Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Endemic to San Bernardino County, California.

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Senecio bernardinus Greene:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 15–30+ cm; fibrous-rooted (caudices branched, erect to suberect). Stems 1 (per rosette, rosettes clustered), lanate-tomentose to glabrescent. Basal leaves (and proximal cauline) petiolate; blades obovate to broadly spatulate, 5–20+ × 10–15 mm, bases tapering, margins subentire or dentate apically (faces lanate-tomentose to glabrescent). Cauline leaves gradually reduced (sessile; spatulate to linear, densely tomentose). Heads 2–8+ in compact cymiform arrays. Peduncles bracteate, densely lanate-tomentose. Calyculi 0. Phyllaries 13 or 21, green, 6–8 mm, lanate-tomentose, glabrate distally. Ray florets 8 or 13; corolla laminae 8–10 mm. Disc florets 35–50+; corolla tubes 2–2.5 mm, limbs 2–2.5 mm. Cypselae 0.75–1 mm, glabrous or hispid on ribs; pappi 3–4 mm. 2n = 46.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Senecio bernardinus Greene, Pittonia 3: 298. 1898; S. bernardinus var. sparsilobatus (Parish) Greenman; S. ionophyllus Greene var. bernardinus (Greene) H. M. Hall; S. ionophyllus var. sparsilobatus (Parish) H. M. Hall; S. sparsilobatus Parish
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Type Information

Isotype for Senecio bernardinus Greene
Catalog Number: US 48816
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): S. B. Parish & W. F. Parish
Year Collected: 1882
Locality: Banks of Santa Ana River., San Bernardino, California, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 1981 to 1981
  • Isotype: Greene, E. L. 1898. Pittonia. 3: 298.
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Type collection for Senecio sparsilobatus Parish
Catalog Number: US 444995
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. Wilder
Year Collected: 1904
Locality: Trail from Barton Flats to south fork of Santa Ana River, San Bernardino Mts.; alt. 7000 ft., San Bernardino, California, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 2134 to 2134
  • Type collection: Parish, S. B. 1904. Bot. Gaz. 38: 462.
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Isotype for Senecio bernardinus Greene
Catalog Number: US 782534
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): S. B. Parish
Year Collected: 1882
Locality: Bear Valley, San Bernardino Mts., San Bernardino, California, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Greene, E. L. 1898. Pittonia. 3: 298.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Open areas within coniferous forests (Yellow Pine Forest, Red Fir Forest), including meadows (often mesic, sometimes alkaline), dry rocky slopes, and pebble plain habitats (areas of dense clay soils armored by a lag gravel of quartzite pebbles that form openings of low cover and are dominated by herbaceous, cushion-forming species). 1800 - 2300 m.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: Thirty-five EOs (one extirpated, 12 historic and some of those are likely extirpated due to development).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: Endemic to California, Packera bernardina (syn. Senecio bernardinus) is known from fewer than 34 extant occurrences in San Bernardino County. One EO confirmed extirpated. Threats include development, grazing and vehicle use.

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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Threats

Degree of Threat: High

Comments: Threats include a variety of recreational activities, development, grazing, vehicle use, and nonnative species. Some sites within mining claims.

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Wikipedia

Packera bernardina

Packera bernardina is a rare species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name San Bernardino ragwort. It is endemic to the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California, where it is known from about twenty occurrences. It grows in mountain pine forests and the unique pebble plain habitat type of the local region.[1][2]

It is a perennial herb growing 30 to 50 centimeters in maximum height from a branching caudex and a rosette of basal leaves; several rosettes, each with a stem, may be clustered together. The spatula-shaped leaves have small squared oval blades with toothed edges which are borne on the ends of long petioles. Smaller, simpler leaves occur farther up the stem. The leaves are coated in a very short layer of woolly hairs.

The inflorescence contains several flower heads, each lined with hairy green phyllaries. The head contains many golden yellow disc florets and generally either 8 or 13 yellow ray florets each up to a centimeter long. The fruit is an achene with a body about a millimeter long tipped with a pappus of 3 or 4 millimeters.

References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Packera bernardina is known only from the San Bernardino Mountains and has been collected most frequently from Bear Valley.
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