Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
Discula coelomycetous anamorph of Apiognomonia errabunda causes spots on live leaf of Escallonia

Foodplant / spot causer
Cercspora anamorph of Cercospora causes spots on live leaf of Escallonia

Foodplant / sap sucker
hypophyllous Coccus hesperidum sucks sap of live leaf (near veins) of Escallonia
Remarks: season: 1-12

Foodplant / sap sucker
Parthenolecanium corni sucks sap of live shoot of Escallonia

Foodplant / spot causer
hypophyllous Ramularia anamorph of Ramularia causes spots on live leaf of Escallonia

Foodplant / spot causer
hypophyllous Septoria coelomycetous anamorph of Septoria sp. nov. causes spots on live leaf of Escallonia

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:12
Specimens with Sequences:12
Specimens with Barcodes:12
Species:8
Species With Barcodes:8
Public Records:7
Public Species:6
Public BINs:0
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Escallonia

Escallonia is a genus of 40-50 species of flowering plants of the Escalloniaceae family. Mostly evergreen shrubs (rarely small trees), they are native to South America.[1]

Cultivation[edit]

Widely cultivated and commonly used as a hedging plant, especially in coastal areas, escallonia grows about 30 cm (12 in) per year, reaching 1.5–3 m (5–10 ft) in height, with arching branches of small, oval, glossy green leaves. Flowering from June to October, it has masses of small pink or crimson flowers, with a honey fragrance. It is best grown in full sun with some shelter. Some varieties are not fully hardy in all areas.[2] Numerous cultivars and hybrids have been developed, of which the following have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit:-

  • 'Peach Blossom'[6]
  • 'Pride of Donard'[7]
  • 'Crimson Spire'[8]
A flowering Escallonia cultivar dominates the center of this cul-de-sac in Sidney, British Columbia.
A closer view of the cul-de-sac Escallonia shown above.

Selected Species[edit]

[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Royal Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Plants, Ed. Christopher Brickell, Dorling Kindersly, London, 1996. ISBN0751304360. p.419
  2. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  3. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Escallonia 'Apple Blossom'". Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  4. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Escallonia 'Donard Radiance'". Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  5. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Escallonia 'Iveyi'". Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  6. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Escallonia 'Peach Blossom'". Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  7. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Escallonia 'Pride of Donard'". Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  8. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Escallonia rubra 'Crimson Spire'". Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  9. ^ Flora Brasiliensis: Escallonia



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