, 1916a PDF: 225; Emery, 1920b PDF: 255; Finzi, 1924a PDF: 14; Karavaiev, 1927d: 275; Finzi, 1930d PDF: 317; Santschi, 1931a: 11; Stitz, 1939: 246.
See also: Yasumatsu & Brown, 1951: 31; Arnol'di & Dlussky, 1978: 551; Atanassov & Dlussky, 1992: 214.
Senior synonym of Camponotus pubescens: Olivier, 1792: 492; Emery, 1891c: 20; Forel, 1892j PDF: 306; of Camponotus fuscoptera: Latreille, 1802a: 96; of Camponotus kodorica: Camponotus s. str. [In Russian.]. Zoologicheskii Zhurnal 76:554-564. [1997-05]">Radchenko, 1997B PDF: 558.
Current subspecies: nominal plus Camponotus vagus ifranensis.
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Biology

Mostly open forests and forest edges, nests in dead wood
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30 . Camponotus vagus HNS (Scopoli, 1763)

Figs. 116-120.

Formica vaga Scopoli HNS , 1763:312.

In this group of species the anterior border of the clypeus is entire, straight or feebly convex and does not extend beyond the mandibular insertions. The alitrunk in the worker caste is high and steep sided; in profile the dorsum is convex without a break, the dorsal face of the propodeum abruptly curving into the long almost vertical basal face. From above the pronotum is much wider than the rest of the alitrunk which narrows to half its width posteriorly. Mandibles are large with five strong teeth which are often blunted and worn in the larger workers. The male has the mandibles slender with an apical tooth only.

Worker. Uniformly black with profuse body hairs. The sculpture is finely transverse and closely punctured, obscured by long thick pubescence. Length: 6-12 mm. Queen. As worker. Length: 14-16 mm.

Male. Pubescence dilute; petiole deeply emarginate rising to a sharp acute angle at each side of the dorsal crest. Length: 9-10 mm.

Distribution. Sweden: Öl . and Gtl. - Finland: Ab and Ka. Rare. - Range: a South European species abundant in the Mediterranean area, but recorded from Portugal to South Russia and the mountains of North Africa to Poland.

Biology. C. vagus HNS nests in dry rotten wood among roots under stones in dry sun exposed banks. It is an active aggressive species biting freely on disturbance. As with other species of this group it is both carnivorous and aphidicolous. According to Pisarski (1961) alatae have been recorded in July in Poland where it occurs very locally in the Centre and South.

Note. Forsslund (1957a) doubted its existence in Fennoscandia as the only verifiable specimen was an alate queen taken in Öland . However, there is a good series of workers from Gotland in the University of Lund collection, an old specimen from Karelia australis in the Helsinki Museum and a live colony has been kept under observation by A. K. Merisuo at Rymattylla in southwest Finland (Merisuo and Kapyla, 1975).

  • Collingwood, C. A. (1979): The Formicidae (Hymenoptera) of Fennoscandia and Denmark. Fauna Entomologica Scandinavica 8, 1-174: 90-90, URL:http://antbase.org/ants/publications/6175/6175.pdf
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Plazi

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Distribution

Throughout SLO
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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Taxonomic Treatment

Forel, A., 1904:
 Caucase septentrional, Region de Kuban, Stat. Armavir, 1 [[ queen ]], VII. 1894 (Grum-Grzimajlo!).
 
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Records

 

(Map 62): Bulgaria ( Agosti and Collingwood 1987a , Atanassov and Dlusskij 1992 ); Central Predbalkan: Dermantsi vill. (Lukovit) ( Atanassov 1934 ); Western Stara Planina Mts: Ogoya vill. ( Atanassov 1934 ), Ledenika cave (Vratsa Balkan) ( Atanassov 1936 ); Central Stara Planina Mts: Kostinya river valley (Teteven) ( Atanassov 1936 ); Zemen Gorge: Zemen ( Atanassov 1934 ); Sofia Basin: Sofia ( Atanassov 1936 , Lapeva-Gjonova and Atanasova 2004 , Antonova 2005 , Antonova and Penev 2006 , 2008 ), the surroundings of Sofia ( Antonova and Penev 2006 ); Lyulin Mt. ( Atanassov 1934 ); Vitosha Mt. ( Atanassov 1936 , 1952 ); Plana Mt.: Bukov dol loc. (Pasarel vill.), Pasarel vill. (Vagalinski and Lapeva-Gjonova in press ); Podbalkan Basins: Rose valley ( Atanassov et al. 1955 ); Ihtimanska Sredna Gora Mts: Benkovski peak ( Atanassov 1934 ); Lozenska Planina Mt. ( Vassilev and Evtimov 1973 ); Thracian Lowland: Krichim ( Atanassov 1936 ); Strandzha Mt.: Papia peak ( Atanassov 1934 ), Malko Tarnovo ( Atanassov 1936 ); Osogovska Planina Mt.: Hisarlaka (Kyustendil) ( Atanassov 1936 ); Belasitsa Mt. ( Atanassov 1964 ); Krupnik-Sandanski-Petrich Valley: along Strumeshnitsa river, around Parvomay vill. ( Atanassov 1964 ); Slavianka Mt. ( Atanassov 1936 ); Western Rhodopi Mts: Dospat, Batak ( Lapeva-Gjonova in press (a) ); Eastern Rhodopi Mts: Madzharovo ( Lapeva-Gjonova 2004a ); Northern Black Sea coast: Evksinograd palace ( Atanassov 1936 ); Southern Black Sea coast: Veselie vill. ( Forel 1892 ).

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Caucase septentrional, Region de Kuban, Stat. Armavir, 1 [[ queen ]], VII. 1894 (Grum-Grzimajlo!).

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Forel, A.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Camponotus vagus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Camponotus vagus

Camponotus vagus is a species of large, black, West Palaearctic carpenter ant with a wide range that includes much of Europe, a large area of Asia, and part of Africa.[1][2]

Contents

Description

Camponotus vagus – Lateral view

Camponotus vagus is a relatively distinctive species that is easily identified by its large size, uniform black colour, and the long and dense body "hairs" on its exoskeleton. A eusocial insect, individuals have continuous allometric variation in size and morphology to facilitate task allocation and partitioning of work. Workers are 6–12 mm in length.[1] The larger "major workers" act as guards for in defence of the colony and protect the smaller "minor workers" when the latter go foraging outside the nests. The powerful mandibles of the major workers are capable of decapitating smaller arthropods captured as food and dismembering smaller ants of other species.[3]

Diet

C. vagus is known to be both carnivorous and aphidicolous (living in a mutualistic relationship with aphids and feeding upon the honeydew these smaller insects release from the terminations of their alimentary canals).[1][4]

Range

This species is especially prevalent in Central Europe but has an overall range from southern Scandinavia to north-western Africa and from Portugal to Altai, Mongolia.[1][5] Evidence of this species in Northern Europe is scattered and isolated; Southwards it is more common. In Norway, an extreme area of its range, is a rare and often overlooked species. There are few records of C. vagus in Sweden and Finland, and many of these are outdated.[1]

Habitat

The colonies are commonly found in dry habitats, especially open forests and forest edges.[1] C. vagus most typically builds its nests in dead wood, but colonies can also be founder under stones.[1][2] An average colony has 1,000 to 4,000 workers, but larger colonies contain up to 10,000 individuals.[1]

Common names

C. vagus, like all ants in genus Camponotus, may be referred to by the English language common name "carpenter ant" but it is known by other names across its range.[1] In the Netherlands, for example, this species is known in Dutch as zwarte reuzenmier, i.e. "black giant ant."[5]

Bee paralysis virus

In 2008, the Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) was reported for the first time in this species and another species of ant, Formica rufa. CPPV affects bees, ants, and mites.[6]

Taxonomic History

vagus. Formica vaga Scopoli, 1763: 312 (w.) AUSTRIA. Latreille, 1802c: 96 (w.q.m.). Hauschteck, 1961: 221 (k.). Combination in Camponotus: Roger, 1863b: 1; in C. (Camponotus): Forel, 1914a: 266. [Misspelled as vagans: Emery, 1891b: 20.] Subspecies of herculeanus: Emery, 1896d: 372; Emery, 1908a: 185; Bondroit, 1910: 488. Revived status as species: Ruzsky, 1905b: 241; Forel, 1915d: 68; Emery, 1916b: 225; Emery, 1920b: 255; Finzi, 1924a: 14; Karavaiev, 1927c: 275; Finzi, 1930d: 317; Santschi, 1931a: 11; Stitz, 1939: 246. See also: Yasumatsu & Brown, 1951: 31; Arnol'di & Dlussky, 1978: 551; Atanassov & Dlussky, 1992: 214. Senior synonym of pubescens: Olivier, 1792: 492; Emery, 1891b: 20; Forel, 1892i: 306; of fuscoptera: Latreille, 1802c: 96; of kodorica: Radchenko, 1997a: 558. Current subspecies: nominal plus ifranensis.[5]

As just noted, Camponotus vagus ifranensis (Cagniant, 1987) is recognized as a subspecies. Previously identified subspecies Camponotus vagus kodoricus (Forel, 1913) and Camponotus vagus vagus (Scopoli, 1763) are no longer recognized.[5][7]

References

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