Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species can be found in south-central Texas, USA and in central Querétaro, Mexico. It can be found between 1,000-2,000m asl (Nieto Montes de Oca and Pérez Ramos, 1998).
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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Global Range: South-central Texas and Chihuahua, Mexico (Lemos-Espinal et al. 2001). M. J. Forstner (in Dixon 2000) suspects that Eleutherodactylus guttilatus from the Big Bend region of western Texas may actually be a variant of E. marnockii.

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Physical Description

Size

Length: 4 cm

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Cracks, caves, and crevices in cliffs and limestone hills in areas of woodland, scrubland, grassland, and desert; also among human-generated debris and on watered lawns (Bartlett and Bartlett, 1999). Species is somewhat tolerant of suburbanization. It lays eggs on land in a moist, sheltered site.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Comments: Cracks, caves, and crevices in cliffs and limestone hills in areas of woodland, scrubland, grassland, and desert; also among human-generated debris and on watered lawns (Bartlett and Bartlett 1999). Lays eggs on land in a moist, sheltered site.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Comments: Probably eats various small terrestrial invertebrates.

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

Lays up to 3 clutches annually; egg-laying peaks in April or May but may occur from late February to early December. Larval stage is passed in egg capsule.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Geoffrey Hammerson

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2004
    Least Concern
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Secure populations exist throughout most of the historical range in Texas; recently reported from Chihuahua, Mexico; species is somewhat tolerant of suburbanization.

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Population

Population
Total adult population size is unknown; it is secretive and easily overlooked. It is rather common but somewhat localized and seldom seen (Bartlett and Bartlett, 1999).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
The major threats are unknown.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Studies on population trends and threats are needed.
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Wikipedia

Cliff chirping frog

The cliff chirping frog (Eleutherodactylus marnockii) is a small leptodactylid frog found in the United States, in central and western Texas.

Contents

Description

Cliff frogs are 0.75 to 1.5 inches in length, and are an olive green or tan in coloration with brown or black mottling, often with banding on the rear legs. They have somewhat flattened bodies which allow them to hide in rock crevices. They have no or little webbing between their toes.

Behavior and habitat

Cliff chirping frogs are nocturnal and live most of their lives on limestone rock faces, often near emerging springs. Like most frogs, they will hop, but they are also capable of crawling, which aids them in hiding in rock crevices. Though primarily found around rocky areas, they are also common in forested regions, any area with a moderate amount of moisture, but is not actually a pool of water or stream. Their primary diets include small insects.

Cliff chirping frog, Eleutherodactylus marnockii

Reproduction

Breeding occurs year round, except at the coldest times of the winter, but generally peaks during the rainy season in April and May. Females can lay up to three clutches of eggs a year, in a moist substrate of leaf litter or soil.

References

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: The taxonomic status of Eleutherodactylus in the Big Bend region of western Texas needs further study (see Dixon 2000).

This species formerly was included in the genus SYRRHOPHUS, which was treated as a subgenus of the genus ELEUTHERODACTYLUS by Hedges (1989). Joglar (1989) questioned the separation of the genera SYRRHOPHUS and TOMODACTYLUS.

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