Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Males usually are about 50-55 mm in length, but may grow up to 65 mm. Females grow up to about 80 mm. Its large size usually distinguishes it from other species living near it. Varies highly in color: plain, pale, brown or bright leaf-green on the dorsal side with a dark line or band of yellow and brown blotches that distinctly cut off the dorsal color. Sometimes has a dark hour-glass mark on back and usually conspicuous white ridges running down the posterior sides of limbs. Sometimes very dark, nearly black, on the dorsal side without any markings, or has green or golden dorsal side with black reticulation. All have a whitish ventral surface with a varied amount of brown blotches and a fair amount of webbing between third and fourth fingers (Menzies 1975).

  • Zweifel, R. G. (1980). ''Results of the Archbold Expeditions 103. Frogs and lizards from the Huon Peninsula, Papua New-Guinea.'' Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 165, 390-434.
  • Menzies, J. I. (1975). Handbook of Common New Guinea Frogs. Wau Ecology Institute, Papua New Guinea.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species is widespread in the upland forests of New Guinea from Okapa in the central-eastern highlands of Papua New Guinea including the Huon Peninsular, to the Anggi Lakes region of the Vogelkop Peninsula, Papua, Indonesia. It is also known from Agaun in Milne Bay Province, southeastern Papua New Guinea. It occurs between 1,200-3,300m asl.
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Distribution and Habitat

Ranges along central mountainous spine of New Guinea from Vogelkop Peninsula to Garaina (Zweifel 1980). Prefers vegetation along small rivers; sometimes in forests away from the water where it can be found alongside L. arfakiana (Menzies 1975).

  • Zweifel, R. G. (1980). ''Results of the Archbold Expeditions 103. Frogs and lizards from the Huon Peninsula, Papua New-Guinea.'' Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 165, 390-434.
  • Menzies, J. I. (1975). Handbook of Common New Guinea Frogs. Wau Ecology Institute, Papua New Guinea.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs along torrential mountain streams in rainforest. It breeds in fast moving, cold streams. It has not been recorded from disturbed areas.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Litoria angiana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Stephen Richards, Fred Parker

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
It appears to be abundant wherever it occurs, and certainly numbers at least in the millions.

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Call: Quiet, short, rather slow, trill lasts about half a second; frequency is limited to a narrow band, giving a somewhat musical, ringing sound. Males call while usually perched in vegetation alongside rivers and creeks, and can usually be heard above the sound of running water (Menzies 1975).

Reproduction: Eggs are large and unpigmented. Tadpoles are typical of frogs that are adapted to breed in similar places; the only difference is in size (Menzies 1975).

  • Zweifel, R. G. (1980). ''Results of the Archbold Expeditions 103. Frogs and lizards from the Huon Peninsula, Papua New-Guinea.'' Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 165, 390-434.
  • Menzies, J. I. (1975). Handbook of Common New Guinea Frogs. Wau Ecology Institute, Papua New Guinea.
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Threats

Major Threats
Its upland forest habitat in mainland New Guinea is in good condition, and there are no threats currently identified.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Given the declines of torrent-dwelling hylids in Australia, monitoring programs should be initiated for this species. Its range includes a few protected areas, however these areas require better management.
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Wikipedia

Angiana tree frog

The angiana tree frog (Litoria angiana) is a species of frog in the family Hylidae. It is found in West Papua in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and rivers.

References

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