Overview

Brief Summary

Introduction

Until 1975, the large Chacoan peccary, Catagonus wagneri, was known only from a fossil specimen and was thought to be extinct.But during explorations in the remote Chaco dry forest in Paraguay, the peccary was found alive.The Chacoan peccary has special adaptations for the dry conditions of the Chaco, including:
  • large nasal sinuses to prevent dust inhalation
  • delicate, slim legs for easier access through dense and often prickly, stunted forest
Catagonus wagneri is considered an endangered species and is disappearing at an alarming rate due to human encroachment, over-hunting and introduced diseases.
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Biology

The Chacoan peccaryis active during the day, when it feeds on cacti, fruit, roots and herbs (4). It uses its tough leathery snout to roll cacti on the ground, rubbing the spines off, and may even pull the spines off with its teeth and spit them out (5). To obtain essential minerals like calcium and magnesium this species licks and eats mineral-rich soil from naturally occurring salt licks and leaf-cutter ant mounds (4) (5). Chacoan peccaries maintain territories, using scent glands on the back to mark home ranges which may measure up to 1,100 hectares in size, but with smaller care areas of about 600 ha (4). They live in small stable groups of 2 - 10 individuals, with most groups consisting of four to five adults and accompanying juveniles (4). These animals are social and communicate by various sounds from grunting to chatters of the teeth (5). Females produce their first litters at a minimum age of two years, and have one litter per year with a mean litter size of one to four young. The offspring are well developed and able to run a few hours after birth. Individuals are thought to live for up to nine years (4).
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Description

The Chacoan peccary was first described from subfossil remains collected in the 1930's, but was not recognised as a living species until 1975, making it one of the most recently discovered large mammals (4). It is the largest of the three species of peccary, and has many pig-like features. It is an ungulate with brownish grey bristle-like fur, a dark stripe running across the back, and white fur on the shoulders (5). This species differs from other peccaries by having longer ears, tail and snout, and has white hairs around the mouth. It also possesses a third hind toe, while other peccaries only have two hind toes (5). Males and females are similar in appearance (4).
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Comprehensive Description

Biology

Biology
Chacoan peccaries wander over large areas in search of food, but each herd is generally restricted to its home range. It uses scent markings to delimit its territory.Up to 2 young are born between September and December to coincide with the short rainy season.The Chacoan peccary was thought to be the largest living peccary, but another new and even larger species, Pecari maximus, has now been described from live individuals in Brazil.The Chacoan peccary is brown to blackish grey, with a dark stripe along its back and white markings on it shoulders.It differs from other peccaries as it has:
  • longer ears, snout and tail
  • a third toe on the hind foot - all other peccary species have 2


Behaviour
Chacoan peccaries are vocal animals and keep in contact with one another using a broad range of grunts and teeth chattering.This is important for these social animals as they inhabit dense undergrowth where visibility is reduced.As defence, they often form a protective wall of bodies facing any adversary - this makes them particularly vulnerable to human hunters.
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Distribution

Range Description

The Chacoan peccary is endemic to the dry Chaco of western Paraguay, south-eastern Bolivia and northern Argentina (Redford and Eisenberg 1992; Sowls 1984; Taber 1993). It has a total geographical range of approximately 140,000 km² (Sowls 1984). In Paraguay, the species formerly occurred in all departments of the Chaco. In Argentina, Chacoan peccaries occurs in Chaco, Formosa, Salta and Santiago del Estero Provinces. C. wagneri persists in the Bolivian dry Chaco in the departments of Chuquisaca, Santa Cruz, and Tarija (Maffei et al., submitted)
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Geographic Range

Catagonus wagneri, more commonly known as the Chacoan peccary, is endemic to the South American countries of Paraguay, Bolivia, and Southern Brazil (McDonald Website).

Biogeographic Regions: neotropical (Native )

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Range

Chacoan peccaries are patchily distributed over a total known range of approximately 140,000 km², in central South America, extending from western Paraguay and south-eastern Bolivia to northern Argentina (4).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

The largest of the three species of peccary, Catagonus wagneri has many "pig-like" features (Nova Website). The Chacoan peccary is an ungulate possessing a well-formed rostrum with a tough, leathery snout. The bristle-like fur is generally brown to almost gray. A dark stripe runs across the back, and white fur is found on the shoulders. C. wagneri differs from the its fellow peccary species by having longer ears, snout, and tail. It has white hairs around the mouth, unlike other peccaries. Catagonus wagneri also possesses a third hind toe, while other peccaries only have two (Mayer et al. 1986). The hypsodont teeth follow this dental formula: 2/3, 1/1, 3/3, 3/3 (GeoZoo Website). The upper canines also display the distinguishing trait of peccaries, pointing downwards instead of out and up like other Suiformes (GeoZoo Website).

Range mass: 29 to 49 kg.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; homoiothermic; bilateral symmetry

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The Chacoan peccary occurs in areas of low rainfall and high temperature and is restricted to the driest parts of the Gran Chaco biome (Sowls 1984, 1997). The prime habitat for the species is xerophytic thorn forest characterized by emergent trees, such as Schinopsis lorentzii and Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco; a dense shrub layer including Ruprechtia triflora, Caparis sp. and Acacia sp.; and a ground cover of bromeliads and cactii, such as Opuntia sp., Cleistocactus baumannii and Eriocereus guelichii (Mayer and Brandt 1982). Chacoan peccaries are also found at lower density in open woodland, characterized by trees such as Tabebuia caraiba and Schinopsis balansae (Taber et al. 1993). Cactii, including Cleistocactus, Eriocereus, Quiabentia and at least two species of Opuntia, constitute the principal food of Chacoan peccaries. They also forage on the roots of bromeliads, fruit from various species of Acacia and Prosopis, and occasionally browse on forbs (Mayer and Brandt 1982; Taber et al. 1993). Chacoan peccaries lick and eat mineral rich soil from naturally occurring salt licks and leaf-cutter ant mounds. They also consume carrion on occasion and may even prey on small mammals.

Like the collared peccary, they are territorial and their home range sizes, based on convex polygons, measure about 1,100 ha and contain a core area of about 600 ha in the Paraguayan Chaco (Taber et al. 1993). Density estimates vary from less than 1 individual/km² to as high as 9.2 individuals/km² (Mayer and Brandt, 1982). A study in the Paraguayan Chaco produced a density estimate of 0.43 individuals/ km² (1.1 individuals/sq mi) (Taber 1991). In the Argentine Chaco the density varied between 0.17 individuals/ km² in hunted sites to 0.44 individuals/ km² in non-hunted sites (Altrichter 2005).

Chacoan peccaries are diurnal and become active about sunrise, are active throughout the day and become inactive at dusk (Taber 1991). Reports of herd sizes in the Paraguayan Chaco vary between one and nine (Mayer and Brandt, 1982; Sowls, 1997), with an average of 4.5 (Taber et al. 1993). However, in hunted areas, average group sizes are smaller ranging from 1 to 4 (Taber et al. 1993, Mayer and Brandt 1982, Altrichter and Boaglio 2004).

A slightly biased sex ratio in favour of males has been reported by Mayer and Brandt (1982) and Sowls (1984). Captive females in Paraguay (Proyecto Taguá, San Diego Zoo) gave birth between 1.2 and 8.3 years of age; younger females (<3 years old) usually had smaller litters than older females. They have one litter a year. Litter sizes in Paraguay have been reported to vary between one and four with averages of 2.72 (Mayer and Brandt, 1982; Brooks, 1992; Yahnke et al., 1997). Taber et al. (1993) estimated litter size of 1.7 for a wild population and presumed that this small litter size resulted from low reproductive rate or high neonate mortality. The farrowing season extends from September through January. Maximum longevity is unknown, but Sowls (1984) estimated the age of some individuals, based on tooth cementum layers, as at least nine years. In captivity, animals have reached 10 years and 6 months. Gestation time in captivity has been found to be 151 days (Proyecto Tagua, San Diego Zoo).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Chacoan peccaries have received the nickname "pigs from green hell" because of their wild, inpenetrable habitats. The Chacoan peccary is truly confined to hot, dry areas inpenetrable and untouched by humans (Cohn 1996). Dominated by low-lying succulents and thorny bushes, the Gran Chaco is approximately 140,000 square kilometers. There are a few scattered giant trees, but the majority of the vegetation is thorny scrub vegetation (Sowls 1997). Catagonus have developed adaptations like well-developed sinuses to combat dry, dusty conditions (Mayer et al. 1986). The feet are also small, which allows maneuverability among spiny plants (Cohn 1996).

Terrestrial Biomes: scrub forest

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Inhabits the enormous flat plain of the Gran Chaco, which is characterised by semi-arid thorn forests, savannah plains and marshes are found, and where temperatures are high and rainfall is low (4).
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Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

The arid habitat of the Gran Chaco region provides very tough vegetation for C. wagneri. These peccaries feed on various species of cacti (Cohn 1996), species like Cleistocactus baumannii and Opuntia discolor. C. wagneri uses its tough snout to roll the cacti on the ground, rubbing the spines off. The Chacoan peccary may pull off the spines with its teeth and spit them out. The kidneys of Catagonus wagneri are specialized to break down acids from the cacti. The two-chambered stomachs are also well suited to digest tough foods like cacti (Cohn 1996). Occassionally grazing on bromeliad roots, C. wagneri also eats acacia pods and fallen cacti flowers. This species of peccary seeks out salt licks formed from ant mounds and construction projects like road building and land clearings. The Chacoan peccary gains essential minerals like calcium, magnesium, and chlorine from the salt licks (Sowls 1997).

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General Ecology

Distribution ecology

The Chacoan peccary is found in the dry Chaco region, which covers about 140,000 square kilometres, incorporating part of Paraguay, Bolivia and northern Argentina.It is a cactus-eating specialist and is found in impenetrable dry forest.It lives in herds of up to 10 animals and the world population is estimated at 3,000.
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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan/Longevity

Average lifespan

Status: captivity:
1.0 years.

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Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Observations: Not much is known about the longevity of these animals. One captive specimen was still living at 14.7 years of age (Richard Weigl 2005).
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Reproduction

Young are generally born between the months of September to December, but litters have been found almost year-round (Mayer et al. 1986). Births have been linked to periods of food abundance and rainfall (Sowls 1997). The average number of embryos has been recorded as approximately 2.72 (Mayer etal. 1986). Females may leave the herd to give birth and then return afterwards. Newborns are precocial, able to run a few hours after birth (Sowls 1997). The pelage of the young resembles that of the adults (Schmidt 1990). There is no sexual dimorphism (Mayer et al. 1986).

Average birth mass: 610 g.

Average number of offspring: 2.4.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female)

Sex: female:
1096 days.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
A3cd+4cd

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Altrichter, M., Taber, A., Noss, A. & Maffei, L.

Reviewer/s
Leus, K. & Oliver, W. ( Pig, Peccary & Hippo Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Endangered because of a serious population decline, estimated to be more than 50% over three generations in the present and the future, inferred from observed shrinkage in available habitat, and from over-hunting.

History
  • 1996
    Endangered
  • 1994
    Endangered
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Vulnerable
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Vulnerable
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
  • 1986
    Vulnerable
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)
  • 1982
    Vulnerable
    (Thornback and Jenkins 1982)
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Because the Chacoan peccary is endemic to a formerly isolated region of South America, it is most vulnerable to human activity. Just as quickly as this species is discovered in an area, it disappears (Sowls 1997). Herd numbers are decreasing as a result of habitat loss and fragmentation (IUCN 1993). The range of the Chacoan peccary is being quickly tranformed into large Texas-style ranches. Hunting also continues as well as an unidentified disease that has plagued the herds in recent years (Sowls 1997). Efforts are underway to breed Chacoan peccaries in captivity, but the species does not survive well outside of the wild. Preserves have also been established in Paraguay, but are not highly enforced (IUCN 1993).

CITES: appendix i

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: endangered

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Conservation

The Chaco region is being opened up for farming and ranching, and as a result the Chacoan peccary is not only losing its habitat, but is also becoming more vulnerable to hunting.Diseases from domestic pigs are also having a marked effect on numbers. The peccary does not breed well in captivity and although some efforts have been made to segregate areas where the peccary still exists, such as national parks, they are poorly protected.
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Status

Classified as Endangered (EN A1acde, B1+2bde, E) on the IUCN Red List 2004 (1), and listed on Appendix I of CITES (3).
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Population

Population
Populations are fragmented within its limited geographical range and numbers of Chacoan peccary are declining. The species has disappeared from large areas of the Argentine Chaco where its original range has been reduced by approximately 40% (Altrichter and Boaglio 2004, Altrichter 2006). Its range has also been reduced in Bolivia (Maffei pers. comm.) and in the eastern Paraguayan Chaco (Neris et al. 2002). The total population size is unknown, but probably several thousand persist in the dry Chaco of Argentina and Bolivia and an estimated 5,000 individuals were estimated to survive in Paraguay in the early 1990’s (Taber 1993). Using estimates of density and remaining habitat for Catagonus in Argentina, M. Altricher (pers. comm.) estimated a population of 3,200 individuals in 2002. This was before the massive deforestation of the region for soy bean and cattle ranching started in 2003. In a recent study conducted in the Argentine Chaco, Altrichter and Boaglio (2004) found Chacoan peccary to be the rarest of the three species found in the area as well as being probably the most vulnerable to human disturbance.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
The decline in the range and numbers of Chacoan peccaries is probably due to a combination of factors. These factors include hunting by humans, habitat destruction, and disease with predation by large felids also a contributor (Taber 1989, 1991, 1993, Altrichter and Boaglio 2004, Altrichter 2005). Of these, hunting pressure undoubtedly has the most negative impact on these animals. All peccary species in the Chaco in all three countries are vigorously hunted wherever they occur, even in national parks and reserve areas. Sowls (1984, 1997) has stated that the Chacoan peccary constituted one of the most important sources of bush meat in the areas where they were previously abundant. Chacoan peccary hides are thinner and much less valuable than those of the other peccary species. Fur buyers in Paraguay in 1988, for example, purchased Catagonus skins from settlers for about US$0.5 each compared to about US$8.0 for those of Pecari tajacu and US$5.0 for Tayassu pecari (Taber 1991). However, they still have been hunted and traded commercially. Habitat destruction is a major threat to this species. Although large tracts of intact bush survive, the rate of clearance for agriculture and cattle pasture in the Paraguayan Chaco has been estimated by some authorities as being as much as 1,500 km² annually (Sanjuro pers. comm.). A study in the Argentine Chaco found that Chacoan peccaries disappear when forest cover is reduced to less than 87% of the original cover (Altrichter and Boaglio 2004).

Estimated rates of decline are given below:

Argentina: 1972 to 2001, 588,900 ha (c. 20% of the forests) was deforested at a rate of 2.2% a year. Assuming this rate has continued, and will continue, this implies a 40% habitat loss over a given 18 year period (3 Catagonus generations). However, these total deforestation rates hide the impact of habitat degradation, which impacts virtually the whole area. Also, there are good reasons to believe that deforestation has greatly accelerated in the Argentine Chaco. The ongoing soy /commodity boom is having major impacts: e.g., over the last 10 years in the Chaco and Santiago del Estero provinces, soy cropland has grown from 284,000 ha to 1,513,000 ha. Some of this replaced smaller scale cotton cultivation, but most of this is new agro industrial expansions. This is putting tremendous pressure on remaining forest habitat.

Paraguay: One source reported that 45% of the dry forest was cut or selectively degraded by 1990. Since that time, approximately half of the area that had the largest Catagonus population existed in 1990 has now gone (A. Taber pers. comm.). The pressures of the habitat are not abating, and are probably increasing, particularly in the prime Catagonus habitat in Central Chaco (A. Taber pers. comm.). The species probably only hangs on in the fringes of this area, as the far west is too dry for the species, and the east too wet. Proposals for major irrigation schemes from the Paraguay River which would further expand deforestation in the Central Chaco, and allow limited expansion to areas further west, are being discussed. Also, dryland-adapted transgenic crops (especially soy bean) are allowing more land to be put under extensive agriculture, further encroaching on the species in its prime habitat.

Bolivia: This situation is less clear in this country. The Kaa-Iya National Park in the north of the range probably stabilises the situation there. It is suspected that the conditions in the dry Chaco in Chuquisaca and Tarija are likely to be similar to those in the Argentine Chaco with increasingly extensive agriculture.

Based on the above observations, it is believed that an estimated present and future 50% loss of Chacoan peccary habitat over a three-generation time period (18 years) is defensible. Also, hunting pressures have probably not abated, further increasing the likelihood of such a rate of decline.
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The recent decline in the range and numbers of this species is due to a number of factors, including hunting for meat, habitat destruction, disease and predation by larger felids like jaguars (Panthera onca) (4). All species of peccary in the Gran Chaco are hunted for their meat by local people, even in the national parks. This species is particularly susceptible as they frequently dust bathe in groups in open spaces, including on roads, and often react to danger by standing their ground rather than fleeing. This behaviour enables hunters to eliminate whole groups in one encounter (4). Furthermore, habitat destruction is a major threat to this species. In the Paraguayan Chaco area the rate of forest clearance for agriculture and cattle pastures has been estimated as 1,500 km² per year. Without vegetation cover, this species has no shelter from predation and hunting, and no food to eat (5). In Argentina and Bolivia much of the land is overgrazed by livestock and degraded by fire. However, Chacoan peccaries seem to be able to adapt to this degraded habitat as long as some food and shelter is available (4). In the late 1970s and 1980s there were reports of large groups of Chacoan peccaries dying from diseases. The nature of the diseases remains unknown though foot-and-mouth and bovine rabies were common in the region at this time amongst livestock (4).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is included on Appendix I of CITES. Hunting of all wildlife in Paraguay is officially prohibited. The species is also officially protected in Argentina, where its exportation, interprovincial traffic and commercial exploitation is illegal. Even so, the Chacoan peccary is heavily hunted for its meat everywhere it occurs and existing regulations prohibiting its hunting are ignored and unenforced (Taber 1993, Altrichter 2005). There are only two national parks within this species' range in Paraguay, the Defensores del Chaco (7,800 km²) and Teniente Enciso (400 km²). In Bolivia this species occurs in and around the huge Kaa-Iya del Gran Chaco National Park and Integrated Management Area (34,400 km²). In Argentina, the only protected areas containing Chacoan peccaries are Copo National Park (1,140 km²), in Santiago del Estero province, and other small provincial reserves.

The species has proved difficult to establish in captivity. In 1985, the Chacoan peccary was adopted for a Species Survival Plan (SSP) under the aegis of the Conservation Management Committee of the American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums. The following year, a captive breeding station was established at Estancia Toledo, near Filadelfia, in the central Paraguayan Chaco, with funding from the Foundation for Endangered Animals, the Zoological Society of San Diego, and the Lincoln Park Zoo. Of the total of 44 wild caught adult and juvenile animals obtained for 'Proyecto Tagua' 31 died in captivity (Byrd et al. 1988; Benirschke et al. 1990; Unger 1992; Brooks pers. comm.). However, by 1992 the herd had grown to 44 animals the majority of which were born in captivity. In 1996 a mixed group of 10 animals were imported into the United States from the Paraguayan colony.

Priority conservation actions recommended for this species are: upgrade and expand the existing protected areas system within the dry Chaco of Paraguay, Argentina and Bolivia; expand the private reserve system in the Chaco; establish an effective hunting ban on the species; develop an environmental education program; strengthen wildlife services in all three Chaco countries; improve and extend captive breeding initiatives; assess the feasibility of translocating wild caught peccaries into the national parks or other reserves from areas where the natural habitat is being destroyed; and conduct further research on various aspects of the Chacoan peccary's reproductive biology, behavior, ecology, range wide status, and future management needs both in the wild and in captivity (Taber 1993).
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Conservation

Hunting of all wildlife in Paraguay is officially prohibited and its exportation in Argentina is illegal. However, such regulations seem to be ignored and un-enforced, as hunting of the Chacoan peccary exists across its range. In 1990 a conservation action plan for this species was submitted to the Paraguayan Government, and in 1991 a similar plan was given to relevant authorities in Bolivia and Argentina (4).
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Importance for Humans: Negative

There have been no reports of the Chacoan peccary adversely affecting humans. This is probably due to the isolated, wild habitats of the species (Sowls 1997).

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Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

Historically, the "spirit masters of the forest" have been hunted by local peoples, providing a plentiful and reliable source of protein. Even today, Catagonus wagneri provides meat for both local people and developers (Cohn 1996). The meat of the Chacoan peccary has been known to be "quite tasty". Catagonus wagneri possesses thinner skin than that of its relatives, and was never widely hunted for its hide (Sowls 1997).

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Wikipedia

Chacoan peccary

The Chacoan peccary or tagua (Catagonus wagneri) is a species of peccary found in the Gran Chaco of Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina. About 3000 exist in the world. It is believed to be the closest living relative to the extinct genus Platygonus.

The Chacoan peccary has the unusual distinction of having been first described in 1930 based on fossils and was originally thought to be an extinct species. In 1971, the animal was discovered to still be alive in the Chaco region, in the Argentine province of Salta. The species was well known to the native people, but it took a while for scientists to rediscover its existence. It is known locally as the tagua.

Habitat[edit]

The Chacoan peccary is confined to hot, dry areas. Dominated by low-lying succulents and thorny bushes, the Gran Chaco is about 140,000 km2. A few scattered giant trees are found, but the majority of the vegetation is thorny scrub vegetation. The Chacoan peccary has developed adaptations such as well-developed sinuses to combat dry, dusty conditions. Their feet are also small, which allows maneuverability among spiny plants.

Physical characteristics[edit]

The largest of the three generally accepted species of peccaries, the Chacoan peccary has many pig-like features. It is an ungulate with a well-formed rostrum with a tough leathery snout. The bristle-like hair is generally brown to almost gray. A dark stripe runs across the back, and white fur is on the shoulders. Chacoan peccaries differ from other peccary species by having longer ears, snouts, and tails. It has white hairs around the mouth, unlike other peccaries. Catagonus wagneri also has a third hind toe, but other peccaries only have two. The hypsodont teeth follow this dental formula: 2/3, 1/1, 3/3, 3/3 . The upper canines display the distinguishing trait of peccaries, pointing downwards instead of out and up like other Suiformes. When the Chacoan peccary is nervous or frightened, it flees, and raises the hairs on its back. While escaping, it sprays secretions from its dorsal glands, which may be a signal for other peccaries to keep the group together through the dense bush.[2]

Reproduction[edit]

Young are generally born between September and December, but litters have been found almost year-round. Births have been linked to periods of food abundance and rainfall. The average number of embryos has been recorded as approximately 2.72. Females may leave the herd to give birth and then return afterwards. Newborns are precocial, able to run a few hours after birth. The pelage of the young resembles that of the adults. There is no sexual dimorphism.

Behavior[edit]

Chacoan peccaries often travel in herds of up to 20 individuals. They are active during the day, especially in the morning when they are most apt to travel. Herds display a general travel cycle within their home range of 42 days. This allows the individuals to monitor and show ownership over their areas.

These social mammals communicate by various sounds, ranging from grunts to chatters of the teeth. Though individuals may occasionally exhibit aggressive behavior such as charging and biting, this species is not as aggressive as others.

As a defensive strategy, members of a herd may line up in a defensive wall; this makes the herds easy targets for hunters. The Chacoan peccary produces a milky, odorous substance used for marking trees, shrubs, and similar. The substance is secreted from glands located on their backs, and is dispersed by rubbing. Frequently bathing in mud or dust, Chacoan peccaries also defecate at particular "stations".

Chacoan peccary at St Louis Zoo

Food habits[edit]

The arid habitat of the Gran Chaco region provides very tough vegetation for the Chacoan peccary. These peccaries feed on various species of cacti, such as Cleistocactus baumannii and Opuntia discolor. It uses its tough snout to roll the cacti on the ground, rubbing the spines off. It may pull off the spines with its teeth and spit them out. The kidneys are specialized to break down acids from the cacti. The two-chambered stomachs are also well suited to digest tough foods. Occasionally grazing on bromeliad roots, it also eats acacia pods and fallen cactus flowers. This species of peccary seeks out salt licks formed from ant mounds and construction projects (road building and land clearings). The Chacoan peccary gains essential minerals like calcium, magnesium, and chlorine from the salt licks.

Conservation status[edit]

Because the Chacoan peccary is endemic to a formerly isolated region of South America, it is most vulnerable to human activity. Just as quickly as this species is discovered in an area, it disappears. Herd numbers are decreasing as a result of habitat loss and fragmentation. Their range is being quickly transformed into large Texas-style ranches. Hunting also continues, as well as an unidentified disease that has plagued the herds in recent years. Efforts are underway to breed Chacoan peccaries in captivity, but the species does not survive well outside of the wild. Preserves have also been established in Paraguay, but are not highly enforced.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Altrichter, M.; Taber, A.; Noss, A.; Maffei, L. (2008). "Catagonus wagneri". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Archived from the original on 22 November 1911. 
  2. ^ Catagonus wagneri - Chacoan peccary
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