Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Annual or perennial herbs. Leaves linear to ovate, simple; margin entire or ± dentate. Capitula heterogamous, radiate; ray florets female, in 1 series, often blue or violet; disk florets tubular, bisexual, yellow, their lobes spreading, sometimes with red margins. Phyllaries 3-4-seriate, imbricate; outer much shorter than inner. Achenes oblong, flattened, ± hairy and always glandular. Pappus hairs scabrid, whitish to yellowish, in 2, sometimes indistinct, rows.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Aster in Illinois

Aster sp. (Aster)
(beetle activity is unspecified; information is limited; this observation is from Lisberg & Young)

Beetles
Mordellidae: Mordellistena suturella (LY)

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Foodplant / pathogen
Aster Yellows infects and damages live, yellowed, mottled leaf of Callistephus chinensis

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Foodplant / pathogen
Aphelenchoides ritzemabosi infects and damages limp, discoloured leaf of Aster

Plant / resting place / within
puparium of Calycomyza humeralis may be found in leaf-mine of Aster

Foodplant / spot causer
Cercosporella anamorph of Cercosporella virgaureae causes spots on live leaf of Aster

Foodplant / miner
larva of Liriomyza eupatorii mines leaf of Aster
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / miner
larva of Liriomyza pusilla mines leaf of Aster
Other: minor host/prey

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / miner
larva of Liriomyza strigata mines leaf of Aster

Foodplant / miner
larva of Nemorimyza posticata mines leaf of Aster

Plant / resting place / within
puparium of Ophiomyia maura may be found in leaf of Aster

Foodplant / pathogen
Phialophora anamorph of Phialophora asteris infects and damages live leaf of Aster

Foodplant / saprobe
loosely gregarious, sometimes linearly arranged, covered then projecting pycnidium of Phomopsis coelomycetous anamorph of Phomopsis achilleae var. asteris is saprobic on dead stem of Aster

Foodplant / feeds on
Phytonemus pallidus feeds on live Aster
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / miner
larva of Trypeta zoe mines leaf of Aster

Foodplant / miner
larva of Vidalia spinifrons mines leaf of Aster

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:174
Specimens with Sequences:216
Specimens with Barcodes:83
Species:86
Species With Barcodes:86
Public Records:142
Public Species:76
Public BINs:0
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Aster (genus)

For other uses, see Aster (disambiguation).

Aster is a genus of flowering plants in the family Asteraceae. Its circumscription has been narrowed, and it now encompasses around 180 species, all but one of which are restricted to Eurasia; many species formerly in Aster are now in other genera of the tribe Astereae.

Circumscription[edit]

The genus Aster once contained nearly 600 species in Eurasia and North America, but after morphologic and molecular research on the genus during the 1990s, it was decided that the North American species are better treated in a series of other related genera. After this split there are roughly 180 species within the genus, all but one being confined to Eurasia.[3] The name Aster comes from the Ancient Greek word ἀστήρ (astér), meaning "star", referring to the shape of the flower head. Many species and a variety of hybrids and varieties are popular as garden plants because of their attractive and colourful flowers. Aster species are used as food plants by the larvae of a number of Lepidoptera species—see list of Lepidoptera that feed on Aster. Asters can grow in all hardiness zones.

The genus Aster is now generally restricted to the Old World species, with Aster amellus being the type species of the genus, as well as of the family Asteraceae.[1] The New World species have now been reclassified in the genera Almutaster, Canadanthus, Doellingeria, Eucephalus, Eurybia, Ionactis, Oligoneuron, Oreostemma, Sericocarpus and Symphyotrichum, though all are treated within the tribe Astereae. Regardless of the taxonomic change, all are still widely referred to as "asters" (popularly "Michaelmas daisies" because of their typical blooming period) in the horticultural trades. See the List of Aster synonyms for more information.

Some common North American species that have now been moved are:

The "China aster" is in the related genus Callistephus.

Species[edit]

Aster alpinus is the only species of Aster (sensu stricto) that grows natively in North America; it is found in mountains across the Northern Hemisphere.

In the United Kingdom, there are only two native members of the genus: goldilocks, which is very rare, and Aster tripolium, the sea aster. Aster alpinus spp. vierhapperi is the only species native to North America.[2]

Some common species are:

Hybrids and cultivars[edit]

(those marked agm have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit:-

  • Aster × frikartii (A. amellus × A. thomsonii) Frikart's aster[4]
    • Aster × frikartii 'Mönch'agm[5]
    • A. × frikartii 'Wunder von Stäfa'agm[6]
  • 'Kylie' (A. novae-angliae 'Andenken an Alma Pötschke' × A. ericoides 'White heather')[7]
  • 'Ochtendgloren'agm[8] (A. pringlei hybrid)
  • 'Photograph'agm[9]

In human culture[edit]

The Hungarian revolution of 31 October 1918, became known as the "Aster Revolution" due to protesters in Budapest wearing this flower.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Elizabeth Pennissi (2001). "Linnaeus's last stand?". Science 291 (5512): 2304–2307. doi:10.1126/science.291.5512.2304. PMID 11269295. 
  2. ^ a b Luc Brouillet. "Aster Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2 : 872. 1753; Gen. Pl. ed. 5, 373. 1754". p. 20.  Missing or empty |title= (help) in Flora of North America.
  3. ^ Luc Brouillet, Theodore M. Barkley & John L. Strother. "Asteraceae Martinov tribe Astereae Cassini, J. Phys. Chim. Hist. Nat. Arts. 88: 195. 1819". p. 3.  Missing or empty |title= (help) in Flora of North America.
  4. ^ Floridata: Aster × frikartii
  5. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Aster × frikartii 'Mönch". Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - A. × frikartii 'Wunder von Stäfa'". Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  7. ^ Klein, Carol. "Blazin' squad". Telegraph. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  8. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Aster 'Ochtendgloren'". Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  9. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Aster 'Photograph'". Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  10. ^ Hajdu, Tibor (1990). "Revolution, Counterrevolution, Consolidation". In Peter F. Sugar. A History of Hungary ([New printing]. ed.). Bloomington: Indiana University Press. p. 297. ISBN 0253355788. 

Bibliography[edit]

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