Ecology

Habitat

Occurs worldwide in temperate, and cool-temperate seas, usually on rocky boulder slopes and reef habitats.  Some species known to exist in tropical habitats.

  • Anker, Arthur, Juan Antonio Baeza, and Sammy De Grave. "A new species of Lysmata (Crustacea, Decapoda, Hippolytidae) from the Pacific Coast of Panama, with observations of its reproductive biology." Zoological Studies 48.5 (2009): 682-692.
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underneath rocks or in cracks and crevices. Shallow subtidal and intertidal. In association or not with morray eels.

  • Baeza JA. 2009. Protandric Simultaneous Hermaphroditism
  • Is a Conserved Trait in Lysmata (Caridea: Lysmatidae): Implications for the Evolution
  • Smithsonian Contributions to Marine Science 38. In Press.
  • of Hermaphroditism in the Genus.
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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Mutualism

Provides cleaning to remove parasites and dead skin off of various fish species.  

Spend more time cleaning the ventral rather than the dorsal surface of the fish because they are reluctant to board the fish. 

Mutualistic behavior more associated with gregarious, wandering, and omnivorous.  Therefor, not highly dependent on its host for survival and not known to display themselves to attract host.

Extremely agile movement when disturbed.  Seeks out nearest cover for protection, usually in a rock crevice.

  • Jonasson, Mark. "Fish Cleaning Behaviour of Shrimp." Journal of Zoology. 1st ed. Vol. 213. Redlands, 2009. 117-131. Print.
  • Wicksten, M. (2009). Interactions with fishes of five species of Lysmata (Decapoda, Caridea, Lysmatidae). Crustaceana, 1213-1223.
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Gregarious behavior. Living in large groups in crevices or cracks when in association or not with morray eels. Non specialized cleaner.

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Reproduction

Protandric Simultaneous Hermaphroditism

Based on size frequency distributions, it is evident that individuals initially develope as males and then change to femals in a single molt.

Female Phase individuals are able to copulate as males with other prespawning Female Phase individuals following their molting event.

Restricted capability of encountering partners to mate with by shrimps because of their association with their hosts would have favored PSH.

  • Baeza, J. A. "Protandric Simultaneous Hermaphroditism Is a Conserved Trait in Lysmata (Caridea: Lysmatidae): Implications for the Evolution of Hermaphroditism in the Genus." SMITHSONIAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE MARINE SCIENCES (2009): 95-110. Web. 7 Mar. 2015. .
  • Bauer, Raymond T., and William A. Newman. "Protandric Simultaneous Hermaphroditism In The Marine Shrimp Lysmata Californica (Caridea: Hippolytidae)." Journal of Crustacean Biology 24.1 (2004): 131-39. Web.
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Physiology and Cell Biology

Physiology

Absence of a bivalve carapace and omission of a seventh abdominal somite.

  • McLaughlin, Patsy A. "Class Malacostraca." Comparative Morphology of Recent Crustacea. San Francisco: W.H. Freeman, 1980. 59-70. Print.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcoding with mitochondrial 16s RNA DNA. Genebank number EU861498
  • Baeza,J.A., Schubart,C.D., Zillner,P., Fuentes,S. and Bauer,R.T.2009. Molecular phylogeny of shrimps from the genus Lysmata (Caridea: Hippolytidae): the evolutionary origins of protandric simultaneous hermaphroditism and social monogamy. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. Lond. 96, 415-424.
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