Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

A small slender Hyperolius (20-27 mm) from the savanna of the western part of West Africa, the sexes of equal size and with the same pattern. Dorsum with a dark vertebral line and two dark dorsolateral lines delimiting a light line. Pupil horizontal.

Very similar to H. nasutus in many characters such as body dimensions, habitat preference and pattern, with H. nasutus showing a tendency towards the same five dark stripes on the back. The stripes in lamottei, especially in its eastern populations, are however much more distinct, and are also present in females (West African females of H. nasutus are unstriped). The two species are almost sympatric in central Côte d’Ivoire (near Lamto) without signs of transition. Generally H. lamottei seems to vicariate for H. nasutus.

The tadpole has a tooth formula of 1/1+1,1 which is one tooth row less than other members of the genus.

This account was taken from "Treefrogs of Africa" by Arne Schiøtz with kind permission from Edition Chimaira publishers, Frankfurt am Main.

  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in southern Senegal, Sierra Leone, southern Guinea, northern Liberia and western Côte d’Ivoire. There is an outlying population at Lamto in central-southern Côte d’Ivoire, and it is speculated that this is introduced. It presumably occurs in Guinea-Bissau, but there have not so far been any records. It occurs mainly at reasonably high altitudes, up to 1,500m asl on Mount Nimba, but the population at Lamto is at a very low elevation.
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Distribution and Habitat

A common and abundant savanna form from western West Africa.

  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is a species of high-altitude grassland, savannah and gallery forests, living in particular in areas subject to flooding. The eggs are laid directly in water, usually in small, temporary pools and swamps with abundant grassy vegetation.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Mark-Oliver Rödel, Arne Schiøtz

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
It is a common species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

The males call from grass covering small temporary puddles. The voice is a shrill, high-pitched sound, quite unlike other Hyperolius voices. An analysis shows that the voice, which has a duration of 0.06-0.08 sec and a frequency intensity maximum of 3500-4000 cps, is made up of a large number of harmonics about 400 cps apart.

The eggs may be placed under water as in H. nasutus. They are small with a white and black pole. The jelly is clear.

  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
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Threats

Major Threats
It appears to be a reasonably adaptable species and is unlikely to be significantly threatened.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It occurs in the Mount Nimba World Heritage Site (Guinea, Liberia, Côte d’Ivoire), Mont Peko National Park (Côte d’Ivoire), Niokolo-Koba National Park (Senegal), and probably in several other protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Hyperolius lamottei

Hyperolius lamottei is a species of frog in the Hyperoliidae family. It is found in Ivory Coast, Guinea, Liberia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and possibly Guinea-Bissau. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, moist savanna, subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland, swamps, intermittent freshwater lakes, intermittent freshwater marshes, rural gardens, and heavily degraded former forest.

References[edit]

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