Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology/Natural History: This species captures its prey between its legs before feeding on it. It is a protandrous hermaphrodite (male first, then female later in life). It probably is a male its first year, becomes female the second year and lays eggs, then dies. Eggs are seen from late November to April. Predators include sand sole.

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Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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As with other shrimp in Family Pandalidae, this shrimp has no exopodites on the pereopods, pereopod 1 is not subchelate, and the carpus of pereopod 2 is multiarticulated (divided up into many subunits--7 or more). The rostrum is prominent, with movable dorsal spines. Pandalus goniurus has first antennae about as long as the carapace (the long antennae above are the second antennae). Abdominal segment 3 is laterally compressed and has a median lobe or spine (photo). Abdominal segment 4 does not have a mid-dorsal sharp spine on the posterior margin (photo) but does have a small ventral spine on the pleuron. The fifth abdominal segment has a well-developed posterolateral spine. The telson has a blunt tip and 5-7 dorsolateral spines (photo). The uropods are longer than the telson. The distal half of the lamella of the antennal scale is at least as wide as the spine (photo), but the spine is slightly longer than the lamella. The distal half of the rostrum angles upward, does not have dorsal spines (photo) and is bifid (has two points). The shrimp's overall color is translucent white with fine red stripes and small red dots. The fine red stripes on the abdomen angle upward toward the rear. The outer margin of the antennal scale is red. The telson and uropods have yellow spots near their bases (photo). The eyes are fairly large. The left pereopod 2 is longer and thinner than the right pereopod 2 and has more annulations on the multiarticulated carpus (51-54 vs 18-20). Males total length to about 6.2 cm, females to 7.8 mm.
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Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Geographical Range: Off Japan, Siberia, Alaska (Bering Sea), British Columbia, down to Puget Sound.

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Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Physical Description

Type Information

Type for Pandalus dapifer Murdoch, 1884
Catalog Number: USNM 7881
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology
Preparation: Alcohol (Ethanol)
Year Collected: 1883
Locality: 10 Mile W Of Point Franklin, Alaska, United States, North Pacific Ocean
Microhabitat: Sand
Depth (m): 24.7 to 24.7
  • Type:
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Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Look Alikes

How to Distinguish from Similar Species: The laterally compressed, "humpy" third abdominal segment with the median dorsal lobe, as well as the distinctive abdominal striping help distinguish this species from other Pandalids. Pandalus danae has diagonal abdominal stripes but they are coarser and angle downward toward the back. Pandalus stenolepus has a humped back and abdominal stripes which angle upwards toward the back like this species does, but it also has large, dark red spots and blue dots.
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Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 349 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 29 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 215.5
  Temperature range (°C): -1.287 - 8.705
  Nitrate (umol/L): 2.500 - 32.080
  Salinity (PPS): 31.662 - 33.989
  Oxygen (ml/l): 2.565 - 8.585
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.830 - 2.594
  Silicate (umol/l): 12.508 - 47.106

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 1 - 215.5

Temperature range (°C): -1.287 - 8.705

Nitrate (umol/L): 2.500 - 32.080

Salinity (PPS): 31.662 - 33.989

Oxygen (ml/l): 2.565 - 8.585

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.830 - 2.594

Silicate (umol/l): 12.508 - 47.106
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Depth Range: Subtidal to 450 m

Habitat: Sandy and muddy bottoms

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Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Pandalus goniurus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There is 1 barcode sequence available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is the sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen.

Other sequences that do not yet meet barcode criteria may also be available.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNCTTCTTTGAGACTTTTAATTCGAGCTGAACTTGGTCAACCAGGTAGGTTGGTCGGAAACGATCAAATCTATAATGTTGTAGTCACAGCTCATGCTTTTGTTATAATTTTTTTTATGGTAATACCAATTATAATTGGTGGTTTTGGAAACTGGCTTGTGCCACTAATATTAGGTGCCCCTGACATAGCTTTTCCACGAATAAATAATATAAGATTTTGGCTCTTACCCCCCTCTCTCACACTTCTTCTCTCTAGTGGAATAGTGGAAAGCGGCGTGGGTACCGGTTGAACAGTCTACCCACCGTTGTCGGCAGGGATTGCTCACGCCGGGGCTTCAGTGGATCTTGGAATTTTTTCTCTCCACTTAGCCGGAGTGTCTTCTATTTTAGGAGCCGTTAATTTTATAACTACAGTTATTAATATACGAAGAAGAGGAATATCTATGGACCGAATACCCCTCTTTGTGTGATCTGTTTTTTTAACTGCTCTTCTACTACTCCTATCACTACCAGTTCTTGCGGGAGCAATTACAATGTTATTAACAGACCGAAACCTAAATACCTCGTTCTTTGATCCTGCAGGGGGTGGGGACCCTATTTTATATCAACACTTATTT
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pandalus goniurus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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