Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in the Upland Succulent Karoo biome, from Nuwerus, just north of the low-lying Knersvlakte, in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa, north to the Hunsberg in Namibia. It is absent from a narrow strip along the coast.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

C. namaquense is found throughout Namaqualand, South Africa (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Scott, E.

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

C. namaquense is highly cryptic with blotches of beige, brown and stippled markings that break up its outline, enabling it to blend with the granite substrate (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Scott, E.

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is associated with the distribution of granitic inselbergs in dry shrubland and semi-desert. It probably spends a large proportion of its time aestivating in cracks and under layers of granite. It is only active after suitably large rainfall events. It breeds in any small body of water that can hold water for a sufficiently long period to enable the tadpoles to complete their development, such as pools in rocky streambeds, and eroded "tanks" in the granitic bedrock, which have good water holding abilities.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Habitat and Ecology

C. namaquense occurs in the winter-rainfall regions of Namaqualand with Succulent Karoo vegetation. The annual precipitation is low, averaging 150–300 mm (Schulze 1997). This species shelters under stones and exfoliating granite or in cracks during the dry season, emerging in wet periods to feed and reproduce (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Scott, E.

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Males engage in territorial disputes when other males approach too closely. The only known predators are large toads (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Scott, E.

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

Advertisement Call

Calling has been recorded after rains in July, August, September, October, November, March and April. Little is known of the breeding biology of this species. Males call from beneath vegetation or from exposed positions at or near the water’s edge. The advertisement call is a repeated, nasal bleat, frequently followed by a clicking territorial call. Calling is antiphonal, producing an almost continuous chorus (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Scott, E.

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Breeding takes place in temporary pools formed in eroded “tanks” in granitic bedrock, rocky streambeds, permanent pools and seeps, but the species has also adapted well to breeding in man-made dams, quarries and borrow-pits. Breeding is opportunistic and correlated with sparse rainfall events (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Scott, E.

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group

Reviewer/s
Stuart, S.N.

Contributor/s
Channing, A., Scott-Prendini, E. & Minter, L.

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its relatively wide distribution and presumed large population.

History
  • 2004
    Least Concern
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

C. namaquense does not appear to be threatened. It is known to occur in two protected areas: the Richtersveld Contractual National Park and the Goegap Nature Reserve (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Scott, E.

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
It appears to occur in fairly large populations, but it is seldom encountered due to the low numbers of days per year that it is active (as a result of the low rainfall), and the poor collecting effort in its range.

Population Trend
Unknown
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
Some populations are probably being impacted by mining for copper and quarrying for granite. Otherwise, it is probably not facing any threats.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It occurs in the Richtersveld Contractual National Park and in the Goegap Wildflower Reserve. Its presence in the Namaqualand National Park and Ai-Ais Fish River Canyon Trans-frontier National Park (in Namibia) is unconfirmed but likely.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Namaqua caco

The Namaqua caco or Namaqua dainty frog (Cacosternum namaquense) is a species of frog in the Pyxicephalidae family found in Namibia and South Africa. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, intermittent rivers, intermittent freshwater marshes, freshwater springs, and rocky areas. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References[edit]


Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!