Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic is found in the southern mountain ranges of Tasmania and is known from approximately 15 locations. The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 4,200km2, and is bounded by Hartz Mountains in the northeast, Mount Sprent in the northwest, Mount La Perouse in the southeast and Bathurst Harbour in the southwest. It occurs down to sea level in southwest Tasmania.
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Distribution and Habitat

Range and Population
In the southern mountain ranges of Tasmania in approximately 15 locations. The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 4200 km2 and is bounded by Hartz Mountains in the north-east, Mt Sprent in the north-west, Mt La Perouse in the south-east and Bathurst Harbour in the south-west.

Habitat and Ecology
Moist, cool, alpine habitat. Poorly drained sites in moorland (shrubland and heath) and rainforest.

In spring and early summer, males call from the ground beneath rocks, logs and low dense vegetation and breeding chambers with sphagnum and lichen. Females spend breeding season in a chamber with a male. About 6-15 eggs are laid in nests in moss or lichen. Direct development.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Rounsevell, D.E., Ziegeler, D., Brown, P.B., Davies, M., and Littlejohn, M.J. (1994). '' A new genus and species of frog (Anura: Leptodactylidae: Myobatrachinae) from southern Tasmania.'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia , 118(3), 171-185.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species inhabits moist, cool, alpine habitat; poorly drained sites in moor land (shrubland and heath) and rainforest. In spring and early summer, males call from the ground and low dense vegetation and breeding chambers with sphagnum and lichen. Females spend breeding season in a chamber with a male. About 6-15 eggs are laid in nests in moss or lichen. It is a species that breeds by direct development.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Peter Brown

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because, although its Extent of Occurrence is probably less than 5,000 km2, it is common, occurs in habitats that are not significantly threatened, and does not appear to be in decline.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
There are at least 10,000 individuals.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
None known, but it has been noted that nests are vulnerable to trampling by animals and people (researchers or tourists).
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

None known, but it has been noted nests are vulnerable to trampling by animals and people (researchers or tourists).

Conservation Measures
Habitat is mostly within reserves.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Rounsevell, D.E., Ziegeler, D., Brown, P.B., Davies, M., and Littlejohn, M.J. (1994). '' A new genus and species of frog (Anura: Leptodactylidae: Myobatrachinae) from southern Tasmania.'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia , 118(3), 171-185.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The habitat of the species is mostly within protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Moss froglet

The moss froglet or moss frog (Crinia nimbus) is a species of frog in the family Myobatrachidae. It is endemic to Tasmania. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, temperate shrubland, and swamps.

References

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