Overview

Distribution

Range Description

The species is distributed in the Amazon Basin in Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, southern Colombia and northern Bolivia. The limits of the range are poorly know as so few specimens have been described.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The Amazon weasel has been reported mainly from humid riparian forests (Izor and De la Torre, 1978).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Emmons, L. & Helgen, K.

Reviewer/s
Duckworth, J.W. (Small Carnivore Red List Authority) & Schipper, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Least Concern in light of its large range in Amazonian forests, presumed large populations remaining in forested habitat and although it may be declining in portions of its range, not at a rate sufficient to be considered threatened. This species is a candidate for a Data Deficient listing, as almost nothing is known of its ecology, threats and distribution, however, it is suspected to occur over a large area of relatively intact habitat which suggests that it is not currently declining at a rate sufficient to qualify for listing. More research effort is needed to confirm it estimated distribution presence in protected areas and if it can tolerate human disturbance.

History
  • 1996
    Data Deficient
  • 1994
    Indeterminate
    (Groombridge 1994)
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Population

Population
Nothing is known of the populations of this species as it is seldom encountered even where it is known to occur.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Almost nothing is known of the threats to this species, although it could be inferred that habitat conversion of the Amazonian rain forests is a threat in some portions of its range.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Schreiber et al. (1989) affirm that the tropical weasel may occur in several of the large national parks of Amazonia. It has been reported to occur in the Tambopata Reserve Zone (Emmons pers. comm), and unconfired reports exist from Cocha Cashu and Alto Purus (Emmons pers. comm).
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Wikipedia

Amazon weasel

The Amazon weasel (Mustela africana), also known as the tropical weasel, is a species of weasel that lives in the Amazon Rainforest in South America. It is rated "Least Concern" by the IUCN Red List. Despite its scientific name, it is not found in Africa. It is a shiny brown weasel with a white or cream belly with a brown stripe down the chest. The Amazon weasel measures 9.8 to 15 in (25 to 38 cm) in length. It has a tail length of 3.9–7.9 in (9.9–20 cm). The Amazon weasel is rarely seen and little is known about it. They eat rodents and other small mammals, and make their homes in the stumps of hollow trees.

The two subspecies of the Amazon weasel are M. a. africana and M. a. stolzmanni

References

  • Emmons, L. & Helgen, K. (2008). Mustela africana. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 6 March 2009.
  • Emmons, L.H. (1997). Neotropical Rainforest Mammals, 2nd ed. University of Chicago Press ISBN 0-226-20721-8


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