Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic occurs in north-eastern New South Wales from Mount Hyland in the north to Gloucester Tops in the south, in the northern and central northern mountains of New South Wales.
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Distribution and Habitat

North-eastern New South Wales from Mt Hyland in the north to Gloucester Tops in the south. In the northern and central northern mountains of New South Wales.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 9200 km2.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is found in montane subtropical rainforest and wet sclerophyll forest where the rainfall is high (1,500mm annually). It lives in extensive beds of sphagnum moss and seepages on steep slopes. It is a spring-summer breeder, with diurnal calling. About 40-60 large eggs are laid in moist spots such as in rock crevices, under logs or in burrows made in sphagnum moss. In aquatic situations the larvae may be found in the silt of small pools. Larvae remain in the nest and feed off the yolk. They generally emerge after one month. Males tend to the nests whilst the females move on after about five days.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1ab(iii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Ed Meyer, John Clarke

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Endangered because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 5,000 km2, its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat in New South Wales, Australia.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
There are no documented declines in this species.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Found in montane subtropical rainforest and wet sclerophyll forest where the rainfall is high (1500 mm annually). Lives in extensive beds of sphagnum moss and seepages on steep slopes.Spring - summer breeder, diurnal calling. About 40 - 60 large eggs are laid in moist spots such as in rock crevices, under logs or in burrows made in sphagnum moss. In aquatic situations the tadpoles may be found in the silt of small pools. Tadpoles remain in nest and feed off yolk. They generally emerge after one month. Males tend to the nests whilst the females move on after about 5 days.

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Threats

Major Threats
In the past a considerable area of the species' habitat was cleared or logged, but the majority of the habitat is now in reserves and protected from clearing or timber harvesting. However, disturbances upstream that affect hydrological processes and/or water quality may threaten the species. Stock (cattle) has been observed at a number of breeding sites.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines in population or range.

Threats
In the past a considerable area of the species habitat was cleared or logged. A majority of the habitat is now in reserves and protected from clearing or timber harvesting.Disturbances upstream that affect hydrological processes and/or water quality may threaten the species.Stock (cattle) have been observed at a number of breeding sites.

Conservation Measures
Listed as vulnerable in New South Wales and therefore is protected by legislation in that state. Most of its habitat occurs within National Parks and State Forests including Mt Boss State Forest.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is listed as vulnerable in New South Wales and is therefore protected by legislation in that state. Most of its habitat occurs within national parks and state forests, including Mount Boss State Forest.
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Wikipedia

Sphagnum frog

The Sphagnum Frog (Philoria sphagnicolus) is a species of frog in the Myobatrachidae family. Its natural habitats are subtropical moist upland forests, subtropical moist montane forests, and Streams. They vary in color from shades of yellow and orange. They usually have irregular black spots that range all over their body. Their main source of diet comes from small insects and that are usually ants. This species has been classified as endangered in 2004. It is threatened by Climate Change Pathogens and habitat loss. It is endemic to Australia. There have been other recommendations by scientist and other groups made to protect this species. Some of these recommendations are exclude logging around breeding areas, prevent pollution of streams and wetlands, and maintain vegetation and deep-leaf litter around streams.

References[edit]

Sphagnum Frog - profile [1]

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