Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic is found in the south-west corner of Western Australia, near Walpole and in Nornalup National Park, from 0-300m asl.
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Distribution and Habitat

Found in the southwest corner of Western Australia, near Walpole and in Nornalup National Park.The area of occupancy of the species is approximately 200 km2.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is found in dense vegetation adjacent to streams, and also hides in wet forest litter on peaty sand. Males call from tunnels in hummocks of mud or clay covered with low matted vegetation, where females lay 25-30 eggs. The larvae undergo direct development and emerge after approximately 50 days.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Geocrinia lutea

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
NT
Near Threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Dale Roberts, Jean-Marc Hero

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Near Threatened because although the species appears not to be in decline, and its habitat is well protected, its Extent of Occurrence is much less than 5,000 km2, thus making the species close to qualifying for Vulnerable.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
This is a common species that occurs at many sites within its restricted range.

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Found in dense vegetation adjacent to streams. Hides in wet forest litter on peaty sand.Males call from tunnels in hummocks of mud or clay covered with low matted vegetation. Females lay 25 - 30 eggs in these tunnels. The larvae develop in the eggs and complete development in approximately 50 days, leaving the nest as small frogs.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
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Threats

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines despite having a small area of occupancy. Habitat protected within Nornalup National Park. Frequently spotted within its range.

Threats
None known.

Conservation Measures
None in place for the species, but its habitat is protected within Nornalup National Park.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
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Major Threats
Too frequent fires can be a major threat to the species. However, most of its habitat is protected so it is not significantly threatened.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Its habitat is protected within Walpole-Nornalup National Park and Mount Frankland National Park, and most of its range is within state forest. There are many new protected areas also being created in this region.
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Wikipedia

Geocrinia lutea

Geocrinia lutea is a species of frog in the Myobatrachidae family. It is sometimes named for the nearby towns, thus the Nornalup or Walpole frog. It is endemic to Southwest Australia, home to five of the seven cogenors in the Geocrinia family.

It is threatened by habitat loss and an altered fire regime, this and other factors contributed to the 2004 reassessment as Near Threatened (NT). The habit, appearance and ecology is similar to that of the species, Geocrinia rosea.

See also[edit]

References[edit]


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