Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Aster prenanthoides fo. prenanthoides :
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Aster prenanthoides Muhl. ex Willd.:
China (Asia)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 20–90(–120) cm, colonial; long-rhizomatous. Stems 1(–3+), ascending to erect (usually flexuous, sometimes ± straight, sometimes stout, older often dark purple), glabrous proximally, moderately hirsute distally. Leaves thin, margins scabrous, apices mucronate, abaxial faces glabrous, midveins hispid to glabrate, adaxial scabrous; basal withering by flowering, petiolate (petioles slender or slightly winged, bases reddish, dilated, sheathing, ciliate), blades obovate to oblanceolate, 15–70 × 10–20 mm, bases attenuate, margins crenate-serrate, apices acute to obtuse; proximalmost cauline withering by flowering, proximal mostly persistent, petiolate to subpetiolate (petioles ± widely winged, bases dilated, strongly auriculate-clasping), blades ovate to lance-ovate or elliptic-lanceolate to oblanceolate, 80–160(–200) × 15–55 mm, progressively reduced distally, bases attenuate, margins sharply serrate (teeth mucronulate), apices acuminate to subcaudate; distal subpetiolate or sessile (petioles broadly winged, auriculate-clasping), blades oblanceolate to lanceolate, sometimes panduriform, 7–90 × 2–25 mm, progressively reduced distally, more sharply so on branches, bases attenuate (petiolate) or ± cuneate to auriculate-clasping and slightly constricted above auricles (panduriform), margins serrate or entire. Heads in broad, ± flat, corymbo-paniculiform arrays, branches often purplish, divaricate to ascending, slender. Peduncles (8–)10–40 mm, sparsely to densely hispid, bracts lanceolate to linear-lanceolate, 3–12 mm, somewhat grading into phyllaries. Involucres campanulate, 5–6 mm. Phyllaries in 4–6 series, oblong-lanceolate or -oblanceolate, slightly constricted near middle (outer) to linear-lanceolate or linear (inner), ± unequal (flexible), bases indurate 1 / 5 – 1 / 2 , margins ± narrowly hyaline, scarious, erose, sometimes ciliolate distally, green zones lanceolate to linear-lanceolate (inner), often distally foliaceous, sometimes outer ± entirely so, apices spreading to ± squarrose, acute to acuminate, mucronulate, abaxial faces sparsely hirsutulous to glabrate or glabrous, adaxial glabrous or sparsely hirsutulous. Ray florets 17–25(–30); corollas usually lavender to blue, rarely white, laminae 7.5–12(–15) × 1–2 mm. Disc florets 39–50(–65); corollas cream colored or light yellow becoming purple or brown, 3.5–5 mm, tubes ± equaling campanulate to funnelform throats (thinly puberulent), lobes triangular, 0.5–1 mm. Cypselae dull purple or stramineous with purple streaks or purplish-tinged, cylindro-oblanceoloid to obovoid, ± compressed, 2–3(–3.5) mm, 4–6-nerved, faces sparsely to moderately strigillose; pappi sordid, 3.5–4.5 mm. 2n = 32.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Aster prenanthoides Muhlenberg ex Willdenow, Sp. Pl. 3: 2046. 1803
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Ecology

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Zig-Zag Aster in Illinois

Aster prenanthoides (Zig-Zag Aster)
(Bees collect pollen or suck nectar; flies & beetles feed on pollen or suck nectar; other insects suck nectar; all observations are from Graenicher.)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn; Apidae (Bombini): Bombus vagans sn; Anthophoridae (Ceratinini): Ceratina dupla dupla sn; Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Melissodes rustica sn cp; Anthophoridae (Xylocopini): Xylocopa virginica sn; Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile cetuncularis sn cp

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon sericea sn, Augochlorella striata sn cp, Halictus confusus sn cp, Halictus rubicunda sn, Lasioglossum forbesii sn, Lasioglossum versatus cp, Lasioglossum zephyrus sn; Colletidae (Colletinae): Colletes americana sn, Colletes eulophi sn cp; Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena asteris sn cp olg, Andrena hirticincta sn cp olg; Andrenidae (Panurginae): Heterosarus rudbeckiae sn

Wasps
Sphecidae (Bembicinae): Bembix americana; Sphecidae (Crabroninae): Ectemnius decemmaculatus, Ectemnius maculosus; Vespidae: Polistes fuscata; Vespidae (Eumeninae): Ancistrocerus adiabatus, Ancistrocerus antilope; Ichneumonidae: Pimpla pedalis

Flies
Syrphidae: Eristalinus aeneus, Eristalis anthophorina, Eristalis dimidiatus, Eristalis flavipes, Eristalis tenax, Eristalis transversus, Helophilus fasciatus, Orthonevra pictipennis, Spilomyia longicornis, Spilomyia sayi, Syrphus ribesii, Toxomerus geminatus, Toxomerus marginatus, Tropidia quadrata; Scathophagidae: Scathophaga furcata; Anthomyiidae: Phorbia sp.; Calliphoridae: Lucilia illustris, Lucilia sericata; Muscidae: Graphomya maculata, Stomoxys calcitrans; Sarcophagidae: Sarcophaga sp.; Tachinidae: Archytas analis, Cylindromyia dosiades, Gymnoclytia immaculata, Phasia subopaca, Spallanzania hesperidarum, Tachinomyia panaetius

Butterflies
Nymphalidae: Vanessa atalanta, Vanessa virginiensis; Pieridae: Colias philodice, Pieris rapae; Lycaenidae: Celastrina argiolus

Moths
Noctuidae: Anagrapha falcifera

Beetles
Chrysomelidae: Acalymma vittata, Diabrotica undecimpunctata; Melyridae: Attalus terminalis; Mordellidae: Mordellistena comata

Plant Bugs
Miridae: Lygus lineolaris

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Symphyotrichum prenanthoides

Symphyotrichum prenanthoides is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name crookedstem aster. It is native to eastern North America, where it occurs in eastern Canada and the eastern United States.[1]

This rhizomatous perennial herb produces colonies of plants with stems that may exceed one meter in length. They grow upright to erect and may be crooked or nearly straight. They are often thick and purple in color with age. The leaves vary in size and shape. The flower heads are borne in branching arrays on purplish stems. The ray florets are lavender or blue in color, or sometimes white. There are up to 30 ray florets measuring up to 1.5 centimeters in length. At the center are disc florets in shades of cream and yellow to purple or brown.[2]

This plant grows in many types of habitat including woody and marshy areas, as well as roadsides.[2]

The Iroquois used this plant medicinally to treat fevers in babies and other ailments.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Symphyotrichum prenanthoides. NatureServe.
  2. ^ a b Symphyotrichum prenanthoides. Flora of North America.
  3. ^ Symphyotrichum prenanthoides. University of Michigan Ethnobotany.
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Notes

Comments

Symphyotrichum prenanthoides is of conservation concern in Canada and in a number of states.
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