Overview

Comprehensive Description

Symphyotrichum lateriflorum (L.) A . Loeve & D. Loeve

Distribution

In a wide variety of dry to moist habitats.

Notes

Sep–Nov . Not seen in Shaken Creek Preserve by the senior author. Specimens seen in the vicinity: Sandy Run [Neck]: LeBlond 2590 (NCU!; as Symphyotrichum lateriflorum var. lateriflorum ). [< Aster lateriflorus (L.) Britton sensu RAB; = FNA; < Symphyotrichum lateriflorum (L.) Á . Löve & D. Löve various varieties sensu Weakley]

  • Thornhill, Robert, Krings, Alexander, Lindbo, David, Stucky, Jon (2014): Guide to the Vascular Flora of the Savannas and Flatwoods of Shaken Creek Preserve and Vicinity (Pender & Onslow Counties, North Carolina, U. S. A.). Biodiversity Data Journal 2, 1099: 1099-1099, URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1099
Public Domain

Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments

This aster is more attractive in woodland areas, where it has a delicate appearance. It closely resembles Aster pilosus (Frost Aster), Aster ericoides (Heath Aster), and other species in the genus with small white flowerheads. The Calico Aster (Aster lateriflorus) is a somewhat lanky plant with smaller flowerheads (about 1/3" across) and fewer ray florets per flowerhead (about 10) than many similar asters (Aster spp.). In this regard, it is similar to the Heath Aster, but the latter species is a more compact plant with leaves that are shorter and more narrow than those of the Calico Aster. While the Heath Aster is often found in open prairies, the Calico Aster usually doesn't stray far from woodland and semi-shaded wetland areas. Its common name refers to the diverse colors of the disk florets as they mature. Another common name of this species is the Side-Flowering Aster, and an alternative scientific name is Symphyotrichum lateriflorum
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This is a perennial plant about 1-3' tall that branches occasionally, often leaning toward one side. The stems are light green or reddish brown, and they have lines of white hairs. The alternate leaves are up to 4½" long and ½" across, becoming much smaller as they ascend the stems. They are narrowly lanceolate, oblanceolate, or elliptic, becoming linear near the flowerheads. There are usually a few teeth toward the tips of the larger leaves, otherwise they have smooth margins. Some hairs may be present along the major veins on the undersides of the leaves. The upper leaf surface is medium green, while the lower leaf surface is light green. The upper stems and some of the side stems produce panicles of flowerheads up to 10" long and 6" across. Each flowerhead has numerous small disk florets that are surrounded by about 8-12 ray florets. The corollas of the disk florets are initially pale yellow, but they later become brown or reddish purple; they are short-tubular in shape and 5-lobed. The petaloid rays are white and linear-oblong in shape. A typical flowerhead is about 1/3" (8 mm.) across. Each flowerhead is subtended by small green bracts (phyllaries) that are appressed together, or they are only slightly spreading. The blooming period occurs from late summer to the fall, lasting about 1-2 months. There is little or no floral scent. The small achenes are slightly pubescent and they have small tufts of white hair. Distribution of the achenes is by wind. The root system is fibrous and rhizomatous; an older plant may develop a small caudex. Clonal offsets occasionally develop from the rhizomes. This plant occasionally forms colonies at favorable sites.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 20–120(–150) cm, ces­pitose; with short, woody, branched caudices, or short-rhizom­atous. Stems 1–5+, ascending to erect (± arching, slender, brittle), ± densely pilose or villous to glabrate or glabrous (particularly proximally). Leaves thin, mem­branous, margins serrate to serrulate, scabridulous, apices acute to acuminate, sometimes caudate, mucronulate, abaxial faces glabrous, midveins usually ± densely pilose to glabrate, rarely glabrous, adaxial scabrous (short-strigose) to glabrate; basal usually withering by flowering, sometimes persisting (new vernal rosettes often developing at flowering), petiolate to subpetiolate (petioles narrowly to ± broadly winged, ciliate, bases ± sheathing), blades oblanceolate, lance-ovate or ovate to spatulate or suborbiculate, 5–35 × 7–25 mm, abruptly attenuate, margins crenate-serrate, apices obtuse to rounded or acute; proximal cauline mostly withering by flowering, sessile or subpetiolate (petioles broadly winged), blades usually ovate or elliptic to elliptic-oblanceolate or lanceolate, rarely linear-lanceolate, (30–)50–100(–150) × (2–)10–20(–35) mm, greatly reduced distally, bases attenuate to cuneate; distal sessile, blades ovate, lance-ovate, lance-elliptic, or oblanceolate to lance-linear or linear, 10–150 × 1–30 mm, progressively reduced distally, branch leaves abruptly smaller, bases cuneate, margins sometimes entire. Heads in ample, open, diffuse, ± pyramidal, paniculiform arrays, branches divaricate to long-arching or ± ascending, slender, wiry, secund; usually sessile, sometimes peduncles 0.1–1 cm+, ± pilose, bracts 1–7, linear or subulate to oblong-lanceolate, foliaceous, grading into phyllaries. Involucres cylindro-campanulate, (3.5–)4–6(–7) mm. Phyllaries in 3–4(–6) series, appressed or slightly spreading, oblong-lanceolate or -oblanceoalte (outer) to linear (inner), unequal, bases indurate 1 / 3 – 2 / 3 , margins scarious, erose, hyaline or sometimes reddish, ± ciliolate, green zones lanceolate to ± diamond-shaped, apices (outer) acute, callus-pointed, (mid) acute to acuminate, or obtuse, sometimes purplish, abaxial faces glabrous (outer), mid sparsely puberulent. Ray florets 8–15(–23); corollas white, rarely pinkish or purplish, laminae (3–)4–5(–8) × 0.9–1.2 mm. Disc florets 8–16(–20); corollas cream to light yellow turning pink or reddish purple, (2.5–)3–5 mm, tubes shorter than funnelform-campanulate throats, lobes strongly reflexed, lanceolate, 0.9–1.7 mm. Cypselae gray or tan, oblong-obovoid, sometimes ± compressed, (1.3–)1.8–2.2 mm, 3–5-nerved, faces sparsely strigillose; pappi white to pinkish, 3–4 mm. 2n = 16, 32, 48.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Solidago lateriflora Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 879. 1753; Aster lateriflorus (Linnaeus) Britton
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 4 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 1
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Faunal Associations

The florets of Calico Aster have shorter nectar tubes than many other species of asters, and they seem to attract a wide variety of insects, particularly in sunny areas. More common insect visitors include short-tongued bees, wasps, and flies, and less common visitors include long-tongued bees, small butterflies, skippers, beetles, and plant bugs. These insects seek nectar primarily, although the short-tongued bees may collect pollen, while some beetles and flies feed on the pollen. Caterpillars of the butterflies, Chlosyne nycteis (Silvery Checkerspot) and Phyciodes tharos (Pearl Crescent), feed on the foliage of asters (Aster spp.), as do the caterpillars of many kinds of moths (see Moth Table). The White-Tailed Deer and Cottontail Rabbit browse on the foliage occasionally. Photographic Location
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Flower-Visiting Insects of Calico Aster in Illinois

Aster lateriflorus (Calico Aster)
(Bees suck nectar or collect pollen; other insects suck nectar; observations are from Graenicher and Krombein et al. as indicated below, otherwise they are from Robertson)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn fq; Apidae (Bombini): Bombus griseocallis sn (Gr), Bombus impatiens sn cp fq, Bombus pensylvanica sn cp, Bombus vagans sn; Anthophoridae (Ceratinini): Ceratina calcarata sn, Ceratina dupla dupla sn cp (Rb, Gr); Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Melissodes rustica sn cp; Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile centuncularis sn (Gr), Megachile latimanus sn cp, Megachile mendica sn cp

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon sericea sn (Gr), Agapostemon virescens sn cp (Rb, Gr), Augochlora purus purus sn (Rb, Gr), Augochlorella aurata sn, Augochlorella striata sn cp (Rb, Gr), Augochloropsis metallica metallica sn, Halictus spp. (Lasioglossum spp.) sn (Gr), Halictus confusus sn cp (Gr), Halictus rubicunda sn (Gr), Lasioglossum connexus sn cp (Gr), Lasioglossum coriaceus sn (Rb, Gr), Lasioglossum forbesii sn (Gr), Lasioglossum fuscipennis sn, Lasioglossum tegularis sn (Gr), Lasioglossum versatus sn, Lasioglossum zephyrus sn cp (Gr), Paralictus platyparius sn; Halictidae (Sphecodini): Sphecodes cressonii sn (Gr), Sphecodes stygius sn (Gr); Colletidae (Colletinae): Colletes americana sn cp (Rb, Gr), Colletes compactus sn cp fq; Colletidae (Hylaeinae): Hylaeus affinis sn (Gr), Hylaeus modestus modestus sn (Gr); Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena hirticincta sn cp olg (Gr), Andrena nubecula sn cp olg, Andrena placata (Kr), Andrena simplex sn cp olg (Rb, Kr); Andrenidae (Panurginae): Heterosarus andrenoides sn cp, Heterosarus compositarum sn cp

Wasps
Sphecidae (Crabroninae): Crabro tumidus, Ectemnius continuus (Gr), Ectemnius lapidarius (Gr), Ectemnius maculosus (Gr); Sphecidae (Philanthinae): Cerceris nigrescens (Gr), Philanthus gibbosus (Gr); Sphecidae (Sphecinae): Ammophila procera, Isodontia philadelphica (Gr); Vespidae: Dolichovespula arenaria (Gr), Dolichovespula maculata (Rb, Gr), Polistes annularis fq, Polistes fuscata (Rb, Gr) fq, Vespula germanica (Rb, Gr); Vespidae (Eumeninae): Ancistrocerus adiabatus (Rb, Gr), Ancistrocerus antilope (Rb, Gr), Ancistrocerus campestris, Eumenes fraterna (Rb, Gr), Euodynerus foraminatus (Rb, Gr), Leionotus scrophulariae (Rb, MS), Stenodynerus anormis, Symmorphus canadensis; Pompilidae: Anoplius aethiops (Gr), Anoplius lepidus (Gr), Anoplius marginatus (Gr); Sapygidae: Sapyga interrupta (Gr); Braconidae: Agathis perforator (Gr); Ichneumonidae: Dolichomitus pteralas (Gr)

Flies
Syrphidae: Epistrophe emarginata, Eristalis arbustorum (Gr), Eristalis tenax (Gr), Eristalis transversus, Eupeodes americanus, Helophilus fasciatus (Rb, Gr), Ocyptamus fuscipennis, Paragus bicolor (Gr), Sericomyia chrysotoxoides, Spilomyia longicornis (Rb, Gr), Spilomyia sayi, Syritta pipiens (Gr), Syrphus ribesii (Gr), Syrphus torvus, Toxomerus geminatus (Gr), Toxomerus marginatus (Gr), Toxomerus politus (Gr); Conopidae: Zodion americanum (Gr); Tachinidae: Archytas analis (Rb, Gr), Archytas aterrima fq, Chaetogaedia analis (Gr), Copecrypta ruficauda, Cylindromyia dosiades (Gr), Eumea caesar (Gr), Gymnoclytia immaculata (Gr), Gymnoclytia occidua, Leskiomima prima (Rb, MS), Leucostoma simplex (Gr), Myiopharus doryphorae (Gr), Tachinomyia panaetius (Gr); Muscidae: Graphomya maculata (Gr), Morellia micans (Gr), Musca domestica (Gr), Neomyia cornicina (Rb, Gr), Stomoxys calcitrans (Gr); Calliphoridae: Calliphora vicina (Gr), Lucilia illustris fq (Rb, Gr), Pollenia rudis (Gr); Sarcophagidae: Helicobia rapax (Gr), Sarcophaga sp. (Gr); Anthomyiidae: Anthomyia sp. (Gr), Phorbia sp. (Gr)

Butterflies
Nymphalidae: Limenitis arthemis astyanax; Pieridae: Pieris rapae (Gr); Lycaenidae: Celastrina argiolus (Gr)

Moths
Noctuidae: Anagrapha falcifera (Gr); Sesiidae: Cisseps fulvicollis (Rb, Gr)

Beetles
Carabidae (Lebiini): Lebia atriventris (Gr); Chrysomelidae: Diabrotica undecimpunctata (Gr), Diabrotica virgifera (Gr)

Plant Bugs
Miridae: Adelphocoris rapidus (Gr), Leptoterna dolobrata (Gr), Lygus lineolaris (Gr); Thyreocoridae: Galgupha atra (Gr)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Symphyotrichum lateriflorum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Symphyotrichum lateriflorum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 10
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is light shade to partial sun and moist conditions. Full sun is tolerated if the site is not too dry. Growth is best in rich organic soil, or a moisture retaining clay-loam. During dry weather, the lower leaves often wither away, and stressed out plants are vulnerable to many kinds of foliar disease. Range & Habitat
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Symphyotrichum lateriflorum

Symphyotrichum lateriflorum (common name calico aster) is a species of flowering plant in the daisy family Asteraceae, native to eastern North America. In the British Isles it is still widely referenced under its old name, Aster lateriflorus syn. A. diffusus, A. vimineus.[1]

Description[edit]

Growing to 120 cm (47 in) tall by 30 cm (12 in) wide, S. lateriflorum is a clump-forming herbaceous perennial with alternate, simple leaves on stiff, hairy, purplish stems. Small white or pale lilac composite daisy-like flowers are borne in corymbs up to 15 cm (6 in) across in late summer and fall (autumn).

Cultivation[edit]

Like other asters, this plant is valued in gardens for providing late colour after the main flowering season has finished. The cultivars S. lateriflorum var. horizontale[2] and 'Coombe Fishacre'[3] have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

References[edit]

  1. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  2. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Aster laterifolius var. horizontalis". Retrieved 17 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Aster 'Coombe Fishacre'". Retrieved 17 July 2013. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Symphyotrichum lateriflorum has been reported in British Columbia as an ephemeral that did not persist. G. L. Nesom (1994b) and J. C. Semple et al. (2002) recognized several varieties within the complex: var. lateriflorum (syn. Aster vimineus Lamarck); var. angustifolium (Wiegand) G. L. Nesom (syn. A. lateriflorus var. angustifolius Wiegand); var. flagellare (Shinners) G. L. Nesom (syn. A. lateriflorus var. flagellaris Shinners, A. lateriflorus var. indutus Shinners); var. hirsuticaule (Lindley ex de Candolle) G. L. Nesom [syn. A. hirsuticaulis Lindley ex de Candolle, A. lateriflorus var. hirsuticaulis (Lindley ex de Candolle) Porter]; var. horizontale (Desfontaines) G. L. Nesom [syn. A. horizontalis Desfontaines, A. lateriflorus var. horizontalis (Desfontaines) Farwell]; var. spatelliforme (E. S. Burgess) G. L. Nesom [syn. A. spatelliformis E. S. Burgess, A. lateriflorus var. spatelliformis (E. S. Burgess) A. G. Jones]; and var. tenuipes (Wiegand) G. L. Nesom (syn. A. lateriflorus var. tenuipes Wiegand, A. acadiensis Shinners). Much genetic and phenotypic variation is encountered within the complex; a thorough study is needed before a coherent taxonomy can be achieved.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: This species is synonymous with Aster lateriflorus as recognized by Kartesz (1994) except that plants of the northeastern U.S. and eastern Canada sometimes called Aster tradescantii are now treated as a distinct species (Symphyotrichum tradescantii). Kartesz (1994) had treated them within this species. This species concept includes Aster vimineus in the strict sense of Lam. (not including vars. saxatilis or subdumosus).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!