Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Agra Fabricius, 1801:224. Type-species: Agra aenea Fabricius 1801 :224, named first among three species described by Fabricius. Designated by Erwin (1982a) . Agridia Chaudoir, 1861:109. Type-species: Agridia platyscelis Chaudoir (1861: 109), named first among two species described by Chaudoir. Designated by Erwin (1982a) .

 

Diagnostic combination.

 

Elegant Canopy Beetles

 

During evolution toward a canopy domain and away from a likely under canopy sister group, Agra adults acquired numerous generic-level autapotypic features as follows: head elongate with prognathate mandibles, securiform labial ultimate palpomeres ( Erwin 1982a ), extended cranium, and constricted neck; prothorax elongate and tubular, plural sutures effaced; tarsomeres ( Erwin 1982a ) dilated with setiferous pads beneath, claws explanate and pectinate; elytron with latero-basal sinus and latero-apical callus, apex medially and laterally toothed or somewhat produced, apical margin truncate, sinuate, or medially lobed; and male venter variously adorned with setal or pubescent patches; female reproductive system adapted to egg-laying deep in substrate (telescopic) ( Erwin 2002 ) with (usually) stout, apically-armed with ensiform setae, stylomere 2. Defense system very large ( Erwin 1982 ). Size. ABL=6.0mm to 29.0mm; TW=1.5mm to 6.0mm.

 

Note.

 

For descriptions of species groups previously recognized, refer to ( Erwin (1996 , 1998 , 2002 ).

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Erwin, Terry L.

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Agra Fabricius, 1801:224. Type-species: Agra aenea Fabricius 1801 :224, named first among three species described by Fabricius. Designated by Erwin (1982a) . Agridia Chaudoir, 1861:109. Type-species: Agridia platyscelis Chaudoir (1861: 109), named first among two species described by Chaudoir. Designated by Erwin (1982a) .

 

Diagnostic combination.

 

Elegant Canopy Beetles

 

During evolution toward a canopy domain and away from a likely under canopy sister group, Agra adults acquired numerous generic-level autapotypic features as follows: head elongate with prognathate mandibles, securiform labial ultimate palpomeres ( Erwin 1982a ), extended cranium, and constricted neck; prothorax elongate and tubular, plural sutures effaced; tarsomeres ( Erwin 1982a ) dilated with setiferous pads beneath, claws explanate and pectinate; elytron with latero-basal sinus and latero-apical callus, apex medially and laterally toothed or somewhat produced, apical margin truncate, sinuate, or medially lobed; and male venter variously adorned with setal or pubescent patches; female reproductive system adapted to egg-laying deep in substrate (telescopic) ( Erwin 2002 ) with (usually) stout, apically-armed with ensiform setae, stylomere 2. Defense system very large ( Erwin 1982 ). Size. ABL=6.0mm to 29.0mm; TW=1.5mm to 6.0mm.

 

Note.

 

For descriptions of species groups previously recognized, refer to ( Erwin (1996 , 1998 , 2002 ).

License not applicable

Erwin, Terry L.

Source: Plazi.org

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Wikipedia

Agra (genus)

Agra is a genus of beetles in the family Carabidae, the ground beetles. There are over 500 described species, but there are well over 1000 specimens in collections that have not yet been described.[1] The common name elegant canopy beetles has been used for genus Agra.[1]

Beetles of this genus have narrow heads and long, constricted necks. The tarsomeres, or the "feet" of the beetle, are wide and equipped with pads, allowing the beetle to grip leaves as it moves about and rests on plants. Females have "telescopic" reproductive organs, which they use to deposit eggs deep in the substrate.[1]

Adults of some species are probably predators of other arthropods. Some have also been seen drinking sap and eating pollen. Adult beetles are nocturnal and attracted to lights. They rest on the undersides of leaves with their bodies aligned along the midrib, legs and antennae tucked in. The larvae develop in burrows and under tree bark, and are likely predatory.[1]

Adult beetles have anti-predator secretions that are offensive to predators; they have been noted to repel bats.[1]

Species include:[2]

References[edit]

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