Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
colony of Albugo candida parasitises live, discoloured, distorted leaf of Alyssum
Remarks: season: spring, early autumn

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:10Public Records:2
Specimens with Sequences:9Public Species:2
Specimens with Barcodes:9Public BINs:0
Species:6         
Species With Barcodes:6         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Alyssum

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Wikipedia

Alyssum

For sweet alyssum, see Lobularia maritima.

Alyssum is a genus of about 100–170 species of flowering plants in the family Brassicaceae, native to Europe, Asia, and northern Africa, with the highest species diversity in the Mediterranean region. The genus comprises annual and perennial herbaceous plants or (rarely) small shrubs, growing to 10–100 cm tall, with oblong-oval leaves and yellow or white flowers (pink to purple in a few species).

The genera Lobularia and Aurinia are closely related to Alyssum and were formerly included in it. The widely cultivated species popularly known as "sweet alyssum" is Lobularia maritima. The common rockery plant is Aurinia saxatilis.

Alyssum foliage is used as food by the caterpillars of certain Lepidoptera, including the Gem (Orthonama obstipata). However, rabbits will not eat it.[1]

Selected species[edit]

Formerly included[edit]

References[edit]

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