Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

The ground pangolin is a solitary and nocturnal animal, although in winter it will often venture out in the late afternoon (6). It normally walks slowly with its head swaying from side to side and its tail dragging along the ground, although it is also capable of running and walking on two legs (5). When searching for food it frequently walks on its hindlegs, sniffing continually for prey with its nose close to the ground and its forelegs and tail touching the ground occasionally for balance (6). When an ant or termite nest is located, the ground pangolin uses its front claws to break open a hole into which it inserts its long tongue and feeds on the ants within. The tongue can extend an incredible 10 to 15 centimetres beyond the pangolin's lips, and is retracted into a pouch in the throat when not in use (5). It also digs shallow holes in the ground, carefully moving the soil as its tongue flicks in and out of the ant nest's passages (2). Any sand that is swallowed along with the ants helps to grind the soft food in the pangolin's muscular stomach (6). While capable of digging their own burrows, ground pangolins prefer to live in burrows dug by anteaters or spring hares where they sleep curled up (2) (5). While scales do not provide good insulation or protection from external parasites, they are an effective shield against scratches from sharp rocks in the walls of a burrow, or against a predator (5). The ground pangolin's mating season is thought to be from late summer to early autumn, with birthing in winter after a gestation period of around 139 days long. Females give birth to one young per year which they carry clinging to their back (5).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

The unusual ground pangolin belongs to a group of only seven armour-plated species, (the order Pholidota), a group that is distinguished from other mammals by their protective layer of horny scales (4). Its long, streamlined body; small, cone-shaped head, and thick tail are covered with overlapping yellow-brown scales, composed of fused hairs and shaped like artichoke leaves. The ground pangolin's underside and inner surfaces of the limbs are the only parts of the body not protected by scales, but when threatened, the pangolin can roll into an almost impregnable ball, wrapping its muscular tail around the body and leaving only sharp scales exposed to predators (5). The ground pangolin's strong forelegs bear long, robust claws, capable of digging in the ground and tearing apart ant and termite nests (5). A specialist in eating ants and termites, the toothless ground pangolin possesses many other adaptations for this diet including a long, conical tongue used to lap up prey; an acute sense of smell to locate its food (5), and thick eyelids to protect its eyes from ant bites (6)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

The Ground Pangolin according to MammalMAP

The ground pangolin (Manis temminckii), also known as Temmnick’s Pangolin or the Cape Pangolin, is one of four species of pangolin which can be found in Africa and the only one in southern and eastern Africa. The Pangolin measures over 1 m in length and weighs up to 18 Kg. The body is protected by armour of imbricated brown scales, which uniquely identifies this species amongst all mammals. Except for the forehead, there are no scales on the head or belly, or on the inner surfaces of the legs.

Since Pangolins are entirely insectivorous, an abundant availability of ants and termites to sustain subsistence, governs its occurrence. Another factor determining occurrence is the availability of burrows or other forms of shelter. They feed predominantly on formicid ants. Pangolins appear to be highly selective feeders in that only 19 species of ants and termites are taken.

It locates prey by smell, even under the soil surface. When prey is located, tunnels are opened up with the well-equipped front paws. The 250 mm long, rod-shaped tongue is covered with sticky saliva. This is used as a tool to collect prey by inserting it into the termite tunnels. When withdrawn it is covered with trapped prey which is gathered into the mouth.

In South Africa the ground pangolin ranges over most of the former eastern, northern and western Transvaal, northern KwaZulu-Natal, and north-eastern Cape, from where its distribution continues into neighbouring countries.

For more information on MammalMAP, visit the MammalMAP virtual museum or blog.

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© MammalMAP

Supplier: MammalMAP

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comprehensive Description

Temminck's Ground Pangolin (Manis temminckii, or Smutsia temminckii if Smutsia is treated as a genus rather than a subgenus) has, like other pangolins, a long muscular tail and horny scales covering its body, which protect it when it rolls up into a ball in a defensive posture. Temminck's Ground Pangolin is found in a wide range of habitat types, but is only found where abundant ants and termites of a few specific types occur, possibly explaining its absence from Ethiopia and West Africa (these insects account for most of the diet). Young Temminck's Ground Pangolins (only one offspring is born at a time) are not very active for the first month or so after birth, but subsequently ride on the mother's back or tail base, slipping onto her belly when alarmed. (Kingdon 1997)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

This species is distributed from eastern Chad from north of the forest block through parts of southern Sudan and most of East Africa to southern Africa (to about 30 degrees south). Also recorded from north-eastern Central African Republic and from south-western Ethiopia (though not from Somalia) (Swart in press). It is unclear if the distribution of this species overlaps with the range of the Giant Pangolin S. gigantea in the mosaic forest savanna north and south of the forest blocks.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Geographic Range

The Temminck's pangolin, or Cape pangolin, has a range similar to a backwards "c" stretching from Chad and Sudan in central Africa, down through Kenya and Tanzania, to the northern parts of South Africa. (Kingdon 1997)

Biogeographic Regions: ethiopian (Native )

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Historic Range:
Africa

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range

Occurs in eastern and southern Africa, from north-eastern Chad and Sudan, south to South Africa (5).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

This species measures approximately 40 - 70 cm head and body length, and about the same for the tail. Males are larger than the females.

The name of the Order of these animals, Pholidota, means, "scaled animals". The body of the Temminck's pangolin is covered with moveable, sharp scales, except for the snout, chin, throat, sides of the face, and the belly. The coloration of these scales gives this species a dark olive brown look similar to that of a pine cone and helps it to blend into many different surroundings.

Temminck's pangolins have small, pointed heads with small eyes that are protected by specialized thick eyelids. It lacks teeth, but has a very long (up to 25 cm in length and 0.5 cm in diameter) and sticky tongue for catching insects. This species also has a specialized stomach for digesting food items that have not been chewed. It has five long claws on the end of each limb and the tail is prehensile. (Minelli et al. 1997, Macdonald 1985)

Range mass: 7 to 18 kg.

Range length: 40 to 70 cm.

Sexual Dimorphism: male larger

  • Kingdon, J. 1997. The Kingdon Field Guide to African Mammals. London: Academic Press.
  • Macdonald, D. 1985. The Encyclopedia of Mammals. New York: Facts on File, Inc..
  • Minelli, A., M. Minelli. 1997. The Great Book of Animals. Philadelphia: Courage Books.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is a mostly solitary, terrestrial species that is present in various woodland and savanna habitats, often with thick undergrowth, and also in floodplain grasslands. The range is largely determined by an abundance of ants and termites of a few specific types. It can be found in farmed areas. Animals spend the daytime in underground dens. The female gives birth to a single young after a gestation of approximately 140 days; females give birth to one young per year (Swart in press).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

This species will inhabit both high- and low-rainfall habitats, including forests, thick brush, or open grasslands and savannah.

(Nowak 1999)

Habitat Regions: temperate ; tropical ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: savanna or grassland ; forest ; scrub forest

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

The ground pangolin inhabits savanna and woodland, avoiding desert or forest. They are surprisingly capable swimmers and are often found living near a water source (5).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

The diet of the Temminck's pangolin consists mainly of termites and ants, with an occasional larvae or other soft bodied insect. Ant or termite hills are discovered through the pangolin's keen sense of smell, then dismantled by its long and powerful forelimbs. The pangolin then catches the fleeing insects by flicking its long tongue in and out. It has no teeth, so the stomach has exceptionally thick muscular walls for crushing the food items, which are swallowed whole. A pangolin may also swallow stones and store them in the stomach to aid in the crushing part of the digestion. (Nowak 1999)

Animal Foods: insects

Primary Diet: carnivore (Insectivore )

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Ecosystem Roles

Temminck's pangolins are important predators of colonial insects in the ecosystems in which they live.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Predation

Pangolins use their thick, keratinized scales and powerful muscles to roll their bodies into nearly impenetrable balls. Few predators will try to capture them, although some large predators may.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Known prey organisms

Manis temminckii preys on:
Insecta

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Communication and Perception

Pangolins have an excellent sense of smell, used to find their insect prey. Little is known about intraspecific communication, but they are likely to use smells, visual cues, sounds, and touch.

Communication Channels: visual ; tactile ; acoustic ; chemical

Perception Channels: visual ; acoustic

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Reproduction

Individuals live a solitary life, only joining others during mating. Because of their excellent sense of smell, the social interactions of pangolins revolve around advertisement through the spreading of feces and the marking of trees with either urine or a secretion from an anal gland. Males may also battle fiercely for the opportunity to mate with a female.

Mating System: polygynous

Temminck's pangolins have a gestation period of about 139 days, resulting in usually one young weighing 200 - 500 grams. They are born in an underground natural shelter, and are first carried outside on the mother's back or tail at between 2 and 4 weeks of age. The young begin to harvest their own food by 3 months of age, but are still carried until they are approximately 3 kg. The females breed at any time of the year, even if they are currently rearing young. (Kingdon 1997, Macdonald 1985)

Breeding interval: The interbirth interval is unknown.

Breeding season: Pangolins breed throughout the year.

Average number of offspring: 1.

Average gestation period: 139 days.

Average weaning age: 3 months.

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; year-round breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); fertilization (Internal ); viviparous

Female pangolins care exclusively for their young, nursing, carrying, and protecting them until they have nearly reached adult size.

Parental Investment: female parental care

  • Kingdon, J. 1997. The Kingdon Field Guide to African Mammals. London: Academic Press.
  • Macdonald, D. 1985. The Encyclopedia of Mammals. New York: Facts on File, Inc..
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Hoffmann, M.

Reviewer/s
Hoffmann, M. & Stuart, S.N. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because this species is widespread, locally abundant and present in numerous protected areas. Although it is hunted, and likely declining locally in some regions, the rate of decline is not believed to be sufficient to warrant listing in Near Threatened or a threatened category.

History
  • 1996
    Lower Risk/near threatened
    (Baillie and Groombridge 1996)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Current Listing Status Summary

Status: Endangered
Date Listed: 06/14/1976
Lead Region: Foreign (Region 10) 
Where Listed: Africa


Population detail:

Population location: Africa
Listing status: E

For most current information and documents related to the conservation status and management of Manis temminckii , see its USFWS Species Profile

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Temminck's pangolins are vulnerable to population decreases because of their great economic value to humans and habitat loss to agriculture. In addition to being killed for their flesh and scales, they have several predators including lions and hyenas, are subject to brush fires, and may become electrocuted in areas where such fencing exists. (Kingdon 1997)

US Federal List: endangered

CITES: appendix ii

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Status

Classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List (1), and listed on Appendix II of CITES (3).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
This species is very widely but patchily distributed. Given its nocturnal and secretive nature, their abundance is probably underestimated. Density in the Kruger N. P. region has been estimated at 0.24/km² (Swart in press).

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
This species is selectively hunted for meat and scales (for charms), and is used for traditional medicine in a number of countries (Bräutigam et al. 1994; Swart in press). Other recorded threats to the species include poisoning with pesticides and electric fences (Swart 1996; in press).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

While the ground pangolin is widespread and in some parts common, in other areas, such as South Africa and Malawi, it is rare and threatened, believed to be largely due to hunting. The unique scales that have evolved to protect the ground pangolin from predators are now contributing to its decline, as its scales are used in some areas in love charms, and there is a belief in east Africa that burning the scales keeps lions away (5). The ground pangolin is also hunted for its flesh which is eaten and for many other parts that are used in traditional medicine (2) (5). In East Africa the ground pangolin is even known as Bwana Mganga, meaning 'Mr Doctor', which refers to the fact that all its body parts are thought to have some healing property (6). In Zimbabwe, to see a pangolin is a good omen and it is traditional to catch one and present it to superiors to be eaten (5). In addition, ground pangolins are vulnerable to being burned in bush fires and electrocuted by electric fences (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Although it has been locally exterminated in some areas, it occurs in many national parks and other protected areas (e.g. Kruger National Park, South Africa). While it is listed on Appendix II of CITES, and is protected in a number of range states (e.g. Botswana), there is a need to develop and enforce protective legislation over much of its distribution.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

The ground pangolin is protected by law in many of its range countries and occurs in several protected areas, such as Serengeti National Park in Tanzania, a World Heritage Site (5) (7). Yet a conflict remains between these laws and the traditions of native peoples (5); an issue that must be addressed to ensure a bright future for the ground pangolin.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Importance for Humans: Negative

There are no adverse effects of pangolins on humans.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

Temminck's pangolins are killed by natives in Africa for their scales and meat. The scales are taken for use in various jewelry and art. They are exported to China where the scales are prized for their supposed medicinal value as an antiseptic. The skins are also sent legally to the United States and other countries for the manufacture of leather goods, such as boots and shoes. (Nowak 1999)

Positive Impacts: food ; body parts are source of valuable material; source of medicine or drug

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Ground pangolin

The ground pangolin (Manis temminckii), also known as Temminck's pangolin or the Cape pangolin, is one of four species of pangolins which can be found in Africa, and the only one in southern and eastern Africa. The animal was named for the Dutch zoologist Coenraad Jacob Temminck.

With the exception of the underside, it is covered in extremely hard scales. When threatened, it usually will roll up into a ball thus protecting its vulnerable belly. The scales on the tail can also be used as blades to slash at attackers.

The ground pangolin can grow to a length of about 1 m, with the tail typically between 30 and 50 cm. It has a disproportionately small head, powerful hindlegs, and small forelegs. Capable of walking on two legs, the ground pangolin walks on its hindlegs when searching for food while using its forelegs and tail for balance.

Like other pangolin species it is largely nocturnal, although it is also entirely terrestrial, and usually found in savanna or open woodland. It is well adapted to a diet of ants and termites, possessing a keen sense of smell and a very long (up to 50 cm) sticky tongue that extends deep into its abdominal cavity. Although it is capable of digging its own burrow, the ground pangolin prefers to occupy those abandoned by warthogs or aardvarks or to lie in dense vegetation, making it even more difficult to observe.

The ground pangolin is listed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List: “This species is widespread, locally abundant and present in numerous protected areas. Although it is hunted, and likely declining locally in some regions, the rate of decline is not believed to be sufficient to warrant listing in Near Threatened or a threatened category.”[2]

Image gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schlitter, D. A. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M, eds. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 531. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  2. ^ a b Pietersen, D., Waterman, C., Hywood, L., Rankin, P. & Soewu, D. (2014). "Manis temminckii". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 2014-07-29. 

Sources[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!