Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

The female holotype measures 20 mm SVL. A conical papilla is present on the anterior quarter of the tongue. Head wider than long. Tympanum distinct, measuring just under half the diameter of the eye. Nostril equidistant from eye and tip of the snout. Interorbital space as broad as the upper eyelid. Limbs are short. Tibiotarsal articulation reaching the axilla, with the 4th toe extending beyond the tip of the snout. Fingertips barely dilated, without discs. Finger I shorter than Finger II. Toes free, slightly swollen at the tip but without actual discs. Sub-articular tubercles rather large, very prominent. Inner metatarsal tubercle is large, oval, very prominent, as long as the inner toe, and warty. Skin granular, dotted with small warts on the back, snout, and tibia. Posterior half of the posterior belly and thighs are covered with warts, while the throat, chest, and ventral surfaces of the tibia and tarsi are smooth. Males have thin spines along the inner edge of Fingers II and III, and a small disc of skin in the gular region (Angel 1950).

The reddish brown coloration resembles that of Arthroleptis poecilonotus; markings may or may not be present, and may consist of a triangular patch followed by two diamonds, with the posterior diamond being the larger of the two. The legs have traces of transverse bands. Throat, chest, and anterior belly are mottled with reddish brown. A thin white vertebral stripe, from snout to vent, may be present (Angel 1950).

Further research and field work needs to be done to determine the status of this species (Stuart et al 2008).

  • Angel, F. (1950). ''Arthroleptis crusculum et A. nimbaense. Batraciens nouveaux de Guinée française. (Matériaux de la Mission Lamotte aux Monts Nimba).'' Bulletin du Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, 22(5), 559-562.
  • Guibé, J. and Lamotte, M. (1958). ''Morphologie et reproduction par developpement direct d'un anoure du Mont Nimba, Arthroleptis crusculum Angel.'' Bulletin du Muséum National d’histoire Naturelle, Série 2, 20, 125-133.
  • Stuart, S., Hoffmann, M., Chanson, J., Cox, N., Berridge, R., Ramani, P., and Young, B. (eds) (2008). Threatened Amphibians of the World. Lynx Edicions, IUCN, and Conservation International, Barcelona, Spain; Gland, Switzerland; and Arlington, Virginia, USA.
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Distribution

Distribution and Habitat

Endemic to Mount Nimba, Guinea. It may also occur on the Liberian and Ivorian parts of Mount Nimba, but this has not been confirmed (Stuart et al. 2008). The elevational range of this species is 500-1,650 m asl (Angel 1950). Arthroleptis crusculum can be found in high altitude grasslands (savanna), on the edges of marshes and in gallery forest (Angel 1950).

  • Angel, F. (1950). ''Arthroleptis crusculum et A. nimbaense. Batraciens nouveaux de Guinée française. (Matériaux de la Mission Lamotte aux Monts Nimba).'' Bulletin du Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, 22(5), 559-562.
  • Guibé, J. and Lamotte, M. (1958). ''Morphologie et reproduction par developpement direct d'un anoure du Mont Nimba, Arthroleptis crusculum Angel.'' Bulletin du Muséum National d’histoire Naturelle, Série 2, 20, 125-133.
  • Stuart, S., Hoffmann, M., Chanson, J., Cox, N., Berridge, R., Ramani, P., and Young, B. (eds) (2008). Threatened Amphibians of the World. Lynx Edicions, IUCN, and Conservation International, Barcelona, Spain; Gland, Switzerland; and Arlington, Virginia, USA.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:81
Specimens with Sequences:99
Specimens with Barcodes:59
Species:10
Species With Barcodes:10
Public Records:2
Public Species:2
Public BINs:2
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Barcode data

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Conservation

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

It breeds by direct development (Guibé and Lamotte 1958).

  • Angel, F. (1950). ''Arthroleptis crusculum et A. nimbaense. Batraciens nouveaux de Guinée française. (Matériaux de la Mission Lamotte aux Monts Nimba).'' Bulletin du Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, 22(5), 559-562.
  • Guibé, J. and Lamotte, M. (1958). ''Morphologie et reproduction par developpement direct d'un anoure du Mont Nimba, Arthroleptis crusculum Angel.'' Bulletin du Muséum National d’histoire Naturelle, Série 2, 20, 125-133.
  • Stuart, S., Hoffmann, M., Chanson, J., Cox, N., Berridge, R., Ramani, P., and Young, B. (eds) (2008). Threatened Amphibians of the World. Lynx Edicions, IUCN, and Conservation International, Barcelona, Spain; Gland, Switzerland; and Arlington, Virginia, USA.
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Threats

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Arthroleptis crusculum was formerly an abundant and common species; habitat loss and degradation are likely contributing to population diminishment, although there have been no recent surveys of this species. Both "slash-and-burn agricultural activities" and "extensive iron-ore mining operations" are threatening habitat on Mt. Nimba. It occurs in at least one protected area, the Mount Nimba Strict Nature Reserve, which is a World Heritage Site (Stuart et al. 2008).

  • Angel, F. (1950). ''Arthroleptis crusculum et A. nimbaense. Batraciens nouveaux de Guinée française. (Matériaux de la Mission Lamotte aux Monts Nimba).'' Bulletin du Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, 22(5), 559-562.
  • Guibé, J. and Lamotte, M. (1958). ''Morphologie et reproduction par developpement direct d'un anoure du Mont Nimba, Arthroleptis crusculum Angel.'' Bulletin du Muséum National d’histoire Naturelle, Série 2, 20, 125-133.
  • Stuart, S., Hoffmann, M., Chanson, J., Cox, N., Berridge, R., Ramani, P., and Young, B. (eds) (2008). Threatened Amphibians of the World. Lynx Edicions, IUCN, and Conservation International, Barcelona, Spain; Gland, Switzerland; and Arlington, Virginia, USA.
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Wikipedia

Arthroleptis

Arthroleptis is a genus of frogs in the family Arthroleptidae found in tropical Africa. Their common name is screeching frogs, sometimes simply squeakers.[1]

Species[edit]

There are 47 species:[1]

Common nameBinomial name
Foulassi screeching frogArthroleptis adelphus Perret, 1966
Rugegewald screeching frogArthroleptis adolfifriederici Nieden, 1911
Ahl's squeakerArthroleptis affinis Ahl, 1939
Arthroleptis anotis Loader, Poynton, Lawson, Blackburn, and Menegon, 2011
Freetown long-fingered frogArthroleptis aureoli (Schiøtz, 1964)
Arthroleptis bioko Blackburn, 2010
Tumbo-Insel screeching frogArthroleptis bivittatus Müller, 1885
Togo screeching frogArthroleptis brevipes Ahl, 1924
Carqueja's squeakerArthroleptis carquejai Ferreira, 1906
Guinea screeching frogArthroleptis crusculum Angel, 1950
Laurent's screeching frogArthroleptis discodactylus (Laurent, 1954)
Arthroleptis fichika Blackburn, 2009
Arthroleptis formosus Rödel, Kouamé, Doumbia, and Sandberger, 2011
Ruo River screeching frogArthroleptis francei Loveridge, 1953
Itombwe screeching frogArthroleptis hematogaster (Laurent, 1954)
Arthroleptis kidogo Blackburn, 2009
Arthroleptis krokosua Ernst, Agyei, and Rödel, 2008
Arthroleptis kutogundua Blackburn, 2012
Lameer's squeakerArthroleptis lameerei De Witte, 1921
Lonnberg's squeakerArthroleptis langeri Rödel, Doumbia, Johnson, and Hillers, 2009
Loveridge's screeching frogArthroleptis loveridgei De Witte, 1933
Mosso screeching frogArthroleptis mossoensis (Laurent, 1954)
Arthroleptis nguruensis Poynton, Menegon, and Loader, 2009
Nike's squeakerArthroleptis nikeae Poynton, 2003
Mount Nimba screeching frogArthroleptis nimbaensis Angel, 1950
Arthroleptis nlonakoensis (Plath, Herrmann, and Böhme, 2006)
Arthroleptis palava Blackburn, Gvoždík, and Leaché, 2010
Arthroleptis perreti Blackburn, Gonwouo, Ernst, and Rödel, 2009
Lomami screeching frogArthroleptis phrynoides (Laurent, 1976)
Mottled squeakerArthroleptis poecilonotus Peters, 1863
Kivu screeching frogArthroleptis pyrrhoscelis Laurent, 1952
Reiche's squeakerArthroleptis reichei Nieden, 1911
Schubotz's squeakerArthroleptis schubotzi Nieden, 1911
Tanganyika screeching frogArthroleptis spinalis Boulenger, 1919
Common squeakerArthroleptis stenodactylus Pfeffer, 1893
Kambai squeakerArthroleptis stridens (Pickersgill, 2007)
Forest screeching frogArthroleptis sylvaticus (Laurent, 1954)
Striped screeching frogArthroleptis taeniatus Boulenger, 1906
Tanzania screeching frogArthroleptis tanneri Grandison, 1983
Cave squeakerArthroleptis troglodytes Poynton, 1963
Rainforest screeching frogArthroleptis tuberosus Andersson, 1905
Buea screeching frogArthroleptis variabilis Matschie, 1893
Mwana screeching frogArthroleptis vercammeni (Laurent, 1954)
Wahlberg's Humus FrogArthroleptis wahlbergii Smith, 1849
Plain squeakerArthroleptis xenochirus Boulenger, 1905
Dwarf squeakerArthroleptis xenodactyloides Hewitt, 1933
Eastern squeakerArthroleptis xenodactylus Boulenger, 1909
Zimmer's screeching frogArthroleptis zimmeri (Ahl, 1925)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Frost, Darrel R. (2014). "Arthroleptis Smith, 1849". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 21 August 2014. 
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