Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / gall
Brachycaudus helichrysi causes gall of leaves (terminal) of Lithospermum

Foodplant / gall
larva of Dasineura lithospermi causes gall of shoot tip of Lithospermum

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Known predators

Lithospermum (gromwell (forb/shrub)) is prey of:
Bos taurus
Calcarius mccownii
Calamospiza melanocorys

Based on studies in:
USA: California, Cabrillo Point (Grassland)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • L. D. Harris and L. Paur, A quantitative food web analysis of a shortgrass community, Technical Report No. 154, Grassland Biome. U.S. International Biological Program (1972), from p. 17.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:98
Specimens with Sequences:68
Specimens with Barcodes:54
Species:22
Species With Barcodes:19
Public Records:34
Public Species:15
Public BINs:0
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Lithospermum

Lithospermum is a genus of plants belonging to the family Boraginaceae. The genus is distributed nearly worldwide, but most are native to the Americas and the center of diversity is in the southwestern United States and Mexico.[1] Species are known generally as gromwells or stoneseeds.

Some species, such as Lithospermum arvense, are sometimes classified in the genus Buglossoides, but that genus is subsumed into Lithospermum by works such as the Flora of China.[2] In addition, a 2010 molecular study showed that the genus Onosmodium should be included within Lithospermum.[1]

The dried root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon is a Chinese herbal medicine with various antiviral and biological activities, including inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).[3][4] Lithospermum purpurocaeruleum is native to Japan, where it has been traditionally been used to make a purple dye.

Lithospermum leaves are eaten by the caterpillars of certain Lepidoptera, such as the moth Ethmia pusiella which has been recorded on L. officinale.

Diversity[edit]

There are about 50[2] to 60[5] species in the genus.

Species include:[2][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cohen, J. I. and J. I. Davis. (2009). Nomenclatural changes in Lithospermum (Boraginaceae) and related taxa following a reassessment of phylogenetic relationships. Brittonia 61(2), 101-11.
  2. ^ a b c "Lithospermum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 132. 1753.". Flora of China. 
  3. ^ Chen, X., et al. (2003). Shikonin, a component of Chinese herbal medicine, inhibits chemokine receptor function and suppresses human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 47(9), 2810-16.
  4. ^ Gao, H., et al. (2011). Anti-adenovirus activities of shikonin, a component of Chinese herbal medicine in vitro. Biol Pharm Bull. 34(2) 197-202.
  5. ^ Cohen, J. I., (2012). Comparative floral development in Lithospermum (Boraginaceae) and implications for the evolution and development of heterostyly. American Journal of Botany 99(5), 797-805.
  6. ^ GRIN Species Records of Lithospermum. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN).
  7. ^ Lithospermum. USDA PLANTS: North American species.
  8. ^ a b c d e Weigend, M., et al. (2010). Five new species of Lithospermum L.(Boraginaceae tribe Lithospermeae) in Andean South America: another radiation in the Amotape-Huancabamba zone. Taxon 59(4), 1161-79.
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