Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (200,000-2,500,000 square km (about 80,000-1,000,000 square miles)) Gulf Coast region from Texas to much of Florida, then up the coast to northeastern North Carolina. Also southern Delaware (larval photo in 2004), southern New Jersey, and formerly Long Island, New York. So presumably occurs in coastal Virginia, Maryland.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: North of Florida at least this eems to be mainly a species of swamp forests,including apparently cypress swamps, white cedar swamps and hardwood swamps. Often the exact habitat locally is cunlear. the species probably occurs in a wider array of habitats in Florida.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Comments: The larva is apparently polyphagous as are most species in the familyy. Larvae have been found or reported on Decodon, live oak, cypress, white cedar and apparently Nyssa.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

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Global Abundance

Unknown

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Comments: NOrthward there seems to be one brood with adults in July in New Jersey and June in North Carolina. The species may be univoltine range-wide since Feguson (1978) reported that most collections are in May. Orgyia overwinter in spring.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Orgyia detrita

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: This species is known from relatively few sites north of Florida and even there the evidence to support Ferguson's conclusion that the species is common in the state is weak.
More information is needed to evaluate the status of this species northward. It does not appear to be restricted to any especially rare habitat but it is absent in most seemingly suitable places even in New Jersey which is often a stronghold for coastal plain rarities. There are certainly a few dozen occurrences and maybe hundreds or more. The species is not imminently imperiled but it is apparrently uncommon in most of its range.

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Global Short Term Trend: Unknown

Comments: The species has been collected relatively frequently in New Jersey since 2000, but whether this reflects any real increase as opposed to more light trapping in July in swamps in Cape May County is not known. If it is increasing, climate change would be a likely factor.

Global Long Term Trend: Unknown

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Unknown

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Management

Global Protection: Unknown whether any occurrences are appropriately protected and managed

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