Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

M 24-26 mm, F 27-33 mm. Tibiotarsal articulation reaches snout tip or beyond. Fifth toe longer than third toe. Femoral glands in males often small and not very prominent. Frenal stripe indistinct, fading under the eye and not continued until nostril. Ventrally often with a dark throat with a light median line. Dorsally often with a diamond-shaped marking (Glaw and Vences 2007).

Taken with permission from Glaw and Vences (2007) and Nussbaum et. al (2008).

  • Nussbaum, R., Glaw, F., and Andreone, F. (2008). Mantidactylus opiparis. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 07 April 2009.
  • Glaw, F., and Vences, M. (2007). Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Madagascar. Third Edition. Vences and Glaw Verlag, Köln.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species ranges widely in eastern Madagascar from Tsaratanana south to Ranomafana. There are also two isolated localities in west-central Madagascar (Ambohijanahary and Mahajeby Forest), and one on the central plateau at Ambohitantely. It has been recorded at 600-1,500m asl, but probably also occurs lower than this.
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Distribution and Habitat

Species is located in Ambohitantely, Ambolokopatrika corridor, An’Ala, Andasibe, Andavaka, Andrangoloaka, Anjanaharibe, Antsahamanara (Tsaratanana), Antsahamanintsy, Besariaka, Ifanadiana, Ilampy, Lac Alaotra, Mahajeby, Mandraka, Marojejy, Niagarakely, Ranomafana, Tsararano, Vohiparara (Glaw and Vences 2007).

It has been recorded at 600-1500 m asl, but probably also occurs lower than this range (Nussbaum et. al 2008).

  • Nussbaum, R., Glaw, F., and Andreone, F. (2008). Mantidactylus opiparis. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 07 April 2009.
  • Glaw, F., and Vences, M. (2007). Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Madagascar. Third Edition. Vences and Glaw Verlag, Köln.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is a streamside species living on the ground in pristine and very slightly degraded rainforest. It breeds in brooks and streams.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Ronald Nussbaum, Frank Glaw, Franco Andreone

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
It is a very common species.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Habits: A widespread species along rainforest streams at mid-altitudes throughout Madagascar, although it is less commonly found than M. melanopleura. Males call mostly during the day from concealed positions near the streams (up to 10 m distance), but sometimes also from up to 50 cm high in the vegetation. Single specimens were also found calling at night from 2 m above the ground in bushes. M. opiparis and M. melanopleura often form mixed choruses during the day. Boosts of calling activity are often emitted after longer silence, and these boosts can then run wave-like along the stream (Glaw and Vences 2007).

Calls: Series of 23-35 short pulsed notes. Notes are longer and call series slower than in M. melanopleura (Glaw and Vences 2007).

  • Nussbaum, R., Glaw, F., and Andreone, F. (2008). Mantidactylus opiparis. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 07 April 2009.
  • Glaw, F., and Vences, M. (2007). Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Madagascar. Third Edition. Vences and Glaw Verlag, Köln.
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Threats

Major Threats
Its forest habitat is receding due to subsistence agriculture, timber extraction, charcoal manufacture, and invasive spread of eucalyptus, livestock grazing and expanding human settlements.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

This species is listed as least concern because of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category. Though it occurs in many protected areas, its forest habitat is receding due to subsistence agriculture, timber extraction, charcoal manufacture, and invasive spread of eucalyptus, livestock grazing and expanding human settlements (Nussbaum et. al 2008).

  • Nussbaum, R., Glaw, F., and Andreone, F. (2008). Mantidactylus opiparis. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 07 April 2009.
  • Glaw, F., and Vences, M. (2007). Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Madagascar. Third Edition. Vences and Glaw Verlag, Köln.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It occurs in many protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Mantidactylus opiparis

Mantidactylus opiparis is a species of frog in the Mantellidae family. It is endemic to Madagascar. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and rivers. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References[edit]

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