Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Chinese (Simplified) (4) (learn more)

Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Found in seaward slopes and reef flats (Ref. 90102). Usually associated with outer reefs but will enter shallow water in protected areas. Often in large schools (Ref. 9710). Grazes on benthic algae (Ref. 3488). Also caught with nets and other types of artisanal gear (Ref. 2689). Minimum depth of 1 m reported from Ref. 30874.
  • Randall, J.E. and J.H. Choat 1980 Two new parrotfishes of the genus Scarus from the Central and South Pacific, with further examples of sexual dichromatism. Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 70:383-419. (Ref. 2689)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

Scarus prasiognathos is distributed eastwards from the Maldive Islands through Indonesia to New Ireland in Papua New Guinea, and north to the Ryukyu Islands, including Palau and Micronesia. This species is possibly replaced by Scarus falcipinnis in the western Indian Ocean (Randall and Chout 1980). Other Indian Ocean localities include Cocos-Keeling Islands, Christmas Island and western Australia (G.R. Allen pers. comm. 2009).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Indo-West Pacific: Maldives to New Ireland in Papua New Guinea, including Cocos-Keeling Islands, north to Ryukyu Islands and south to the Philippines, including Palau. This species is the terminal male of Scarus singaporensis. Possibly replaced by Scarus falcipinnis in the western Indian Ocean (Ref. 2689).
  • Myers, R.F. 1991 Micronesian reef fishes. Second Ed. Coral Graphics, Barrigada, Guam. 298 p. (Ref. 1602)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Indo-West Pacific.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© FishWise Professional

Source: FishWise Professional

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 9
  • Randall, J.E. and J.H. Choat 1980 Two new parrotfishes of the genus Scarus from the Central and South Pacific, with further examples of sexual dichromatism. Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 70:383-419. (Ref. 2689)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Maximum size: 700 mm NG
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© FishWise Professional

Source: FishWise Professional

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Max. size

70.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 9710))
  • Lieske, E. and R. Myers 1994 Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific & Caribbean including the Red Sea. Haper Collins Publishers, 400 p. (Ref. 9710)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Scales large. Median predorsal scales 6; 3 scale rows on cheek, with 1-3 scales in ventral row. Caudal fins emarginate in initial phase to deeply concave in large terminal phase. Lips nearly covering dental plates; terminal males with 0-2 canines posteriorly on side of upper plate, none on lower. The initial phase closely resembles that of S. altipinnis (Ref. 1602). The terminal phase has the distinctive brilliant green throat and lacks the filamentous middle dorsal spine (Ref. 1602).
  • Randall, J.E. and J.H. Choat 1980 Two new parrotfishes of the genus Scarus from the Central and South Pacific, with further examples of sexual dichromatism. Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 70:383-419. (Ref. 2689)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Scarus prasiognathos is associated with the outer slope of coral reefs but will enter shallow water in protected areas such as lagoons. This species is often found in large schools, and grazes on benthic algae. It is commonly found at a depth range of 1 - 15 m.

Systems
  • Marine
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Environment

reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 25 m (Ref. 90102)
  • Allen, G.R. and M.V. Erdmann 2012 Reef fishes of the East Indies. Perth, Australia: Universitiy of Hawai'i Press, Volumes I-III. Tropical Reef Research. (Ref. 90102)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth range based on 6 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 4 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1.83 - 9
  Temperature range (°C): 28.529 - 29.003
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.068 - 0.381
  Salinity (PPS): 34.113 - 34.500
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.522 - 4.549
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.108 - 0.179
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.526 - 3.291

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 1.83 - 9

Temperature range (°C): 28.529 - 29.003

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.068 - 0.381

Salinity (PPS): 34.113 - 34.500

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.522 - 4.549

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.108 - 0.179

Silicate (umol/l): 1.526 - 3.291
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth: 1 - 15m.
From 1 to 15 meters.

Habitat: reef-associated. Usually associated with outer reefs but will enter shallow water in protected areas. Often in large schools (Ref. 9710). Grazes on benthic algae (Ref. 3488). Also caught with nets and other types of artisanal gear.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© FishWise Professional

Source: FishWise Professional

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Occurs inshore (Ref. 75154).
  • Sano, M., M. Shimizu and Y. Nose 1984 Food habits of teleostean reef fishes in Okinawa Island, southern Japan. University of Tokyo Bulletin, no. 25. v,128p. University of Tokyo Press, Tokyo, Japan. 128 p. (Ref. 6110)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Partner Web Site: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Scarus prasiognathos

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Allen, G.

Reviewer/s
Collen, B., Richman, N., Beresford, A., Chenery, A. & Ram, M.

Contributor/s
De Silva, R., Milligan, HT, Lutz, M.L., Batchelor, A., Jopling, B., Kemp, K., Lewis, S., Lintott, P., Sears, J., Wilson, P., Smith, J., Livingston, F. & Raynal, M.

Justification
Scarus prasiognathos has been assessed as Least Concern. This is a widespread and relatively common species. This species is harvested by artisinal fisheries as a food source throughout most of its range, but it is thought not to represent a major threat. Due to the size of this species, it is likely to be taken in other fisheries, as by-catch. Monitoring of the extent of these threats is therefore needed.

History
  • 2010
    Least Concern
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
Scarus prasiognathos is relatively common in shallow regions of seaward and leeward reefs (FAO 2001b). It often occurs in schools containing more than 100 individuals (G.R. Allen pers. comm. 2009).

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
Scarus prasiognathos is harvested throughout most of its range, as a food source. It is harvested using artisinal fishing gear such as nets and traps. This is not thought to be a major threat. Due to the size of this species, it is likely to be taken in other fisheries, as by-catch.

Due to this species association with coral reef habitats it is likely to be undergoing declines due to threats on its habitat including destructive fishing practices, coral bleaching, Crown of Thorns starfish invasions, coastal development, pollution, and tourism. However these are localised threats and not considered a major threat to this wide-ranging species.

Parrotfishes show varying degrees of habitat preference and utilization of coral reef habitats, with some species spending the majority of their life stages on coral reefs, while others primarily utilize seagrass beds, mangroves, algal beds, and /or rocky reefs. Although the majority of the parrotfishes occur in mixed habitat (primarily inhabiting seagrass beds, mangroves, and rocky reefs) approximately 78% of these mixed habitat species are experiencing greater than 30% loss of coral reef area and habitat quality across their distributions. Of those species that occur exclusively in coral reef habitat, more than 80% are experiencing a greater than 30% of coral reef loss and degradation across their distributions. However, more research is needed to understand the long-term effects of habitat loss and degradation on these species populations. Widespread coral reef loss and declining habitat conditions are particularly worrying for species that depend on live coral reefs for food and shelter especially as studies have shown that protection of pristine habitats facilitate the persistence of adult populations in species that have spatially separated adult and juvenile habitats. Furthermore, coral reef loss and declining habitat conditions are particularly worrying for some corallivorous excavating parrotfishes that play major roles in reef dynamics and sedimentation (Comeros-Raynal et al. 2012).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Least Concern (LC)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for Scarus prasiognathos, however its distribution coincides with a number of marine protected areas.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial; aquarium: commercial
  • Burgess, W.E., H.R. Axelrod and R.E. Hunziker III 1990 Dr. Burgess's atlas of marine aquarium fishes. T.F.H. Publications, Inc., Neptune City, New Jersey. 768 p.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!