Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 10–40 cm, colonial or cespitose; long-rhizomatous. Stems 1–5+, ascending to erect (light to dark brown), proximally glabrous, distally strigose, stipitate-glandular. Leaves (light green) firm, margins entire, scabrous; basal sometimes persistent, sessile, blades (1–3-nerved) linear-oblanceolate, 10–30 × 4–10 mm, bases attenuate, apices obtuse, mucronate, faces glabrate to sparsely scabrous; proximal cauline withering by flowering, sessile, blades (3-nerved) narrowly oblanceolate, 20–80 × 2–8 mm, bases cuneate, apices obtuse to acute, mucronulate or white-spinulose, faces glabrous or moderately short-strigose, stipitate-glandular; distal sessile, blades linear-oblanceolate to -lanceolate or oblong (distally), 20–50 × 2–5 mm, ± reduced distally, bases ± clasping to cuneate, apices acute, mucronulate, faces glabrous or moderately short-strigose, stipitate-glandular. Heads 1–10(–30), borne singly or in paniculiform arrays, branches ascending. Peduncles sparsely to moderately short-strigose, moderately stipitate-glandular, bracts ± ascending, linear to narrowly-lanceolate. Involucres campanulate to cylindro-campanulate, 5.5–8 mm. Phyllaries in 3–4 series, linear to lanceolate, subequal to unequal, bases ± indurate, margins scarious, green zones covering distal portion, apices acute to acuminate, outer ± foliaceous, spreading to reflexed, faces glabrate, sparsely to densely stipitate-glandular. Ray florets 15–31; corollas violet, laminae (5–)6–15 × 1–2 mm. Disc florets 25–40; corollas yellow, 4.5–6 mm, lobes triangular, 0.4–0.8 mm. Cypselae light brown, sometimes translucent reddish brown between ribs, narrowly obovoid, ± compressed, 2–2.5 mm, 3–4-nerved (faint), moderately strigose on ribs; pappi tawny, 3.8–6 mm. 2n = 10.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Aster campestris Nuttall, Trans. Amer. Philos. Soc., n. s. 7: 293. 1840; A. bloomeri A. Gray; A. campestris var. bloomeri (A. Gray) A. Gray; Symphyotrichum campestre var. bloomeri (A. Gray) G. L. Nesom; Virgulus campestris (Nuttall) Reveal & Keener
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Type Information

Isotype for Aster bloomeri A. Gray
Catalog Number: US 323085
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): H. Bloomer
Locality: Near Virginia City., Nevada, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Gray, A. 1865. Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 6: 539.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Found in dry meadows, diverse areas in otherwise conifer dominated regions, from 1500-2200 m. Dry meadow habitat may be threatened by succession in the absence of a regular fire return interval.

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: TNR - Not Yet Ranked

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Threats

Comments: Dry meadow habitat degradation as the result of fire suppression may threaten this taxon.

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Wikipedia

Symphyotrichum campestre

Symphyotrichum campestre (formerly Aster campestris) is a species of aster known by the common name western meadow aster. It is native to much of western North America from British Columbia, California, and the Rocky Mountains region, to Arizona and New Mexico., where it grows in many habitat types, generally at some elevation.

Description[edit]

It is a perennial herb growing to a maximum height near half a meter from a long rhizome. The thin brown stems are covered in rough hairs and resin glands. The leaves are a few centimeters long, linear to oval in shape, and often hairy. The glandular inflorescence holds several flower heads containing many violet ray florets around a center of long yellow disc florets. The fruit is a hairy achene.

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Notes

Comments

Two poorly defined varieties of Symphyotrichum campestre have been described. Variety campestre has glabrous or sparsely strigose leaves and occurs in southern British Columbia, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming. Bloomer’s Aster, var. bloomeri, has moderately strigose leaves and occurs in California, Nevada, and Oregon. The varieties are not sufficiently distinct to warrant recognition. Symphyotrichum ×columbianum (Piper) G. L. Nesom (syn. Aster columbianus Piper, A. multiflorus Aiton var. columbianus (Piper) S. F. Blake, Virgulus ×columbianus (Piper) Reveal & Keener) is the hybrid between S. campestre and S. ericoides subsp. pansum.
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