Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Endemic to the Mediterranean region. The mouse-tailed dormouse is found in Bulgaria and Turkey (both European and Asian Turkey). It may also occur in eastern Greece. It is mainly a lowland species.

This species is found in southeast Bulgaria through Thrace (Kurtonur and Ozkan, 1990) and western Turkey (Storch, 1978). The exact limits are unknown in western Anatolia, where the species is presently known from only three separate localities. The species was first described as a fossil species in 1937, and was only described as an extant species in the late 1940s. Subfossil information from southern Turkey and Israel indicated a larger range over the last few thousand years. The last published records in Bulgaria are from 1985.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It inhabits scrub and semi-open habitats with trees or bushes such as orchards, vineyards, hedgerows in arable land, and river banks. Although it is found in some extensively managed agricultural habitats, it is absent from intensively farmed areas. It is more terrestrial than other dormice, and its diet consists for the most part of seeds.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
B2ab(iii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Kryštufek, B.

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Temple, H. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is found in a restricted range (area of occupancy is <2,000 km²); there are recent records from European Turkey but these were very difficult to collect (involved years of collecting effort). It is known from more than 15 sites and its range is fragmented. The vast majority of potential habitat has converted to agriculture, and the remaining areas are severely fragmented and probably subject to ongoing decline. Consequently it qualifies for Vulnerable (VU B2ab(iii)). More data and a reassessment in a few years are required.

History
  • 1996
    Vulnerable
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Population

Population
Little is known about this restricted-range species. In Turkish Thrace there are only definite records from a small number of sites. Until recently, despite intensive searches, the species was not found at all for at least 5 years (SW Asia workshop 2005). Very recently (within the last three years) there were several specimens collected, but this species remains very difficult to find and collect (B. Krystufek pers. comm. 2007).

Throughout its distribution the vast majority of suitable habitat has been converted to intensive agriculture, and the species' range is severely fragmented and subject to ongoing losses (SW Asia workshop 2005).

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
The range of this species is in decline. In European Turkey, most of its habitat has been transformed by agriculture. In spite of intensive searches the species has not been found over the last five years. It is clear that the range is shrinking.

It is very difficult to determine what is happening with the range because it is the exact habitat preferences are not known. It has been declining since the Pleistocene. Only 50 animals are known in collections. The region in European Turkey and Bulgaria is intensively cultivated, with very little natural habitat remaining.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is listed on Appendices II and III of the Bern Convention. Surveys are needed to determine if and where the species can still be found, and sites where the species is found should be strictly protected. This species is not found in any protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Roach's mouse-tailed dormouse

The Roach's mouse-tailed dormouse or ground dormouse, also known simply as the mouse-tailed dormouse, (Myomimus roachi) is a species of rodent in the Gliridae family. It is found in Bulgaria, Turkey and possibly extreme eastern Greece.

Distribution[edit]

Historically found in Turkey and south-eastern Bulgaria. As oak and walnut trees were removed for agriculture and forestry its distribution became restricted to a few small spinneys in Edirne, north-west Turkey.[1]

Habitat[edit]

Roach's mouse-tailed dormouse lives in scrub and semi-open habitats with trees or bushes such as orchards, vineyards, hedgerows in arable land and river banks. Old trees are essential element in their habitat because it uses hollows of old trees to sleep during the day or rest for a little time at night.

Behavior[edit]

The mouse-tailed dormouse is nocturnal which means that they are active at night. It is active from 1-2 hours before sunset til 1-2 hours after sunrise. The mouse-tailed dormouse is not strictly arboreal, it uses both trees and ground for moving and feeding. It also uses open areas such as grasslands, cereal fields and even recently plowed agricultural land for moving and searching for food, which makes it easier food for predators.The same animal uses few different trees with hollows for resting, and one tree can be used for one or more consecutive days. The same tree hollows are used by different individuals at different time.[2]

Local names[edit]

  • Bulgarian мишевиден сънливец /misheviden sǎnlivets/ (lit. "mouse-like sleeper"), български мишевиден сънливец /bǎlgarski misheviden sǎnlivets/ (lit. "Bulgarian mouse-like sleeper"), български сънливец /bǎlgarski sǎnlivets/ (lit. "Bulgarian sleeper")
  • Greek μυωξός του Roach (lit. "Roach's dormouse")
  • Turkish yer yediuyuru (lit. "ground seven-sleepers"), farebenzeri yediuyur (lit. "mouse-like seven-sleepers"), faremsi uyur (lit. "mouse-like sleeper"), sıçankuyruklu fındıkfaresi (lit. "mouse-tailed hazel-mouse"), boz kakırca (lit. "gray dormouse")

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diker, Halim Yalçın (December 2013). "Remote Revelations". BBC Wildlife: 62–7. 
  2. ^ Yaban Hayat Researches, Halim and Ebru Diker
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