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Amphimedon queenslandica

Amphimedon queenslandica is a marine demosponge from the Great Barrier Reef. It was first discovered in 1998 and was formally described in 2006. It is a hermaphroditic species whose eggs are fertilised internally by sperm spawned into the ocean. Amphimedon queenslandica has a larval and a benthic stage. This sponge was the first member of phylum Porifera to have its genome sequenced. Analysis of this genome has contributed to our understanding of the evolution of animal complexity.

  • Courtesy of Dr. Bernard Degnan, University of Queensland, School of Biological Sciences
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Amphimedon queenslandica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Amphimedon queenslandica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Amphimedon queenslandica

Amphimedon queenslandica stores embryos in its brood chamber.[2] The image is about 4 mm wide.

Amphimedon queenslandica (formerly known as Reniera sp.[2]) is a sponge native to the Great Barrier Reef. Its genome has been sequenced.[3] It has been the subject of various studies on the evolution of metazoan development.[2][4]

A. queenslandica was first discovered in 1998 on Heron Island Reef by Sally Leys during a survey of sponge species,[5] and was formally described by John Hooper and Rob van Soest in 2006.[1] Like most sponges, it has a biphasic life cycle, passing through a planktonic phase whilst a larva, but later becoming a benthic dweller.[5] It is hermaphroditic, and reproduces via spermcast spawning,[3] meaning it releases sperm into water but retains eggs, which are fertilised internally.[6] The embryos develop in brood chambers until they reach a certain size, then disperse as parenchymella larvae.[5] During this larval stage, they have a strong preference for darkness.[5] The sponge is difficult or impossible to maintain in captivity.[5]

Genetics[edit]

The genome of Amphimedon queenslandica was sequenced in 2009 to provide insights into the evolution of animal complexity and remains the only sponge to be sequenced.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hooper, John N.A.; Rob W.M. Van Soeast (2006-09-14). "A new species of Amphimedon (Porifera, Demospongiae, Haplosclerida, Niphatidae) from the Capricorn-Bunker Group of Islands, Great Barrier Reef, Australia: target species for the ‘sponge genome project’". Zootaxa (Magnolia Press) 1314: 31–29. Retrieved 2010-04-07. 
  2. ^ a b c Adamska, M.; Degnan, S.; Green, K.; Adamski, M.; Craigie, A.; Larroux, C.; Degnan, B.; Fraser, J. (2007). Fraser, James, ed. "Wnt and TGF-beta expression in the sponge Amphimedon queenslandica and the origin of metazoan embryonic patterning". PLoS ONE 2 (10): e1031. Bibcode:2007PLoSO...2.1031A. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0001031. PMC 2000352. PMID 17925879.  edit
  3. ^ a b c Srivastava, M.; Simakov, O.; Chapman, J.; Fahey, B.; Gauthier, M. E. A.; Mitros, T.; Richards, G. S.; Conaco, C.; Dacre, M.; Hellsten, U.; Larroux, C.; Putnam, N. H.; Stanke, M.; Adamska, M.; Darling, A.; Degnan, S. M.; Oakley, T. H.; Plachetzki, D. C.; Zhai, Y.; Adamski, M.; Calcino, A.; Cummins, S. F.; Goodstein, D. M.; Harris, C.; Jackson, D. J.; Leys, S. P.; Shu, S.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Vervoort, M.; Kosik, K. S. (2010). "The Amphimedon queenslandica genome and the evolution of animal complexity". Nature 466 (7307): 720–726. Bibcode:2010Natur.466..720S. doi:10.1038/nature09201. PMC 3130542. PMID 20686567.  edit
  4. ^ Tompkins-Macdonald, G. .; Gallin, W. .; Sakarya, O. .; Degnan, B. .; Leys, S. .; Boland, L. . (2009). "Expression of a poriferan potassium channel: insights into the evolution of ion channels in metazoans". The Journal of experimental biology 212 (Pt 6): 761–767. doi:10.1242/jeb.026971. PMID 19251990.  edit
  5. ^ a b c d e Degnan, B. M.; Adamska, M.; Craigie, A.; Degnan, S. M.; Fahey, B.; Gauthier, M.; Hooper, J. N. A.; Larroux, C.; Leys, S. P.; Lovas, E.; Richards, G. S. (2008). "The Demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica: Reconstructing the Ancestral Metazoan Genome and Deciphering the Origin of Animal Multicellularity". Cold Spring Harbor Protocols 2008 (13): pdb.emo108. doi:10.1101/pdb.emo108.  edit
  6. ^ Bishop, J. D. D.; Pemberton, A. J. (2006). "The third way: spermcast mating in sessile marine invertebrates". Integrative and Comparative Biology 46: 398. doi:10.1093/icb/icj037.  edit
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