Overview

Distribution

circum-(sub)tropical
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Mesopelagic
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Epipelagic
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Depth range based on 3 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 2 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 138.58
  Temperature range (°C): 8.622 - 10.897
  Nitrate (umol/L): 11.592 - 26.169
  Salinity (PPS): 33.440 - 33.975
  Oxygen (ml/l): 2.414 - 4.916
  Phosphate (umol/l): 1.288 - 2.161
  Silicate (umol/l): 14.084 - 34.422

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 138.58

Temperature range (°C): 8.622 - 10.897

Nitrate (umol/L): 11.592 - 26.169

Salinity (PPS): 33.440 - 33.975

Oxygen (ml/l): 2.414 - 4.916

Phosphate (umol/l): 1.288 - 2.161

Silicate (umol/l): 14.084 - 34.422
 
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Wikipedia

Venus girdle

The Venus girdle, Cestum veneris, is a comb jelly in the family Cestidae. It is the only member of its genus, Cestum.[1]

Description[edit]

Venus girdles resemble transparent ribbons with iridescent edges. They may grow up to a metre in total length. Canals run the length of the ribbon which bioluminesce when disturbed. [2]

Distribution[edit]

This colonial animal is pelagic and is found in tropical and subtropical oceans worldwide in midwater.[2]

Ecology[edit]

These animals swim horizontally using muscular contractions as well as the beating of the comb rows. The oral edge leads. They eat small crustaceans.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=106363 accessed 10 September 2013
  2. ^ a b c Wrobel D. & Mills C. 2003. Pacific Coast Pelagic Invertebrates: a guide to the common gelatinous animals. Sea Challengers. ISBN 0-930118-23-5
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