Overview

Distribution

Range Description

The species occurs in the states of Sergipe, Bahia and Minas Gerais in northeastern Brazil (Pessôa and Reis, 2002).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This rodent occurs in drier habitats than others in the genus. T. a. albispinus occurs in climax forest with some deciduous trees. T. a. sertonius inhabits typical ‘caatinga’, a climax forest of mainly deciduous trees characterized by unpredictable rainfall and semiarid conditions, with vegetation including plants of the families Cactaceae and Bromeliaceae (Pessôa and Reis, 2002). T. a. minor occurs in the Morro do Chapeu at the northern edge of the Espinhaco range in the state of Bahia, an area with rock formations at 800-2,000 m asl. From 800 to 1,000 m, the vegetation is characteristically savanna, which grades into grasslands between 1,000 and 1,100 m. Some records indicate that females are pregnant between January and June; these specimens contained two to four embryos.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Trinomys albispinus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Catzeflis, F., Patton J., Percequillo, A., Bonvicino, C. & Weksler, M.

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Schipper, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining at nearly the rate required to qualify for listing in a threatened category. Species of this genus are the most abundant in forest of this region.

History
  • 1996
    Lower Risk/near threatened
    (Baillie and Groombridge 1996)
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Population

Population
This species is abundant in forest.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The major threat is habitat destruction in the form of forest fragmentation and degradation.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species occurs in Sergipe protected area.
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Wikipedia

White-spined Atlantic spiny rat

The white-spined Atlantic spiny rat (Trinomys albispinus) is a spiny rat species endemic to Brazil.[2]

Description[edit]

The white-spined species is one of the smaller spiny rats, with a head-body length of 15 to 21 cm (5.9 to 8.3 in), and a tail 12 to 18 centimetres (4.7 to 7.1 in) long. Adult weight can be anything from 120 to 230 g (4.2 to 8.1 oz). The fur on the upper body and flanks is tawny to buff, interspersed with much paler (although usually not pure white) spines. The underparts, including the lower surface of the tail, are white.[3]

Females are pregnant between January and June, and give birth to litters of up to four young.[3]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The white-spined Atlantic spiny rat is found in a relatively small region of eastern Brazil, in the states of Sergipe and Bahia. Compared with other spiny rats, they are adapted for a relatively dry climate, and the region is dominated semi-arid caatinga forest with a mix of deciduous trees and cactuses, among other plants.[3]

Three subspecies are recognised from different parts of this region:

  • T. a. albispinus - southern coastal parts of the range
  • T. a. minor - inland parts of the range
  • T. a. sertonius - northern coastal parts of the range

References[edit]

  1. ^ Catzeflis, F., Patton, J., Percequillo, A., Bonvicino, C. & Weksler, M. (2008). Trinomys albispinus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 6 January 2009.
  2. ^ Woods, C. A. and C. W. Kilpatrick. 2005. Hystricognathi. pp 1538–1600 in Mammal Species of the World a Taxonomic and Geographic Reference 3rd ed. D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder eds. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington D.C.
  3. ^ a b c Pessôa, L.M. & dos Reis, S.F. (2002). "Proechimys albispinus". Mammalian Species: Number 693: pp. 1–3. doi:10.1644/1545-1410(2002)693<0001:PA>2.0.CO;2. 


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