Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic is found in southern Victoria and eastern Tasmania, and a small population in northwestern Tasmania, as well as the Bass Strait Islands. The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 99,400km2.
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Distribution and Habitat

Found in southern Victoria and eastern Tasmania and the Bass Strait Islands.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 99400 km2

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Martin, A. A., and Littlejohn, M. J. (1982). Tasmanian Amphibians. University of Tasmania, Hobart.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
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Physical Description

Type Information

Paratype for Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Catalog Number: USNM 118771
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Year Collected: 1928
Locality: Millgrove, Victoria, Australia
  • Paratype: Loveridge, A. 1933. Occ. Pap. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist. 8: 91.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species inhabits dry forest, woodland, shrubland, grassland and heaths at lower elevations. They shelter under leaf-litter and other debris in moist soaks and depressions. Late summer to early winter breeding (February to June). Between 70 and 170 eggs are laid in shallow burrows under litter or in grassy depressions in low areas near water. The nests are often covered over with soil. The burrows are flooded after heavy rain and tadpoles released into pools. Tadpoles develop in 6-8 months.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Graeme Gillespie, Peter Robertson, Harold Cogger

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2002
    Data Deficient
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Population

Population
Some declines are suspected, but the population sizes and trends are unknown.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Dry forest, woodland, shrubland, grassland and heaths at lower elevations. They shelter under leaf litter and other debris in moist soaks and depressions.Late summer to early winter breeding (February to June). Between 70 and 170 eggs are laid in shallow burrows under litter or in grassy depressions in low areas near water. The nests are often covered over with soil. The burrows are flooded after heavy rain and tadpoles released into pools. Tadpoles develop in 6 - 8 months.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Martin, A. A., and Littlejohn, M. J. (1982). Tasmanian Amphibians. University of Tasmania, Hobart.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
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Threats

Major Threats
Infrastructure development and agro-industry farming are threats to the species habitat.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Current status uncertain. Some declines suspected. Population sizes and trends unknown.

Threats
None known.

Conservation Measures
None in place.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Martin, A. A., and Littlejohn, M. J. (1982). Tasmanian Amphibians. University of Tasmania, Hobart.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of the species includes a few protected areas.
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