Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and southward in extreme southern Coahuila, central Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Guanajuato and Querétaro, Mexico. Its altitudinal range is from 600-2,000m asl.
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: This species is known from the Big Bend region of Texas and southward in extreme southern Coahuila, central Nuevo Leon, San Luis Potosi and Guanajuato, Mexico. M. J. Forstner (in Dixon 2000) suspects that Eleutherodactylus guttilatus from the Big Bend region of western Texas may actually be a variant of E. marnockii.

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Physical Description

Size

Length: 3 cm

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Type Information

Holotype for Eleutherodactylus guttilatus
Catalog Number: USNM 9888
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Sex/Stage: ; Adult
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: Guanajuato, Mexico
  • Holotype: Cope, E. D. 1879. Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc. 18: 264.
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Holotype for Eleutherodactylus guttilatus
Catalog Number: USNM 108594
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Year Collected: 1939
Locality: Galeana, 15 mi W of, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
  • Holotype: Taylor, E. H. 1940. Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 89: 43, plate 1.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs in areas of pine and oak forests. It has been found in springs, canyons, caves, and ravines. It hides under rocks and leaf-litter when inactive and sometimes burrows. It breeds by direct development and lays eggs in moist, sheltered spots on land.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Comments: This species occurs in areas of pine and oak forests at elevations of 600-2,000 m. It has been found in springs, canyons, caves, and ravines. It hides under rocks and leaf litter when inactive and sometimes burrows. It is direct developing and lays eggs in moist, sheltered spots on land.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Comments: Eats insects, spiders, and small crustaceans.

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Comments: Active in evening and at night, and diurnally during cool wet weather.

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Reproduction

Lays clutch of fewer than 15 eggs in late winter or spring. Larval stage is passed in egg.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Georgina Santos-Barrera, Luis Canseco-Márquez, Geoffrey Hammerson

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2004
    Least Concern
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Population

Population
This is not a rare species, although its area of occupancy within its overall range is probably quite small.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Urban sprawl and the transformation of original forests in some localities along its range threaten some populations of this species.
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Comments: Urban sprawl and the transformation of original forests in some localities along its range threaten some populations of this species.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species has never been recorded in a Biosphere reserve or any other protected area. A survey to evaluate the present status of this species in the field is required.
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Wikipedia

Eleutherodactylus guttilatus

The Spotted Chirping Frog (Eleutherodactylus guttilatus) is a species of small Leptodactylid frog native to the United States and Mexico. They are found in moderate elevation ranges of the Sierra Madre Oriental mountain range, from the Davis Mountains in west Texas south to the Mexican states of Coahuila, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Durango and Guanajuato. They are sometimes referred to as the Mexican Cliff Frog. They grow from 0.75 to 1.25 inches in length, and are easily mistaken for other Eleutherodactylus species, with which they share range. This has led to some confusion in its taxonomic classification.

Sources[edit]

  • Jung, Robin E.; Bonine, Kevin E.; Rosenshield, Michèle L.; de la Reza, Andre; Raimondo, Sandra; Droege, Sam (2002). "Evaluation of Canoe Surveys for Anurans along the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park, Texas". Journal of Herpetology 36 (3): 390–397. doi:10.1670/0022-1511(2002)036[0390:EOCSFA]2.0.CO;2. ISSN 0022-1511. 
  • Espino del Castillo, Adriana; Paredes-León, Ricardo; Morales-Malacara, Juan B. (2011). "Presence of intradermal chigger mite Hannemania hylae (Ewing, 1925) (Acari: Leeuwenhoekiidae) in the troglophile frog Eleutherodactylus longipes (Anura: Brachycephalidae) at Los Riscos Cave, Querétaro, Mexico". International Journal of Acarology 37 (5): 427–440. doi:10.1080/01647954.2010.525522. ISSN 0164-7954. 
  • Chad Arment (2004). Herper's Life List: A Field Checklist for the Native and Introduced Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada. Coachwhip Publications. ISBN 1-930585-18-7. 
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: The taxonomic status of Eleutherodactylus in the Big Bend region of western Texas needs further study (see Dixon 2000).

This species formerly was included in the genus SYRRHOPHUS, which was treated as a subgenus of the genus ELEUTHERODACTYLUS by Hedges (1989). Joglar (1989) questioned the separation of the genera SYRRHOPHUS and TOMODACTYLUS.

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