Overview

Comprehensive Description

Brief

Large ceacilian found in Western Ghats
  • Bhatta, Gopalakrishna (March 1998). ""A field guide to the caecilians of the Western Ghats, India"". Journal of Biosciences 23: 73–85.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species is distributed throughout the Western Ghats region in India (Gower et al. 2007). It has been recorded between 250 and 650 m asl.
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Western Ghats
  • Bhatta, Gopalakrishna (March 1998). ""A field guide to the caecilians of the Western Ghats, India"". Journal of Biosciences 23: 73–85.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The adults are subterranean and possibly partially aquatic, and are associated with the humus and decaying wood substrate of tropical wet evergreen forests, although they are also known to occur in several different disturbed and agricultural habitats (Vyas 2004; Gower et al. 2007 and references therein), such as teak plantations and garbage pits. It is oviparous with terrestrial eggs and aquatic larvae. A female from Koyana was found in a burrow near a rivulet with wet soil with an egg cluster containing 144 eggs. Once hatched the larvae move to water (Jadhav et al. 2007).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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General Habitat

"Fossorial species feeds on termites, insects and earthworms"
  • Bhatta, Gopalakrishna (March 1998). ""A field guide to the caecilians of the Western Ghats, India"". Journal of Biosciences 23: 73–85.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2011

Assessor/s
IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group

Reviewer/s
Hillers, A. & Diesmos, A.C.

Contributor/s
Angulo, A., Gower, D.J., Bhatta, G., Measey, J., Wilkinson, M., Oommen, O. & Dutta, S.

Justification
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Population

Population
There is little direct information regarding its population status.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Severe habitat destruction is a localized threat to some subpopulations of this species, but in view of the species' apparent adaptability to modified habitats and its large range it is thought that it does not affect the species as a whole (Vyas 2003, 2004). Many additional potential threats have been suggested, including the use of agrochemicals, changes in soil chemistry, collection of humus by local people, and adult mortality on roads. All of these require further investigation, and cannot be confirmed as being significant threats at present.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It has been recorded from Vansda National Park and Purna Wildlife Sanctuary, both in Gujarat, Kudremukh National Park in Karnataka, and Periyar Tiger Reserve in Kerala. Further research is required to determine its population status and to assess the potential impact of the different threat factors observed in its areas of occurrence.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Risks

Risk Statement

Least Concern
  • Bhatta, Gopalakrishna (March 1998). ""A field guide to the caecilians of the Western Ghats, India"". Journal of Biosciences 23: 73–85.
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Wikipedia

Bombay caecilian

The Bombay caecilian, Ichthyophis bombayensis, is an amphibian found in India. This rather large species is found in northern Western Ghats. The eyes are distinct and surrounded by a light ring. The tentacle is placed closer to the lip than the eye. A dark brown or greyish-brown species, it has no lateral stripes.[1]

The three names below are presently considered to be junior synonyms of I. bombayensis, as it was recently shown that all the unstriped, long-tailed Ichthyophis from Western Ghats showed little genetic variation.[2]

  • I. malabarensis - southern Western Ghats, known with certainty only from the type locality
  • I. peninsularis - known only from the type specimen, exact locality not known
  • I. subterrestris - known only from the type specimen, from Western Ghats south of Palghat gap (Cochin and Travancore areas)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bhatta, Gopalakrishna (March 1998). "A field guide to the caecilians of the Western Ghats, India". Journal of Biosciences 23: 73–85. doi:10.1007/BF02728526. 
  2. ^ Gower, D. J.; M. Dharne, G. Bhatta, V. Giri, R. Vyas, V. Govindappa, O. V. Oommen, J. George, Y. Shouche & M. Wilkinson (21 March 2007). "Remarkable genetic homogeneity in unstriped, long-tailed Ichthyophis along 1500 km of the Western Ghats, India". Journal of Zoology 272 (3): 266–275. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.2006.00266.x. 
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Ichthyophis subterrestris

Ichthyophis subterrestris is a species of caecilian found in the Western Ghats of India. It was described by Edward Harrison Taylor in 1960.[1] It may be synonymous to I. bombayensis.

References

  1. ^ Edward H. Taylor (1960). ""On the Caecilian Species Ichthyophis glutinosus and Ichthtjophis inonochroiis, with Description of Related Species" 40 (4). pp. 37–130.  ref. on page 65-67.


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Ichthyophis malabarensis

The Malabar caecilian, Ichthyophis malabarensis, is a species of caecilian found in India. It was described by Edward Harrison Taylor in 1960.[1]

References

  1. ^ Edward H. Taylor (1960). ""On the Caecilian Species Ichthyophis glutinosus and Ichthyophis inonochroiis, with Description of Related Species" 40 (4). pp. 37–130.  ref. on page 81-84.


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Ichthyophis peninsularis

Ichthyophis peninsularis is a species of caecilian found in India. It was described by Edward Harrison Taylor in 1960.[1]

References

  1. ^ Edward H. Taylor (1960). ""On the Caecilian Species Ichthyophis glutinosus and Ichthtjophis inonochroiis, with Description of Related Species" 40 (4). pp. 37–130.  ref. on page 61-65.


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