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Unicolor cribo

The unicolor cribo (Drymarchon melanurus unicolor) is a Central American subspecies of the cribo snakes. The eastern indigo snake, Drymarchon corais couperi is another species of this genus. Until recently the unicolor cribo was considered a subspecies of the same species as the indigo snake Drymarchon corais unicolor.

Unlike the indigo snake, which is dark blue to almost black, the unicolor cribo has a yellow or golden color with black facial and neck bar-like markings.

This snake reaches a length of over nine feet. It is terrestrial and diurnal. It can be found in marshes, swamps, and riverbeds. The unicolor cribo is non-venomous. It bites its prey without coiling around it. It pins its prey, crushing it, and then swallows it whole. Its prey consists of other snakes, including venomous snakes, small mammals, small birds, lizards, frogs, fish, and other small vertebrate animals.

References[edit]

  • Savage, J.M. 1992. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Costa Rica. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.
  • Solorzano, Alejandro. 2004. Snakes of Costa Rica. INBio, Costa Rica.
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Drymarchon

Drymarchon is a genus of large nonvenomous colubrid snakes, commonly known as indigo snakes, endemic to the Southeastern United States, Central America, and South America. Three to four species are currently recognized.[2]

Contents

Description[edit]

Indigo snakes are large, robust snakes which can reach a length of over 3 m (9.8 ft). They have smooth dorsal scales with several color variations, including a glossy blue-black color.

Behavior and diet[edit]

Indigo snakes are diurnal and actively forage for prey. They feed on a broad variety of small animals such as rodents, birds, lizards, frogs, toads, and other snakes, including rattlesnakes. They are not aggressive snakes and will only bite when threatened. Typical threat display includes hissing and shaking of its tail as a warning.

Species[edit]

The genus Drymarchon was formerly considered to be a monotypic taxon formed by subspecies of D. corais. Currently the genus includes three distinct species recognized by ITIS:[2]

A fourth species, found in Venezuela, has been proposed by Wüster, Yrausquin, and Mijares-Urrutia:[5][6]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Wright, A.H., and A.A. Wright. 1957. Handbook of Snakes of the United States and Canada. Comstock. Ithaca and London. 1,105 pp. (in 2 volumes) (Drymarchon, p. 200.)
  2. ^ a b "Drymarchon". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2011-02-06. 
  3. ^ Hammerson, G.A (2007). "Drymarchon couperi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 8 February 2011. 
  4. ^ Lee, J., Calderón Mandujano, R., Lopez-Luna, M.A., Vasquez Díaz, J. & Quintero Díaz, G.E. (2007). "Drymarchon melanurus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.4. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 8 February 2011. 
  5. ^ Genus Drymarchon at The Reptile Database
  6. ^ Wüster, Wolfgang; José Luís Yrausquin and Abraham Mijares-Urrutia (2001). "A new species of indigo snake from north-western Venezuela (Serpentes: Colubridae: Drymarchon)". Herpetological Journal 11: 157–165. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Fitzinger, L. 1843. Systema Reptilium, Fasciculus Primus, Amblyglossae. Braumüller & Seidel. Vienna. 106 pp. (Drymarchon, p. 26.)
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