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Overview

Brief Summary

If you are on the tidal flats on a quiet day, you can hear the corophium wallowing in the mud. They make a remarkable dry crackling sound. Corophium are very common inhabitants of the muddy flats. In the summer, their population can reach densities greater than 10,000 per square meter. They dig tunnels, from which they gather food with their long tentacles, consuming as much as 4000 diatoms per day. This amount of diatoms must be processed and therefore corophium eject wastes up to 1000 times a day.
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Comprehensive Description

Description

 Corophium volutator has a long slender body that is whitish with brown markings and grows up to 11 mm in length. It has a clearly segmented, dorso-ventrally flattened body. The head is small with two pairs of forward pointing antennae; the second pair are a distinguishing feature of Corophium volutator and are particularly long and thick. There are seven pairs of segmented legs with the top segment of each being typically small and separate from that of the next segment.The morphology of the male and female antennae differs significantly and for identification refer to the appropriate key, e.g. Lincoln (1979).
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Distribution

Bay of Fundy south to Casco Bay; southern Norway to the Bay of Biscay and the Adriatic
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

infralittoral of the Gulf and estuary
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Depth range based on 1528 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 20 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -56 - 89
  Temperature range (°C): 6.832 - 18.747
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.267 - 6.514
  Salinity (PPS): 6.151 - 38.605
  Oxygen (ml/l): 5.298 - 8.227
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.073 - 0.535
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.450 - 12.933

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -56 - 89

Temperature range (°C): 6.832 - 18.747

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.267 - 6.514

Salinity (PPS): 6.151 - 38.605

Oxygen (ml/l): 5.298 - 8.227

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.073 - 0.535

Silicate (umol/l): 1.450 - 12.933
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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 The amphipod occupies semi-permanent U-shaped burrows in the fine sediments of mud flats, salt marsh pools and brackish ditches. It tolerates a wide range of salinities from nearly fully saline to almost fresh water. When present in high densities the openings of the burrows are clearly visible on the surface of the sediment.
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Associations

Known predators

  • Hall SJ, Raffaelli D (1991) Food-web patterns: lessons from a species-rich web. J Anim Ecol 60:823–842
  • Huxham M, Beany S, Raffaelli D (1996) Do parasites reduce the chances of triangulation in a real food web? Oikos 76:284–300
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Known prey organisms

Corophium volutator (Corophium volutator small crustacean) preys on:
POM

Based on studies in:
Scotland (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Hall SJ, Raffaelli D (1991) Food-web patterns: lessons from a species-rich web. J Anim Ecol 60:823–842
  • Huxham M, Beany S, Raffaelli D (1996) Do parasites reduce the chances of triangulation in a real food web? Oikos 76:284–300
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Corophium volutator

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Corophium volutator

Corophium volutator is a species of amphipod crustacean in the family Corophiidae.[2] It is found in mudflats of the northern Atlantic Ocean.[3]

Description

Corophium volutator is a slender animal, up to 11 millimetres (0.43 in) long, "whitish with brown markings".[4] The head bear two pairs of antennae, the first of which are small and point forwards, while the distinctive second pair are much longer and thicker.[4]

Life cycle

There are 1–2 generations per year,[5] and the females brood the eggs inside their brood pouch or marsupium.[6] They can occur in huge quantities: up to 60,000 per square metre have been observed.[6]

References

  1. ^ Mark Costello & Denise Bellan-Santini (2011). "Corophium volutator (Pallas, 1766)". In J. Lowry. World Amphipoda database. World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved April 12, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b M. J. de Kluijver & S. S. Ingalsuo (1999). Macrobenthos of the North Sea. 
  3. ^ Veronika Gerdol & R. G. Hughes (1994). "Feeding behaviour and diet of Corophium volutator in an estuary in southeastern England" (PDF). Marine Ecology Progress Series 114: 103–108. 
  4. ^ a b Ken Neal & Penny Avant (2006). "Corophium volutator, a mud shrimp". Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key Information Sub-programme. Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. Retrieved April 12, 2012. 
  5. ^ W. Herbert Wilson, Jr. & Kristian Parker (1996). "The life history of the amphipod, Corophium volutator: the effects of temperature and shorebird predation". Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 196 (1–2): 239–250. doi:10.1016/0022-0981(95)00133-6. 
  6. ^ a b J. A. Percy (1999). "Master of the Mudflats". Bay of Fundy Ecosystem Partnership. 
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