Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

A medium-sized bushland Hyperolius (males 25-27 mm, females 30-32 mm) from the western central forests. Dorsum either with hourglass pattern or with light dorsolateral stripes. Pupil horizontal.

It occurs in two morphs, the first of which is silvery-white on dorsum with two large dark blotches forming an hour-glass shape on the anterior back and a transverse bar in the lumbar region. The second morph has vivid cream or silvery-white dorsolateral stripes on a dark background. In the populations from R. Congo some males and many of the females are green with light dorsolateral stripes.

Much confusion has surrounded this species, partly because of its variation, partly because several quite different species have been treated as subspecies of H. platyceps. Amiet (1978) has clarified the matter and I follow him in regarding the forms in the "platyceps-complex" as full species (platyceps, langi, major). Amiet has also clarified the relationships between H. platyceps, H. kuligae and H. adametzi, three Hyperolius which in Cameroun can easily be confused, and with the similar, West African H. sylvaticus.

Amiet notes that in voice and habitat preference this species is similar to H. concolor, and that the two species seem to vicariate for each other with a non-overlapping distribution in western Cameroun.

This account was taken from "Treefrogs of Africa" by Arne Schiøtz with kind permission from Edition Chimaira publishers, Frankfurt am Main.

  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species ranges from southern Cameroon south of the Sanaga River to central Democratic Republic of Congo and northern Angola. There are records from Equatorial Guinea, Central African Republic, Gabon, and Congo. It is presumed to occur in the Cabinda Enclave of Angola. This species and Hyperolius concolor appear to avoid each other. If H. lomamiensis and H. olbrechtsi are synonyms of this species, then it also extends as far as southeastern Democratic Republic of Congo. However, pending clarification of these points, the distribution map reflects a more restricted understanding of H. platyceps.
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Distribution and Habitat

A bushland form distributed in southern Cameroun south of Sanaga River to R. D. Congo and possibly further south and east. I have collected a sample at Salonga N. P., R. D. Congo.

  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Head is rather large, as long as broad and much depressed. Snout is rounded; loreal region is oblique. Interorbital space is broader than the upper eyelid. Tympanum is hidden. Outer fingers are one-fourth webbed. Toes are two-thirds webbed; disks rather large. The tibio-tarsal articulation reaches the eye. Skin is smooth, faintly areolate on the belly (Boulenger, 1900).

Dorsum is pale brownish with a large blackish-brown marking with indentations extending from between the eyes to the sacral region. Sides of head, body and upper surface of legs are blackish brown. A whitish spot is present on the leg above the tibio-tarsal articulation. Upper surface of the thigh are whitish, with a narrow dark brown streak. Venter is white (Boulenger, 1900).

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Size

The type specimen measures 29 mm from snout to vent (Boulenger, 1900).

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It lives in dense, degraded secondary habitats in the forest belt, and breeds in swamp forest, raphia swamps, artificial ponds, and still-water areas in braided streams. It does not occur in closed-canopy forest, though it may occur occasionally in clearings in mature forest. It does not live in grass-dominated habitats.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group

Reviewer/s
Stuart, S.N.

Contributor/s
Schiøtz, A., Amiet, J.-L. & Burger, M.

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats and its presumed large population.

History
  • 2004
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
It is an abundant species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Two types of calls are made: sharp clicks uttered singly or in twos, and a short rattle. According to Amiet the usual call is a click with a nasal quality, while the rattle is a territorial call, uttered less frequently.

According to Largen and Dowsett Lemaire, it breeds in flooded swamp-forest.

  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
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Threats

Major Threats
It is an adaptable species that does not appear to be facing any significant threats.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It presumably occurs in a number of protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Hyperolius platyceps

Hyperolius platyceps is a species of frog in the Hyperoliidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, and Gabon. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical swamps, rivers, shrub-dominated wetlands, swamps, freshwater marshes, intermittent freshwater marshes, rural gardens, heavily degraded former forest, and ponds.

References[edit]

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