Physical Description

Type Information

Syntype for Arabis bolanderi S. Watson
Catalog Number: US 320455
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): H. N. Bolander
Year Collected: 1866
Locality: Yosemite National Park., California, United States, North America
  • Syntype: Watson, S. 1887. Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 22: 467.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Syntype for Arabis bolanderi S. Watson
Catalog Number: US 4092
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): T. S. Brandegee
Year Collected: 1883
Locality: Washington, United States, North America
  • Syntype: Watson, S. 1887. Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 22: 467.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / false gall
colony of Albugo candida causes swelling of live, discoloured, distorted leaf of Arabis
Remarks: season: spring, early autumn

Foodplant / pathogen
Arabis Mosaic virus infects and damages Arabis

Foodplant / gall
larva of Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma causes gall of stem (base) of Arabis

Foodplant / parasite
colony of sporangium of Peronospora parasitica parasitises live Arabis

Foodplant / spot causer
Turnip Mosaic virus causes spots on live leaf of Arabis

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:115Public Records:54
Specimens with Sequences:103Public Species:10
Specimens with Barcodes:102Public BINs:0
Species:22         
Species With Barcodes:21         
          
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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Arabis

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Wikipedia

Arabis

For the Royal New Zealand Navy corvette, see HMNZS Arabis (K 385).

Arabis /ˈɛərəbɨs/,[1] or rockcress, is a genus of flowering plants, within the family Brassicaceae, subfamily Brassicoideae.

Though traditionally recognized as a large genus with many Old World and New World members, more recent evaluations of the relationships among these species using genetic data suggest there are two major groups within the old genus Arabis. These two groups are not each other's closest relatives, so have been split into two separate genera. The Old World members all remain in the genus Arabis, whereas most of the New World members have been moved into the genus Boechera, with only a few remaining in Arabis.

The species are herbaceous, annual or perennial plants, growing to 10–80 cm tall, usually densely hairy, with simple entire to lobed leaves 1–6 cm long, and small white four-petalled flowers. The fruit is a long, slender capsule containing 10-20 or more seeds.

Some species, notably A. alpina, are cultivated as ornamental plants in gardens. Many others are regarded as weeds.

Selected species

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sunset Western Garden Book, 1995:606–607


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