Overview

Comprehensive Description

Cette espèce fait l'objet d'un projet de sciences participatives en relation avec l'INPN et mené en partenariat avec Noé Conservation (www.biodiversite-foret.fr).
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© Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle. Service du Patrimoine naturel

Source: Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Rutpela maculata feeds within damp, rotting wood of Broadleaved trees

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Rutpela maculata feeds within damp, rotting wood of Betula
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Rutpela maculata feeds within damp, rotting wood of Pinus
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / visitor
imago of Rutpela maculata visits for nectar and/or pollen flower of Magnoliopsida
Remarks: season: 5-9

Foodplant / visitor
imago of Rutpela maculata visits for nectar and/or pollen flower of Apiaceae
Remarks: season: 5-9
Other: major host/prey

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rutpela maculata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Rutpela maculata

Rutpela maculata, the Spotted Longhorn, is a beetle species of flower longhorns belonging to the family Cerambycidae, subfamily Lepturinae.

Rutpela maculata – mating pair

This beetle is widespread in most of Europe, in East Palearctic ecozone and in the Near East.

Larvae are polyphagous in deciduous trees, mainly feeding on Picea abies, Corylus avellana, Fagus sylvatica, Castanea sativa and Ostrya carpinifolia, as well as on Quercus, Carpinus, Salix, Alnus, Populus and Betula species.

The adults grow up to 13–20 millimetres (0.51–0.79 in) and can be encountered from May through August, completing their life cycle in two-three years. Adults only live two-four weeks.

The head and pronotum are dark-brown, while elytra are yellowish, with black dots and stripes, rough imitations of wasps, which probably gives them some protection from birds.

The adults are very common flower-visitors, especially Apiaceae species, feeding on pollen and the nectar.

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