Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic occurs in the southwest and central zones of Western Australia. The estimated altitudinal range of the species is from 0-600m asl.
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Distribution and Habitat

Southwest and central zones of Western Australia.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 537900 km2

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species is found on impervious soils that are lightly vegetated. It is an opportunistic breeder emerging and spawning after heavy rainfall. Eggs are deposited in pools on clay soil where the water is milky and opaque. In "Habitat preferences" "other" refers to "clay pans".

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Neobatrachus kunapalari

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 54
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Dale Roberts

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because its population is not believed to be in decline at present.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
It is a common species.

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Found on impervious soils that are lightly vegetated.Opportunistic breeder emerging and spawning after heavy rainfall. Eggs are deposited in pools on clay soil where the water is milky and opaque.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats to the species.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines and extent of occurrence > 20,000km2.

Threats
None known.

Conservation Measures
None in place.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Its range includes multiple protected areas in Western Australia
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Wikipedia

Kunapalari frog

The Kunapalari Frog (Neobatrachus kunapalari) is a species of frog in the Myobatrachidae family. It is endemic to Australia. Its natural habitats are temperate shrubland, Mediterranean-type shrubby vegetation, subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland, and intermittent freshwater marshes.

References[edit]

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