Overview

Comprehensive Description

Sicyonia brevirostris is the largest of the rock shrimp occurring in the vicinity of the IRL, with mature individuals measuring more than 10 cm (4 inches) carapace length (CL).It is differentiated from other penaeoid
  • Anderson, W. W. 1956. Observations upon the biology, ecology and life history of the common shrimp, Penaeus setiferus (Linnaeus) along the SouthAtlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Proceedings of the Indo- Pacific Fisheries Council 6:399-403.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1966. The shrimp and the shrimp fishery of the southern United States. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fishery Leaflet No. 589, 8 p.
  • Cobb, S.P., C.P. Futch and D.K. Camp. 1973. Memoirs of the HourglassCruises: the rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, 1871 (Decapoda, Penaeidae). Fla. Dept. Nat. Resour. Mar. Res. Lab. Vol III, Pt. 1, 38 pp.
  • Cook, H.L. and M.A. Murphy. 1965. Early developmental stages of the rockshrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, reared in the laboratory. TulaneStud. Zool. 12(4): 109-127.
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1980. FAO species catalogue. Vol.1. Shrimps and prawns of theworld. An annotated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries. FAO Fish.Synop., (125)Vol.1:261 p.
  • Keiser, R.K. 1976. Distribution of rock shrimp (Sicyonia brevirostris) incoastal waters of the southeastern United States. South Carolina MarineResources and Research Institute. 19pp.
  • Kennedy, F.S., J.J. Crane, R.A. Schlieder, and D.G. Barber. 1977. Studies ofthe rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris, a new fishery resource on Florida'sAtlantic shelf. Florida Marine Research Publications #27. Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.
  • Ruppert, E. E. and R. Fox. 1988. Seashore animals of the Southeast: a guide tocommon shallow water invertebrates of the southeastern Atlantic Coast.University of South Carolina Press. Columbia, SC.
  • South Atlantic Fishery Management Council . 1996. Amendment 1 to theFishery Management Plan for the shrimp fishery of the South Atlantic Region(rock shrimp) including an environmental assessment, initial regulatory,flexibility analysis, regulatory impact review, and social impact assessment.South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Charleston, SC.
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Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Distribution

Off Norfolk, Va. To Cuba
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Sicyonia brevirostris occurs in the Western Atlantic from approximately Norfolk, Virginia south along the Atlantic coast to Florida and the Gulf of Mexico to the Yucatán, including Cuba, and the Bahamas. Centers of abundance occur in the waters off North Carolina near Cape Lookout; Cape Canaveral in Florida, and the Yucatán. The brown rock shrimp is rare to occasional within the Indian River Lagoon, but it supports a large commercial fishery in nearshore and offshore waters from Jacksonville to St. Lucie Inlet where they inhabit waters 18 - 73 meters deep (Anderson 1956). Juveniles are occasionally found on the rocks of jetties, in tidal creeks, and on protected beaches (Ruppert and Fox 1988).
  • Anderson, W. W. 1956. Observations upon the biology, ecology and life history of the common shrimp, Penaeus setiferus (Linnaeus) along the SouthAtlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Proceedings of the Indo- Pacific Fisheries Council 6:399-403.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1966. The shrimp and the shrimp fishery of the southern United States. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fishery Leaflet No. 589, 8 p.
  • Cobb, S.P., C.P. Futch and D.K. Camp. 1973. Memoirs of the HourglassCruises: the rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, 1871 (Decapoda, Penaeidae). Fla. Dept. Nat. Resour. Mar. Res. Lab. Vol III, Pt. 1, 38 pp.
  • Cook, H.L. and M.A. Murphy. 1965. Early developmental stages of the rockshrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, reared in the laboratory. TulaneStud. Zool. 12(4): 109-127.
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1980. FAO species catalogue. Vol.1. Shrimps and prawns of theworld. An annotated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries. FAO Fish.Synop., (125)Vol.1:261 p.
  • Keiser, R.K. 1976. Distribution of rock shrimp (Sicyonia brevirostris) incoastal waters of the southeastern United States. South Carolina MarineResources and Research Institute. 19pp.
  • Kennedy, F.S., J.J. Crane, R.A. Schlieder, and D.G. Barber. 1977. Studies ofthe rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris, a new fishery resource on Florida'sAtlantic shelf. Florida Marine Research Publications #27. Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.
  • Ruppert, E. E. and R. Fox. 1988. Seashore animals of the Southeast: a guide tocommon shallow water invertebrates of the southeastern Atlantic Coast.University of South Carolina Press. Columbia, SC.
  • South Atlantic Fishery Management Council . 1996. Amendment 1 to theFishery Management Plan for the shrimp fishery of the South Atlantic Region(rock shrimp) including an environmental assessment, initial regulatory,flexibility analysis, regulatory impact review, and social impact assessment.South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Charleston, SC.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Physical Description

Size

Maximum total length is 15.3 cm (6.02 inches); however, most individuals found in shallow water areas are less than 5 cm (2 inches). Males reach approximately 11.6 cm (4.5 inches) while females reach 11.8 cm (4.6 inches).Typical grow rates are approximately 2-3 mm CL per month in juveniles, and 0.5 - 0.6 mm CL per month in adults. Females grow slightly faster than males, but males gain weight faster in proportion to CL in all class sizes (Kennedy et al. 1977). Growth is more rapid in summer months. Maximum life span is approximately 20 - 22 months (Kennedy et al. 1977).
  • Anderson, W. W. 1956. Observations upon the biology, ecology and life history of the common shrimp, Penaeus setiferus (Linnaeus) along the SouthAtlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Proceedings of the Indo- Pacific Fisheries Council 6:399-403.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1966. The shrimp and the shrimp fishery of the southern United States. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fishery Leaflet No. 589, 8 p.
  • Cobb, S.P., C.P. Futch and D.K. Camp. 1973. Memoirs of the HourglassCruises: the rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, 1871 (Decapoda, Penaeidae). Fla. Dept. Nat. Resour. Mar. Res. Lab. Vol III, Pt. 1, 38 pp.
  • Cook, H.L. and M.A. Murphy. 1965. Early developmental stages of the rockshrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, reared in the laboratory. TulaneStud. Zool. 12(4): 109-127.
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1980. FAO species catalogue. Vol.1. Shrimps and prawns of theworld. An annotated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries. FAO Fish.Synop., (125)Vol.1:261 p.
  • Keiser, R.K. 1976. Distribution of rock shrimp (Sicyonia brevirostris) incoastal waters of the southeastern United States. South Carolina MarineResources and Research Institute. 19pp.
  • Kennedy, F.S., J.J. Crane, R.A. Schlieder, and D.G. Barber. 1977. Studies ofthe rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris, a new fishery resource on Florida'sAtlantic shelf. Florida Marine Research Publications #27. Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.
  • Ruppert, E. E. and R. Fox. 1988. Seashore animals of the Southeast: a guide tocommon shallow water invertebrates of the southeastern Atlantic Coast.University of South Carolina Press. Columbia, SC.
  • South Atlantic Fishery Management Council . 1996. Amendment 1 to theFishery Management Plan for the shrimp fishery of the South Atlantic Region(rock shrimp) including an environmental assessment, initial regulatory,flexibility analysis, regulatory impact review, and social impact assessment.South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Charleston, SC.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 460 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 240 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 490
  Temperature range (°C): 4.074 - 26.348
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.289 - 22.483
  Salinity (PPS): 33.723 - 36.472
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.326 - 5.755
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.063 - 1.471
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.756 - 16.679

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 490

Temperature range (°C): 4.074 - 26.348

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.289 - 22.483

Salinity (PPS): 33.723 - 36.472

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.326 - 5.755

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.063 - 1.471

Silicate (umol/l): 0.756 - 16.679
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Trophic Strategy

The diet of Sicyonia brevirostris consists primarily of mollusks, crustaceans and polychaete worms. Also included are nematodes, and foraminiferans. Gut content analysis of brown rock shrimp found ostracods, amphipods and decapods made up the bulk of the diet, with lesser amounts of tanaidaceans, isopods, cumaceans, gastropods, and other bivalves also present (Kennedy et al. 1977). Habitats: Essential habitat for Sicyonia brevirostris is quartz and shell sand of fine to medium grain as occurs in nearshore and offshore Florida. Typical water depth ranges from 25 - 65m (82 - 213 ft.).Activity Time: Cobb et al. (1973) reported that brown rock shrimp are nocturnally active, likely burrowing into substrata during daylight hours.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1956. Observations upon the biology, ecology and life history of the common shrimp, Penaeus setiferus (Linnaeus) along the SouthAtlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Proceedings of the Indo- Pacific Fisheries Council 6:399-403.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1966. The shrimp and the shrimp fishery of the southern United States. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fishery Leaflet No. 589, 8 p.
  • Cobb, S.P., C.P. Futch and D.K. Camp. 1973. Memoirs of the HourglassCruises: the rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, 1871 (Decapoda, Penaeidae). Fla. Dept. Nat. Resour. Mar. Res. Lab. Vol III, Pt. 1, 38 pp.
  • Cook, H.L. and M.A. Murphy. 1965. Early developmental stages of the rockshrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, reared in the laboratory. TulaneStud. Zool. 12(4): 109-127.
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1980. FAO species catalogue. Vol.1. Shrimps and prawns of theworld. An annotated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries. FAO Fish.Synop., (125)Vol.1:261 p.
  • Keiser, R.K. 1976. Distribution of rock shrimp (Sicyonia brevirostris) incoastal waters of the southeastern United States. South Carolina MarineResources and Research Institute. 19pp.
  • Kennedy, F.S., J.J. Crane, R.A. Schlieder, and D.G. Barber. 1977. Studies ofthe rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris, a new fishery resource on Florida'sAtlantic shelf. Florida Marine Research Publications #27. Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.
  • Ruppert, E. E. and R. Fox. 1988. Seashore animals of the Southeast: a guide tocommon shallow water invertebrates of the southeastern Atlantic Coast.University of South Carolina Press. Columbia, SC.
  • South Atlantic Fishery Management Council . 1996. Amendment 1 to theFishery Management Plan for the shrimp fishery of the South Atlantic Region(rock shrimp) including an environmental assessment, initial regulatory,flexibility analysis, regulatory impact review, and social impact assessment.South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Charleston, SC.
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Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Population Biology

While not abundant within the Indian River Lagoon, brown rock shrimp populations can be large in nearshore and offshore waters. In a 3-region area of Florida which spanned from Amelia Island near Jacksonville, Florida south to St. Lucie Inlet, Florida, rock shrimp were found in all regions when water depth was between 18 - 73 m (60 - 240 feet) (Anderson 1956). Highest densities of Sicyonia brevirostris occurred between 34 - 55 m (110 - 180 feet), with density decreasing both inshore and offshore of this range. The deep water limit to rock shrimp occurrence is likely habitat related, as suitable bottom type decreases beyond 55m depths. The shallow water limit of rock shrimp occurrence is largely unknown, but the species is known to be scarce on muddy substrata. Shelf currents near Cape Canaveral tend to keep larvae and recruits on the Florida Shelf and may transport them inshore in springtime (Kennedy et al. 1977).
  • Anderson, W. W. 1956. Observations upon the biology, ecology and life history of the common shrimp, Penaeus setiferus (Linnaeus) along the SouthAtlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Proceedings of the Indo- Pacific Fisheries Council 6:399-403.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1966. The shrimp and the shrimp fishery of the southern United States. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fishery Leaflet No. 589, 8 p.
  • Cobb, S.P., C.P. Futch and D.K. Camp. 1973. Memoirs of the HourglassCruises: the rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, 1871 (Decapoda, Penaeidae). Fla. Dept. Nat. Resour. Mar. Res. Lab. Vol III, Pt. 1, 38 pp.
  • Cook, H.L. and M.A. Murphy. 1965. Early developmental stages of the rockshrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, reared in the laboratory. TulaneStud. Zool. 12(4): 109-127.
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1980. FAO species catalogue. Vol.1. Shrimps and prawns of theworld. An annotated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries. FAO Fish.Synop., (125)Vol.1:261 p.
  • Keiser, R.K. 1976. Distribution of rock shrimp (Sicyonia brevirostris) incoastal waters of the southeastern United States. South Carolina MarineResources and Research Institute. 19pp.
  • Kennedy, F.S., J.J. Crane, R.A. Schlieder, and D.G. Barber. 1977. Studies ofthe rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris, a new fishery resource on Florida'sAtlantic shelf. Florida Marine Research Publications #27. Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.
  • Ruppert, E. E. and R. Fox. 1988. Seashore animals of the Southeast: a guide tocommon shallow water invertebrates of the southeastern Atlantic Coast.University of South Carolina Press. Columbia, SC.
  • South Atlantic Fishery Management Council . 1996. Amendment 1 to theFishery Management Plan for the shrimp fishery of the South Atlantic Region(rock shrimp) including an environmental assessment, initial regulatory,flexibility analysis, regulatory impact review, and social impact assessment.South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Charleston, SC.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

Female maturation size ranges from 17 - 24 mm (0.6 - 0.9 inches) CL (carapace length) or larger (Kennedy et al. 1977). Males mature when they reach approximately 18 mm CL (0.65 inches). Rock shrimp have separate sexes, with copulation occurring between hard-shelled individuals. Fecundity, as in many shrimp species, is high, and increases with increased body size. Fertilization takes place as eggs and sperm are simultaneously expulsed from the female. Spawning occurs year-round, with females releasing eggs 2 -3 times during the year, but peaks between November and January (Kennedy et al, 1977). Larvae are present in the water column throughout they year. Kennedy et al. (1977) identified 5 ovarian stages in the brown rock shrimp, one more than was found in penaeid shrimp: 1)Undeveloped; 2) Developing; 3) Nearly Ripe; 4) Ripe; and 5) Advanced Ripe.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1956. Observations upon the biology, ecology and life history of the common shrimp, Penaeus setiferus (Linnaeus) along the SouthAtlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Proceedings of the Indo- Pacific Fisheries Council 6:399-403.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1966. The shrimp and the shrimp fishery of the southern United States. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fishery Leaflet No. 589, 8 p.
  • Cobb, S.P., C.P. Futch and D.K. Camp. 1973. Memoirs of the HourglassCruises: the rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, 1871 (Decapoda, Penaeidae). Fla. Dept. Nat. Resour. Mar. Res. Lab. Vol III, Pt. 1, 38 pp.
  • Cook, H.L. and M.A. Murphy. 1965. Early developmental stages of the rockshrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, reared in the laboratory. TulaneStud. Zool. 12(4): 109-127.
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1980. FAO species catalogue. Vol.1. Shrimps and prawns of theworld. An annotated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries. FAO Fish.Synop., (125)Vol.1:261 p.
  • Keiser, R.K. 1976. Distribution of rock shrimp (Sicyonia brevirostris) incoastal waters of the southeastern United States. South Carolina MarineResources and Research Institute. 19pp.
  • Kennedy, F.S., J.J. Crane, R.A. Schlieder, and D.G. Barber. 1977. Studies ofthe rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris, a new fishery resource on Florida'sAtlantic shelf. Florida Marine Research Publications #27. Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.
  • Ruppert, E. E. and R. Fox. 1988. Seashore animals of the Southeast: a guide tocommon shallow water invertebrates of the southeastern Atlantic Coast.University of South Carolina Press. Columbia, SC.
  • South Atlantic Fishery Management Council . 1996. Amendment 1 to theFishery Management Plan for the shrimp fishery of the South Atlantic Region(rock shrimp) including an environmental assessment, initial regulatory,flexibility analysis, regulatory impact review, and social impact assessment.South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Charleston, SC.
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Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Growth

Eggs hatch within 24 hours into nauplii larvae measuring approximately 0.3 mm (0.01 inches) total length. There are 3 protozoeal stages, 4 mysid stages, and 1 postlarval stage. Cook and Murphy (1965) raised larvae under laboratory and reported a development time of 29 days from the nauplius to the postlarva, and an additional 30 - 60 days to the juvenile stage. Recruitment of postlarvae to the area offshore of Cape Canaveral was found to occur to some degree in all months. Generally, most recruitment occurs between April and August, with the largest peaks observed between July and August (Kennedy et al. 1977).
  • Anderson, W. W. 1956. Observations upon the biology, ecology and life history of the common shrimp, Penaeus setiferus (Linnaeus) along the SouthAtlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Proceedings of the Indo- Pacific Fisheries Council 6:399-403.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1966. The shrimp and the shrimp fishery of the southern United States. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fishery Leaflet No. 589, 8 p.
  • Cobb, S.P., C.P. Futch and D.K. Camp. 1973. Memoirs of the HourglassCruises: the rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, 1871 (Decapoda, Penaeidae). Fla. Dept. Nat. Resour. Mar. Res. Lab. Vol III, Pt. 1, 38 pp.
  • Cook, H.L. and M.A. Murphy. 1965. Early developmental stages of the rockshrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, reared in the laboratory. TulaneStud. Zool. 12(4): 109-127.
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1980. FAO species catalogue. Vol.1. Shrimps and prawns of theworld. An annotated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries. FAO Fish.Synop., (125)Vol.1:261 p.
  • Keiser, R.K. 1976. Distribution of rock shrimp (Sicyonia brevirostris) incoastal waters of the southeastern United States. South Carolina MarineResources and Research Institute. 19pp.
  • Kennedy, F.S., J.J. Crane, R.A. Schlieder, and D.G. Barber. 1977. Studies ofthe rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris, a new fishery resource on Florida'sAtlantic shelf. Florida Marine Research Publications #27. Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.
  • Ruppert, E. E. and R. Fox. 1988. Seashore animals of the Southeast: a guide tocommon shallow water invertebrates of the southeastern Atlantic Coast.University of South Carolina Press. Columbia, SC.
  • South Atlantic Fishery Management Council . 1996. Amendment 1 to theFishery Management Plan for the shrimp fishery of the South Atlantic Region(rock shrimp) including an environmental assessment, initial regulatory,flexibility analysis, regulatory impact review, and social impact assessment.South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Charleston, SC.
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Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Sicyonia brevirostris

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Fisheries Importance: Before the 1970s, rock shrimp were primarily captured incidentally by trawlers seeking out commercially valuable penaeid shrimps. The fishery first emerged as viable with the first recorded rock shrimp landings in 1970. In that year, 1200 pounds of rock shrimp were harvested, with an estimated value of $642. In 1972, landings totaled 443,035 pounds and were valued at $258,528. By 1977, the fishery was being studied for sustainability, and substantial rock shrimp populations offshore of Jacksonville, Cape Canaveral and Ft. Pierce were identified.The statewide commercial catch of wild harvested hard clams, Sicyonia brevirostris, between the years 1987 - 2001 was 105.4 million pounds, with a dollar value of over $97.5 million. The 5 county area encompassing the IRL (Volusia, Brevard, Indian River, St. Lucie and Martin Counties) accounts for 60.3 million pounds of the total harvest, with a dollar value of $56 million. This ranks the rock shrimp first in pounds harvested, and second in commercial value, behind only the hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria.Figure 1 below shows the dollar value of the rock shrimp fishery to IRL counties by year. All size classes of shrimp were combined in this dataset. As shown, commercial catch ranged from a low of $445,900 in 1987 to a high of over $13.3 million in 1996. Brevard County annually accounts for the largest percentage of the catch with 90% in total (Figure 2), followed distantly by St. Lucie County, which accounts for approximately 10% of the catch, nearly all of which was harvested between 1994 - 1997. The commercial harvest in Volusia county accounts for 0.22% of the total harvest. No commercial rock shrimp catches were reported in either Martin or Indian River Counties over the time period examined.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1956. Observations upon the biology, ecology and life history of the common shrimp, Penaeus setiferus (Linnaeus) along the SouthAtlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Proceedings of the Indo- Pacific Fisheries Council 6:399-403.
  • Anderson, W. W. 1966. The shrimp and the shrimp fishery of the southern United States. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fishery Leaflet No. 589, 8 p.
  • Cobb, S.P., C.P. Futch and D.K. Camp. 1973. Memoirs of the HourglassCruises: the rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, 1871 (Decapoda, Penaeidae). Fla. Dept. Nat. Resour. Mar. Res. Lab. Vol III, Pt. 1, 38 pp.
  • Cook, H.L. and M.A. Murphy. 1965. Early developmental stages of the rockshrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris Stimpson, reared in the laboratory. TulaneStud. Zool. 12(4): 109-127.
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1980. FAO species catalogue. Vol.1. Shrimps and prawns of theworld. An annotated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries. FAO Fish.Synop., (125)Vol.1:261 p.
  • Keiser, R.K. 1976. Distribution of rock shrimp (Sicyonia brevirostris) incoastal waters of the southeastern United States. South Carolina MarineResources and Research Institute. 19pp.
  • Kennedy, F.S., J.J. Crane, R.A. Schlieder, and D.G. Barber. 1977. Studies ofthe rock shrimp, Sicyonia brevirostris, a new fishery resource on Florida'sAtlantic shelf. Florida Marine Research Publications #27. Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.
  • Ruppert, E. E. and R. Fox. 1988. Seashore animals of the Southeast: a guide tocommon shallow water invertebrates of the southeastern Atlantic Coast.University of South Carolina Press. Columbia, SC.
  • South Atlantic Fishery Management Council . 1996. Amendment 1 to theFishery Management Plan for the shrimp fishery of the South Atlantic Region(rock shrimp) including an environmental assessment, initial regulatory,flexibility analysis, regulatory impact review, and social impact assessment.South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Charleston, SC.
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Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Wikipedia

Sicyonia brevirostris

Sicyonia brevirostris, the brown rock shrimp, is a species of prawn. It is found along the coasts of the western Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico from Norfolk, Virginia to Yucatán, including Cuba and the Bahamas.[1]

Notes

  1. ^ K. Hill (May 10, 2005). "Sicyonia brevirostris (brown rock shrimp)". Smithsonian Institution. http://www.sms.si.edu/irlspec/sicyon_brevir.htm. Retrieved May 15, 2011.

Other references


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