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Overview

Brief Summary

Description

"Underwood's mastiff bats have been seen roosting in hollow trees and under palm fronds, and have been captured in mist nets over pools of water in the desert, but little is known about their daytime roosting habits or about their winter range. This bat's large mouth and strong jaws suggest that it may include hard insects such as beetles and grasshoppers in its diet, and its long, narrow wings and the bones and muscles of its shoulders suggest that it may be able to fly all night, without resting, as it hunts. It has been clocked at 43 km per hour and can probably fly faster than that."

Links:
Mammal Species of the World
Click here for The American Society of Mammalogists species account
  • Original description: Goodwin, G.G., 1940.  Three new bats from Honduras and the first record of Enchisthenes harti (Thomas) for North America, p. 2.  American Museum Novitates, 1075:1-3.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs from Arizona (USA) to Nicaragua (Simmons, 2005). It occurs from lowlands to 1,300 m (Reid, 1997). There are registers for Costa Rica (Pineda pers. comm.).
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: Southern Arizona south through western mainland of Mexico to Nicaragua. In the U.S., known from only 4 sites in vicinity of Baboquivari Mountains, Pima County, Arizona (apparently common there, but day roost site unknown). Specimen from near Sun City, Maricopa County, Arizona, sometimes referred to this species, is actually Perotis (Hoffmeister 1986). Winter distribution and precise limits of range are unknown.

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Physical Description

Size

Length: 17 cm

Weight: 61 grams

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Size in North America

Length:
Range: 160-165 mm

Weight:
Range: 40-65 g
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species can be found usually in dry forest and arid regions, sometimes in semideciduous forest (Reid, 1997). Its biology is poorly known. It has been caught over ponds or watering holes in deserts. In Arizona, single young are born in June or July (Barbour and Davis, 1969). It is a fast, high-flying bat that captures large insects, including large (up to 60 mm) beetles and grasshoppers. Mainly in arid and dry forest regions, but also from areas where moist forest occurs. Flight speed reported at least 43 km/h, but is probably an underestimate. (LaVal and Rodriguez-H, 2002). Found in pine-oak forests in Mexico (Iniguenz, 2005)

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Comments: In Mexico, found in arid lowlands. Roost sites in U.S. are not known. Most productive collecting site in Arizona is a pond in mesquite desert at 4,000 ft, 6 miles from the nearest low mountain range (Barbour and Davis 1969).

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Comments: Insectivorous.

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

Apparently one young is born in late June or July.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Eumops underwoodi

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Miller, B., Reid, F., Arroyo-Cabrales, J., Cuarón, A.D. & de Grammont, P.C.

Reviewer/s
Medellín, R. (Chiroptera Red List Authority) & Schipper, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining at nearly the rate required to qualify for listing in a threatened category.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Status

Near Threatened.
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Population

Population
It is uncommon to rare (Reid, 1997). The southern populations (in Central America) are poorly known and limited; the northern populations (in USA) are locally common and but limited (Wilson and Ruff, 1999).The species is rarely encountered because it is difficult to capture due to their high flying and roosting behaviors (Emmons and Feer, 1997).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Not known.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Found in protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Underwood's bonneted bat

Underwood's bonneted bat (Eumops underwoodi) is a species of bat in the family Molossidae found in Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua and the southwestern United States.[1]

Underwood's bonneted bat is sandy brown in color. It is a large bat with a wingspan of 20-22 inches, making it the second-largest bat found within the US, after the greater mastiff bat. Its long, narrow wings and the bones and muscles in its shoulder suggest this bat can fly very swiftly, and E. underwoodi possibly flies all through the night. Like many other species in the genus Eumops, it has a free-hanging tail that sticks far out of its tail membrane.

E. underwoodi is known to eat grasshoppers, leafhoppers, moths and beetles. This specie prefers to roost in tree hollows and under palm fronds, far off the ground.[2] It favors dry roosting sites. This bat's winter habits are poorly known. In northern parts of its range, it may migrate south for winter. One pup is born in June or July.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Miller, B., Reid, F., Arroyo-Cabrales, J., Cuarón, A.D. & de Grammont, P.C. (2008). "Eumops underwoodi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 7 February 2010. 
  2. ^ "North American Mammals Eumops underwoodi" http://www.mnh.si.edu/mna/image_info.cfm?species_id=93


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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: See Eger (1977) for information on the systematics of the genus Eumops. Hall (1981) and Simmons (in Wilson and Reeder 2005) recognized two subspecies (underwoodi and sonoriensis).

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