Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Datana ministra

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 15
Specimens with Barcodes: 35
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Datana ministra

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 14 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNGGAATTTGAGCAGGAATAGTAGGAACTTCATTAAGATTATTAATTCGAGCAGAATTAGGTAATCCTGGATCTTTAATTGGAGATGATCAAATTTATAATACTATTGTTACAGCCCATGCTTTTATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTAATACCTATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGAAATTGATTAGTTCCTTTAATATTAGGAGCCCCAGATATAGCATTTCCTCGTATAAATAATATAAGTTTTTGACTATTACCTCCTTCTTTAACTCTTTTAATTTCAAGAAGAATTGTAGAAAATGGAGCAGGAACTGGATGAACAGTTTACCCCCCACTTTCATCTAATATTGCCCATGGAGGAAGATCAGTTGATTTAGCTATTTTTTCTTTACATTTAGCTGGAATCTCTTCTATTTTAGGAGCAATTAACTTTATTACAACAATTATTAATATACGACTTAATAATATATCTTTTGATCAAATACCTTTATTTGTTTGAGCTGTTGGAATTACAGCTTTCTTATTACTTTTATCTTTACCAGTTTTAGCTGGAGCAATTACTATATTATTAACTGATCGAAATTTAAATACTTCTTTTTTTGACCCTGCTGGAGGAGGAGATCCAATTTTATACCAACATTTATTT
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Datana ministra

The Yellownecked Caterpillar (Datana ministra) is a moth of the Notodontidae family. It is found in southern Canada and the United States east of the Rocky Mountains, in the south-west it ranges to California.[2]

The wingspan is about 42 mm. There is one generation per year.

The larvae feed on Malus, Quercus, Betula and Salix species. Young larvae skeletonise the leaves of their host plant. Later, they feed on all of the leaf except the leaf stalk. They feed in groups. The larvae are yellowish and black striped and covered with fine, white hairs. The head is black. Full-grown larvae are about 50 mm long. Mature larvae drop to the soil to pupate underground, where they spend the winter.[3]

Subspecies[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]


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