Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known only from a single specimen (collected in 1874) from the Percy Islands, Queensland, Australia, and subsequent non-specimen records of a colony (L. Hall pers. comm.). It is not known from which island the specimen originally came.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
There is little known about the habitat requirements of this species.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EX
Extinct

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Richards, G. & Hall, L.

Reviewer/s
Lamoreux, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team), Racey, P.A., Medellín, R. & Hutson, A.M. (Chiroptera Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Extinct because it has not been found in its only known range, or nearby, much after the original collection date despite extensive surveys.

History
  • 1996
    Extinct
  • 1994
    Extinct?
    (Groombridge 1994)
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Population

Population
This species is known only from the holotype. It was reported as being plentiful at the close of the 19th century (Conder 2008).
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Threats

Major Threats
It is possible that the species declined because of its vulnerability to habitat loss (Conder 2008).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is listed on Appendix II of CITES. Despite extensive surveys so far, further field studies on the Percy Islands and other islands in the region are needed to determine if any remnant populations of this species persist (L. Hall pers. comm.). There is also a need to try to find skeletal remains near old camps, in order to confirm the locality of this specimen (L. Hall pers. comm.). Additional taxonomic work is needed to resolve the status of this species.
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Wikipedia

Dusky flying fox

The dusky flying fox (Pteropus brunneus), also known as the Percy Island flying fox, is an extinct species of flying fox in the Pteropodidae family. It was endemic to Percy Island off the southeast coast of Mackay, Queensland, in the northeast corner of Australia. [2]

Only one specimen is known to exist. It was collected in 1859 and documented by Dobson in 1878. Since that record, no further documentation is known of this species.[3][4] Currently, the specimen is located at the British Museum of Natural History, and was validated as a separate species in the late 20th century.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richards, G. & Hall, L. (2008). Pteropus brunneus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 6 January 2009.
  2. ^ Flying-foxes. Queensland Environmental Protection Agency (2009).
  3. ^ Dusky Flying Fox bats pteropus brunneus classification night vision Queensland percy island species paperbark swamp. Bathouses.com (2012-12-16). Retrieved on 2013-01-01.
  4. ^ Percy Island Flying-fox. Australian Museum. Amonline.net.au. Retrieved on 2013-01-01.
  5. ^ "The Action Plan for Australian Bats". Environment Australia, 1999. Environment.gov.au. Retrieved on 2013-01-01.
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