Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, Paraguay, N Argentina (Simmons 2005). Distribution for Bolivia included from Williams (2002).
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Geographic Range

Individuals of E. dabbenei have been found in Columbia (Magdalena River Valley), northern Venezuela, central Paraguay, and northern Argentina (Chaco Province).

These bats tend to be rare throughout their range, and they are poorly known relative to most other Eumops species. (Nowak 1999; Harrison et al. 1979)

Biogeographic Regions: neotropical (Native )

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Large ears connected across the head at their base. Ears are smaller than in the related species, and members of this species have a pointed tragus. The skull is massive, with shallower basisphenoid pits than E. perotis. A large gular (throat) sac is present in males, which swells during mating season. The lamboid crests are strongly developed, while the sagittal crest is less developed. The thumb pad is triangular. The lips are smooth and the tail is quite thick. The dental formula is 1/2, 1/1, 2/2, 3/3 = 30. The dorsal coloration is chestnut, with a paler ventral coloration.

This species is large compared to most members of Eumops, a fact which causes it to become confused with E. perotis. The pointed ears mentioned above are an important distinguising feature.

(Barquez et al. 1993; Novak 1999)

Average mass: 76 g.

Average length: 165 mm.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
E. dabbenei tends to roost in the holes of trees and in buildings in Neotropic areas (Barquez et al. 1993; Novak 1999; Fioramonti 2001). Iti is insectivorous (Barquez et al. 1993). Found in savannas and dry forests (Barquez 1999). Found in low altitudes (Barquez 1999).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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E. dabbenei tends to roost in the holes of trees and in buildings in neotropic areas. The areas of Columbia, Venezuela, Paraguay, and Argentina where they are found tend to be forested, but the full range of habitats available to E. dabbenei is poorly understood.

(Barquez et al. 1993; Novak 1999; Fioramonti 2001)

Habitat Regions: tropical

Terrestrial Biomes: forest ; rainforest ; scrub forest

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Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

These bats feed by catching insects in flight; this behavior is known as "aerial insectivory". There is evidence that fat metabolism is of primary importance to this species, as opposed to protein or carbohydrate metabolism.

 (Findley 1993)

Animal Foods: insects

Primary Diet: carnivore (Insectivore )

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Associations

Ecosystem Roles

This species is a secondary or tertiary consumer, meaning that it eats either herbivores or carnivores that prey on herbivores; these prey item are primarily airborne insects. (Findley 1993)

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Known prey organisms

Eumops dabbenei preys on:
Insecta

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

The reproductive and social behavior of this species has not been examined.

Like some other members of the Eumops genus, E. dabbenei males have a throat sac that swells with a phermone-laden musk during the breeding season. Females tend to have one litter per year, although it is possible for them to have two. (Novak 1999; Hill & Smith 1984)

Average number of offspring: 1.

Key Reproductive Features: seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual ; fertilization (Internal ); viviparous

Parental Investment: altricial

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Barquez, R. & Diaz, M.

Reviewer/s
Medellín, R. (Chiroptera Red List Authority) & Schipper, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Least Concern in because of its wide distribution.
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The abundance of this species is poorly understood, but is believed to be rare throughout its range. It does not have specially protected status at this time (Barquez et al. 1993).

US Migratory Bird Act: no special status

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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Population

Population
E. dabbenei is a species poorly known relative to most other Eumops species. (Nowak 1999). It is a rare species (Barquez pers. comm.).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Taxonomic revision and improve details in species distribution.
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Wikipedia

Big bonneted bat

The Big Bonneted Bat (Eumops dabbenei) is a species of bat in the family Molossidae. It is found in Argentina, Colombia, Paraguay, and Venezuela.

References


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