Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic is known from south-central Queensland throughout central New South Wales and into central Victoria.
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Distribution and Habitat

From south-central Queensland throughout central New South Wales and into central Victoria.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 911900 km2

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is an inhabitant of dry regions. It is found in woodlands, shrublands, mallee and open grassland as well as disturbed areas. It becomes active after rains and is buried in loam or clay soils much of the time. It breeds after heavy rain and flooding. Males call whilst floating in open, shallow and still water. Eggs are clumped together and are wrapped around and adhered to submerged vegetation in ponds, dams, ditches and flooded clay pans. Tadpoles are aquatic and take 4-7 months to develop. In "habitat preferences" "other" refers to "clay pans".

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Ed Meyer, John Clarke, Peter Robertson, Frank Lemckert

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
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Population

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

An inhabitant of dry regions. Found in woodlands, shrublands, mallee and open grassland and disturbed areas. Becomes active after rains and is buried in soft loam or clay soils much of the time.Breeds after heavy rain and flooding. Males call whilst floating in open, shallow and still water. Eggs are contained within long jelly strings and are wrapped around submerged vegetation in ponds, dams, ditches and flooded claypans. Tadpoles are aquatic and may take 4- 7 months to develop.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
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Threats

Major Threats
Habitat loss/degradation associated with the expansion of agro-industry farming is a threat in some parts of the species' range.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines and extent of occurrence > 20,000km2.

Threats
None known.

Conservation Measures
None in place.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of the species includes several protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Sudell's frog

The Sudell's frog or painted burrowing frog (Neobatrachus sudelli) is a species of burrowing frog common to a large part of southeastern Australia. It is found on and west of the Great Dividing Range of New South Wales to western Victoria and southern Queensland as well as far eastern South Australia.

Physical description[edit]

Sudell's Frog showing entirely filled in metatarsal tubercle on back, left foot.

The Sudell's frog is relatively small, reaching only 40 mm in length. It is highly variable and is generally brown, however it may also be grey, yellow or reddish on the dorsal surface with irregular darker spots or blotches. There is often a pale mid-dorsal stripe running down the back. The belly is smooth and pale cream or white. The toes are fully webbed, however a deep indentation is present between the webbing of each toe. The metatarsal tubercles (a shovel like structure on the foot to assist with burrowing) are completely black. The pupil is vertical and iris is silver.

Ecology and behaviour[edit]

Sudell's frog inhabits ponds, dams, ditches, clay pans or any still water in woodland, shrubland, and disturbed areas (including farmland). Males make a short trilling sound while floating in water after heavy rains, which flood the breeding area, from late winter through to autumn. The species is an adapted burrower and will often spend periods of time underground to avoid drought conditions.

About 600 eggs are laid in a clump entwined among vegetation near the surface, however will sink if disturbed. Hatching occurs about 3 days after laying and tadpoles are plump and large reaching about 77 mm (at about stage 40). The tadpoles often overwinter and metamorphs measure from about 20 to 30mm in length.

Similar species[edit]

It is similar to other species of Neobatrachus, particularly the painted burrowing frog (Neobatrachus pictus), from which it can be distinguished by baggy skin around the groin not being present in N. pictus. It is also similar to the ornate burrowing frog (Platyplectrum ornatum) and Heleioporus from which it can be distinguished by a fully black metatarsal, webbed toes and vertical pupil.

As a pet[edit]

It is kept as a pet,[1] in Australia this animal may be kept in captivity with the appropriate permit.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mark Davidson. 2005. Australian Reptile Keeper Publications. ISBN 0-9758200-0-1
  • Anstis, M. 2002. Tadpoles of South-eastern Australia. Reed New Holland: Sydney. ISBN 1-876334-63-0
  • Robinson, M. 2002. A Field Guide to Frogs of Australia. Australian Museum/Reed New Holland: Sydney. ISBN 1-876334-83-5
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