Eubalaena japonica — Facts & Information

North Pacific Right Whale learn more about names for this taxon

Data about <i>Eubalaena japonica</i>

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Distribution

Data about <i>Eubalaena japonica</i>
  • Latitude
    The geographic latitude (in decimal degrees, using the spatial reference system given in geodeticDatum) of the geographic center of a Location. Positive values are north of the Equator, negative values are south of it. Legal values lie between -90 and 90, inclusive.
    http://rs.tdwg.org/dwc/terms/decimalLatitude
Latitude min
Additional detail 56.97 degrees OBIS Environmental Information  
max Additional detail 56.97 degrees OBIS Environmental Information  
  • Longitude
    The geographic longitude (in decimal degrees, using the spatial reference system given in geodeticDatum) of the geographic center of a Location. Positive values are east of the Greenwich Meridian, negative values are west of it. Legal values lie between -180 and 180, inclusive.
    http://rs.tdwg.org/dwc/terms/decimalLongitude
Longitude min
Additional detail -163 degrees OBIS Environmental Information  
max Additional detail -163 degrees OBIS Environmental Information  

Ecology

Data about <i>Eubalaena japonica</i>
Habitat
Additional detail marine habitat
  • Marine habitat
    A habitat that is in or on a sea or ocean containing high concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids (typically >35 grams dissolved salts per litre).
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000569
IUCN  
Habitat
Additional detail bar
  • Bar
    A linear shoaling landform feature within a body of water. Bars tend to be long and narrow (linear) and develop where a current (or waves) promote deposition of granular material, resulting in localized shallowing (shoaling) of the water. Bars can appear in the sea, in a lake, or in a river. They are typically composed of sand, although could be of any granular matter that the moving water has access to and is capable of shifting around (for example, soil, silt, gravel, cobble, shingle, or even boulders). The grain size of the material comprising a bar is related: to the size of the waves or the strength of the currents moving the material, but the availability of material to be worked by waves and currents is also important.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000167
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail bay Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail biome
  • Biome
    A major class of ecologically similar communities of plants, animals, and other organisms. Biomes are defined based on factors such as plant structures (such as trees, shrubs, and grasses), leaf types (such as broadleaf and needleleaf), plant spacing (forest, woodland, savanna), and other factors like climate. Unlike ecozones, biomes are not defined by genetic, taxonomic, or historical similarities. Biomes are often identified with particular patterns of ecological succession and climax vegetation.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000428
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail coastal water Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail island
  • Island
    Area of dry or relatively dry land surrounded by water or low wetland.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000098
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail marine habitat
  • Marine habitat
    A habitat that is in or on a sea or ocean containing high concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids (typically >35 grams dissolved salts per litre).
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000569
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail pelagic zone Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail peninsula
  • Peninsula
    A body of land jutting out into and nearly surrounded by water.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000305
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail shore
  • Shore
    That part of the land in immediate contact with a body of water including the area between high and low water lines.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000304
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail strait
  • Strait
    A narrow channel of water that connects two larger bodies of water, and thus lies between two land masses.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000394
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail temperate Environments - EOL project  
Water nitrate concentration max
Additional detail 5.98 µmol/L OBIS Environmental Information  
min Additional detail 5.98 µmol/L OBIS Environmental Information  
Water temperature min
Additional detail 4.59 degrees Celsius OBIS Environmental Information  
max Additional detail 4.59 degrees Celsius OBIS Environmental Information  
Water silicate concentration min
Additional detail 19.14 µmol/L OBIS Environmental Information  
max Additional detail 19.14 µmol/L OBIS Environmental Information  
Water phosphate concentration min
Additional detail 1.01 µmol/L OBIS Environmental Information  
max Additional detail 1.01 µmol/L OBIS Environmental Information  
Water dissolved O2 concentration max
Additional detail 7.46 mL/L OBIS Environmental Information  
min Additional detail 7.46 mL/L OBIS Environmental Information  
Water O2 saturation max
Additional detail 101.63 percent OBIS Environmental Information  
min Additional detail 101.63 percent OBIS Environmental Information  
Water salinity max
Additional detail 31.74 PSU OBIS Environmental Information  
min Additional detail 31.74 PSU OBIS Environmental Information  

Conservation

Data about <i>Eubalaena japonica</i>
Iucn red list category
Additional detail endangered
  • Endangered
    A taxon is Endangered when the best available evidence indicates that it meets any of the criteria A to E for Endangered, and it is therefore considered to be facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/endangered
IUCN  
Population trend
Additional detail Unknown IUCN  

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