Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:20Public Records:14
Specimens with Sequences:16Public Species:8
Specimens with Barcodes:16Public BINs:0
Species:9         
Species With Barcodes:8         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Anigozanthos

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Wikipedia

Anigozanthos

Anigozanthos is a small genus of Australian plants in the Bloodwort family Haemodoraceae. The 11 species and several subspecies are commonly known as kangaroo paw and catspaw depending on the shape of their flowers. A further species, previously identified as Anigozanthos fuliginosus and commonly known as the black kangaroo paw, has been transferred to its own monotypic genus and is now known as Macropidia fuliginosa.

The genus was first named by Jacques Labillardière in his work, Relation du Voyage à la Recherche de la Pérouse, issued in 1800.[1] The French botanist collected and described the type species, Anigozanthus rufus, during the d'Entrecasteaux expedition's visit to Southwest Australia in 1792.[2] In recent years a number of numerous hybrids and cultivars have been developed. Kangaroo paws are much in demand as house plants and as cut flowers.

Contents

Description

Tall Kangaroo Paw (Anigozanthos flavidus).

These perennials are endemic to dry sandy, siliceous areas of southwest Australia, but they occur as well in a variety of other environments and soil types. They are grown commercially in Australia, the United States, Japan and Israel.

The plant grows from short, underground, horizontal rhizomes. The length and the character of these may vary between the species: some are fleshy, others are fragile. The sap in the root system allows the plants to survive extreme dry spells. In summer, a number of species die back to the rhizome, growing back in autumn.

The plants have a basal rosette of long green to greyish-green leaves. The leaves of some species are hairy. From the heart of this roset merge long leafless stalks, which can reach 2 m, ending in a raceme of flowers. The size and height of these stalks, which can be clothed in coloured hairs, varies between the species.

The tuberous flower buds are also covered with coloured hairs, giving it a velvety aspect. These long furry hairs also determine the colour of the flower, which may range from almost black to yellow, orange and red. Some species are even dichromatic (as Anigozanthos manglesii). The tubular form of the flower bud resembles a kangaroo paw, hence its name. The flower tip spreads fanlike into six petals. Full-grown plants can have up to ten flowers at the end of each stalk.

Diversity

The diversity of the genus is classified by 11 species, several of their subspecies are recognised by FloraBase as rare or endangered taxa.[3]

Commercial hybrids

The popularity of Anigozanthos, as a garden plant or commercially produced cut-flower, has led to the development of cultivars. The Australian Cultivar Registration Authority lists twenty seven registered names and descriptions of cultivars derived from the genus.[4] A larger number of patents for these, accepted or granted 'varieties', are recorded in the Plant breeders' rights database. [5]

Gallery

Source

  • Hopper, S (1993): "Kangaroo Paws and Catspaws - A Natural History and Field Guide", Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.
  • Australian Native Plants Society

References

  1. ^ "Anigozanthos Labill.". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government. 
  2. ^ Barker, Robyn (June 2003). "Labillardière, French naturalist extraordinaire". Australian Systematic Botany Society Newsletter (ASBS). p. 19. Retrieved 2009-02-13. [dead link]
  3. ^ "Anigozanthos". FloraBase. Department of Environment and Conservation, Government of Western Australia. 
  4. ^ "List of Registered Cultivars derived from Australian native flora". Australian Cultivar Registration Authority. 2004. Archived from the original on 19 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-18. 
  5. ^ "Anigozanthos". Plant Breeder's Rights. IP Australia. Retrieved 2009-05-18. 
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