Overview

Distribution

Range Description

There are three known populations of this Australian endemic species, one in the Atherton Tablelands in northeastern Queensland, one in the Clarke Range in mid-eastern Queensland and one occurring from Mount Tamborine (Southeast Queensland) to Ballina northeastern New South Wales. The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 190,000km2.
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Distribution and Habitat

Three populations. Atherton Tablelands in north-eastern Queensland, Clarke Range inmid-eastern Queensland and from Mount Tamborine (Southeast Queensland) to Ballina north-eastern New South Wales.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 190000 km2Locally abundant. No information on population size and structure. No declines recorded.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found from coastal swamps and ponds to montane rainforests. It is a spring and summer breeder. It breeds in still water (swamps and ponds) where males call from reeds and grasses around or in water; larvae are free-swimming. It is also found in pastureland.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Ed Meyer, John Clarke

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
This species is locally abundant. There is no information on population size and structure. There have been no recorded declines.

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

From coastal swamps and ponds to montane rainforests.Spring and summer breeder. Breeds in still water (swamps and ponds) where males call from reeds and grasses around or in water.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
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Threats

Major Threats
Some sites continue to be disturbed through clearing, timber harvesting and associated activities and cattle grazing. Although the species is quite frequently detected at disturbed sites, like farm dams, the viability of these populations is unknown as are the impacts of disturbance on the species.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No declines recorded and extent of occurrence > 20,000km2.

Threats
Some sites continue to be disturbed through clearing, timber harvesting and associated activities and cattle grazing. Although the species is quite frequently detected in disturbed sites, like farm dams, the viability of these populations is unknown as are the impacts of disturbance on the species.

Conservation Measures
Listed as rare in Queensland and protected in SEQ where some of its habitat occurs in Lamington National Park.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Listed as rare in Queensland and protected in southeast Queensland where some of its habitat occurs in Lamington National Park. Its range includes a few other protected areas as well.
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Wikipedia

Revealed frog

The revealed tree frog or whirring tree frog, (Litoria revelata) is a species of tree frog native to coastal eastern Australia.

Contents

Distribution

It is distributed in four separate populations. Two populations occur exclusively in Queensland; these are the most northern population in Atherton Tableland in northern Queensland; another population occurs in the Clarke Range in mid-northern Queensland,and a population is found on the border of Queensland and New South Wales. This population is from Ballina, New South Wales, to Tamborine National Park, Queensland. The most southern population, also the largest, occurs in mid-northern New South Wales. This population is distributed between Ourimbah in the south and the Myall Lakes National Park in the north, also a population occurs around Port Macquarie, but this is part of the southern population. These four population may represent more than one species.

Physical description

This frog reaches 40 mm in length. It is cream to red-brown on the back, with a darker band running down the middle. Males turn bright yellow in colour during the bredding season. A dark strip runs from the nostril to the shoulder, across the tympanum. The back the legs are red and the thigh is yellow-orange. Some large black dots occur on the thigh and the backs of legs. The belly is cream and the iris is golden.

Ecology and behaviour

This species is associated with dam impondments, ditches, swamps, and still areas of streams in heathland, wet or dry sclerophyll forest, and rainforest. Males make a high-pitched whirring noise, similar to the Verreaux's tree frog; calling occurs from spring to autumn, either from the ground or from vegetation bordering the breeding area.

Further reading

  • Anstis, M. 2002. Tadpoles of South-eastern Australia. Reed New Holland: Sydney.
  • Robinson, M. 2002. A Field Guide to Frogs of Australia. Australian Museum/Reed New Holland: Sydney.
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