Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

M 31-33 mm. F 45-51 mm. A small frog with a broad head and a short pointed snout with sharp edges. All toes are webbed to the base of the discs (except for the fourth toe). The two outer fingers are fully webbed to the discs. Smooth skin on head and back; granular skin on chest and stomach. Colour varies from light grey-green to sandy brown. Some species have dark crossbars on the back and white spots on the side of the head or body. Sides of the body and inner surfaces of the legs are typically bright yellow with several big black spots. Chest and stomach are pearly white (Inger and Stuebing 2005).

Tadpoles: Body is oval and slightly flattened above. Slender tail is twice the size of the body. Wide lips form a cup-like structure. Body is dark and almost black on top and sides. Tail muscle mottled with dark spots; upper fin with smaller dark spots. Total length reaches 36 mm (Inger and Stuebing 2005).

  • Inger, R. F. and Stuebing, R. B. (2005). A Field Guide to the Frogs of Borneo, 2nd edition. Natural History Publications (Borneo), Kota Kinabalu.
  • Inger, R., Stuebing, R., Iskandar, D., and Mumpuni (2004). Rhacophorus angulirostris. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 06 May 2009.
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Distribution

Distribution and Habitat

This species is known from northern Borneo (Malaysia) and from one locality in Sumatra, Indonesia. It has been observed at an altitudinal range of 700-1800 m asl (Inger et al. 2004). It occurs in primary forest and can be found along clear, rocky streams. Tadpoles live in gravel riffles (Inger and Stuebing 2005).

  • Inger, R. F. and Stuebing, R. B. (2005). A Field Guide to the Frogs of Borneo, 2nd edition. Natural History Publications (Borneo), Kota Kinabalu.
  • Inger, R., Stuebing, R., Iskandar, D., and Mumpuni (2004). Rhacophorus angulirostris. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 06 May 2009.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:57
Specimens with Sequences:31
Specimens with Barcodes:29
Species:16
Species With Barcodes:12
Public Records:9
Public Species:6
Public BINs:7
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Barcode data

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Conservation

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

The call sounds like a sharp chirp (Inger and Stuebing 2005).

  • Inger, R. F. and Stuebing, R. B. (2005). A Field Guide to the Frogs of Borneo, 2nd edition. Natural History Publications (Borneo), Kota Kinabalu.
  • Inger, R., Stuebing, R., Iskandar, D., and Mumpuni (2004). Rhacophorus angulirostris. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 06 May 2009.
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Threats

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Habitat loss as a result of clear-cutting is the major threat to this species, and logging has already severely damaged the habitat at one known locality, Mount Trus Madi, in Borneo. Besides Gunung Kinabalu National Park, it is also present in the Crocker Range, in Malaysian Borneo; however, the Sumatran locality lies outside any protected areas (Inger et al. 2004).

  • Inger, R. F. and Stuebing, R. B. (2005). A Field Guide to the Frogs of Borneo, 2nd edition. Natural History Publications (Borneo), Kota Kinabalu.
  • Inger, R., Stuebing, R., Iskandar, D., and Mumpuni (2004). Rhacophorus angulirostris. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 06 May 2009.
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Wikipedia

Rhacophorus

Rhacophorus is a genus of frogs in the shrub frog family (Rhacophoridae) which together with the related Hylidae makes up the true tree frogs. They live in India, Japan, Madagascar, Africa, and Southeast Asia. "Amphibian Species of the World 5.6" lists 81 species.[1]

These frogs have long toes with strong webbing between them, enabling the animals to slow their fall to a glide. They are therefore among the anurans commonly known as "flying frogs".

The present genus is closely related to Polypedates, which in former times was often included in Rhacophorus. Even today, it is not fully resolved in which of these genera "P." feae and the Chinese flying frog ("R." dennysi) properly belong, and the supposedly new species "P. pingbianensis" has turned out to be the same as R. duboisi.

Reproduction[edit]

These frogs lay their eggs in aerial foam nests; upon hatching, tadpoles drop to the water under the nest and complete their development there.[2][3]

Species[edit]

There are 82 species in the genus:[1][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Frost, Darrel R. (2013). "Rhacophorus". Amphibian Species of the World 5.6, an Online Reference. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 15 April 2013. 
  2. ^ Grosjean, S.; Delorme, M.; Dubois, A.; Ohler, A. (2008). "Evolution of reproduction in the Rhacophoridae (Amphibia, Anura)". Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research 46 (2): 169. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0469.2007.00451.x.  edit
  3. ^ Li, Jiatang; Dingqi Rao; Robert W. Murphy; Yaping Zhang (2011). "The systematic status of rhacophorid frogs". Asian Herpetological Research 2: 1–11. doi:10.3724/SP.J.1245.2011.00001. 
  4. ^ a b Rowley, J. J. L.; Tran, D. T. A.; Hoang, H. D.; Le, D. T. T. (2012). "A new species of large flying frog (Rhacophoridae: Rhacophorus) from lowland forests in southern Vietnam". Journal of Herpetology 46 (4): 480–487. doi:10.1670/11-261.  edit
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